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12:03 AM
Well, I think this is the grand re-launch of my website. If anyone gets bored and breaks it, please let me know :) I've still got to clean up the code but I got it functional (I think)
I already know that the sidebar doesn't scroll on mobile in landscape but I'm too tired to fix that now :P
 
 
1 hour later…
1:16 AM
hi
 
 
1 hour later…
2:19 AM
@roganjosh On mobile opening menu causes the page content to shrink (basically half menu and half content). Still functional but probably not want you wanted :). I can send you a screenshot if you need later
 
2:37 AM
@toonarmycaptain In Win any file with the hidden attribute set to true is hidden (filename doesn't actually matter but leading for is still common)
 
3:16 AM
@LinkBerest Fair enough. I remember being about...well single digits, and being able to mess with files in DOS that I couldn't in Win3.1, lol.
 
3:59 AM
Yeah, Dos had the same system (hangover from IBM) but an easy work around dir /ah whereas you had to go into folder options and "view" for each folder you wanted to show hidden files in with 3 (I think 3.1 added the "view all hidden" option but my memory gets foggy there....95 definitely had that option).
I wasn't "single digits" back then but neither was I an "old hand" yet :P :)
 
 
2 hours later…
5:43 AM
@AndrasDeak Yeah, I read somewhere that at a particular corporate network, there was a system policy in place that scans the USB drive before the safely remove option for any "unauthorized files" and will remove them as part of the process. Needless to say, simply unplugging the USB drive will skip that process.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:04 AM
From pandas 1.0, the documentation recommends using astype("string") instead of astype(str) for some pretty good reasons, take a look. — cs95 Jul 19 at 10:19
 
 
1 hour later…
8:04 AM
So close and yet so far :(
def strtobool (val):
    val = val.lower()
    if val in ('y', 'yes', 't', 'true', 'on', '1'):
        return 1
    elif val in ('n', 'no', 'f', 'false', 'off', '0'):
        return 0
    else:
        raise ValueError("invalid truth value %r" % (val,))
 
Hello strtobool, my old friend hums and sings
 
if it were atleast a bool
but the project is huge and I'm afraid of chaning it :P
 
8:22 AM
@Hakaishin Seeing that you know there must be ... is 1 lurking somewhere.
 
@Hakaishin Well, in principle bool subclasses int precisely because many projects make this error plus historical reasons, so you can just swap 1 -> True and 0 -> False in Python. In practice, I would be lying if I said that there will definitely be no problem from such a change.
 
@IljaEverilä yes :D
 
FYI, this sounds useful, for making scraping not brittle Robula+: an algorithm to generate robust XPath-based locators
 
ugh lnav seems as intuitive as emacs
 
@cs95 1. I can't find any mentions of astype(str) or dtype=str on that page, do you have a more specific link? 2. Is that because dtype=str will give you object dtype and now there's a new string dtype?
 
8:40 AM
@AndrasDeak You're right, that isn't explicitly said. I think you have to read across multiple release notes and doc, including [All dtypes can now be converted to StringDtype]((pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/whatsnew/…). I expect they will mention this in future doc once they've verified that astype('string') works well for all cases.
 
@LinkBerest Yeah, I've noticed that. Silly Bootstrap for not making a sidebar. I'm happy to live with it for now because I don't know enough CSS to make it so that it slides over the content vs compressing it when viewed in portrait on a mobile. The content of the pages should be workable, though
 
I did a little thing: github.com/holdenweb/hu. Opinions/criticism/PRs welcome!
 
@AndrasDeak How is it possible that your message references a message which came after yours?
 
@LinkBerest More pressing is that it seems my fake machines have gone bonkers since pushing it live so the graphs are... interesting. It's probably more akin to the reality (we've had an automated pallet truck try and escape through a fire exit, for instance) but I suppose it needs fixing
 
@roganjosh the uprising is close
 
8:52 AM
It was rather more tragic. The steps led to the canal. I think he'd given up on robot life :(
 
@Hakaishin ~magic~
 
9:09 AM
@AndrasDeak you've to read between the lines. dtype=str will give you a column of objects which is what the docs recommend dropping in favour of the new StringDType, yes
Of course there's also the option of using convert_dtypes to blanket convert your primitive columns into extension/nullable dtypes
 
@cs95 yeah, as a non-pandas user I wasn't sure
 
Sure. Although I wonder why they don't just automatically override dtype=str to create StringDType where possible automatically?
backwards incompatibility, probably...
 
that's easy: backwards compat
 
ah yep
ha, Kevin'd
 
is it possible to find the top 1000 github repos for python?
 
9:23 AM
@ThelurkerLurker using what metric?
 
i was forks or stars, maybe both to compare?
or if there is another suggestion?
 
9:36 AM
or really any metric for now?
 
github.com/… is promising
Query string is an empty string, might do something weird...
 
thanks - but there are not many stars there
 
Rampaging killbots defeated (hopefully) without throwing endless waves of my own men at them. I forgot to set --preload on gunicorn to stop multiple processes fighting over who gets to run the scheduled tasks
 
i think it did do something weird
ah ok i found the advanced search and that looks a little promising
 
 
1 hour later…
11:03 AM
Strange, I've now seen several people asking for private inheritance (ala C++) lately.
Wondering whether they are aware what it means to ask "is it possible"...
pets Cthulhu
 
@MisterMiyagi as python grows and gets into business the more prevelant these kind of questions are gonna become
 
private inheritance just seems like a very niche request.
Especially since one of the askers didn't even manage to separate methods and functions properly. :/
 
There is something very satisfying about deleting not anymore used code :) It's like cleaning up your room, but way nicer
 
11:18 AM
private inheritance is like composition without having to write a bunch of wrapper methods
def this_is_annoying(self, *args, **kwargs):
    return self._wrapped_object.this_is_annoying(*args, **kwargs)
 
Meh, most of the time public inheritance works for that use-case just as well.
If it should look like a duck, walk like a duck, and quack like a duck, one might just as well use a genetically spliced jaguar-shark-duck.
 
@Hakaishin I'm reminded of i.stack.imgur.com/cDIvc.gif
 
@AndrasDeak That's like cleaning up your room, but way more thorough.
 
11:39 AM
Any idea why I can't submit my question titled "Number type with range or error?"? I'm just told 'Title cannot contain "Number type with range or error?"' but it doesn't tell me why or how to fix it.
Nevermind, fixed it by renaming to "Number type with accuracy information?".
 
It has "error" in the title
There are some dumb filters
 
Thanks. That indeed sounds dumb, and at the very least it could've told me that it's just that one word.
 
11:58 AM
lol wait strtobool is not even custom sadness, it's python built in. Huh, this should really be changed
 
distutils is ancient, but it's here to stay. :/
 
 
2 hours later…
1:33 PM
Me: we're pretty sure that the problem is caused by the FlurkProvider.
Compiler: correct.
Me: when the FlurkProvider is bad, it throws a BadFlurkProviderException.
Compiler: right.
Me: so it stands to reason that when I run this code, it will throw BadFlurkProviderException.
Compiler: Sounds good to me.
Me: Great. Please run the code.
Compiler: The program exited with an uncaught FileNotFoundException :^)
I have a bad feeling that one of these opaque third party libraries is silently catching BadFlurkProviderExceptions. Was it you, left-pad? Huh? You feel like silencing exceptions while you format my strings?
 
let's hope none of the authors read Stack Overflow
 
I have: threading.Thread(target=app.run, args=("0.0.0.0", ), name="Image server").start() and I have a signal handler catching ctr+c and doing stuff. Is there a way for me to relay that signal to the flask app? It hangs and doesn't close the program. I tried this: stackoverflow.com/questions/15562446/… But it didn't work
 
1:58 PM
Does anything change if you set the Thread's dameon property to True before starting it? (note: even if it does, this is probably not a good idea for production-quality code. But it may give useful diagnostic info here)
 
2:13 PM
@roganjosh wow, looks really good! I noticed on the Machine Scheduling app that in the single test case I ran, machine 1 was scheduled to be offline for nearly the entire month of August while the utilization chart shows 20% for the month.
 
Relaying messages between threads is typically fairly easy, since they share the same process... But in the ideal case, you have a section of your code where the listening thread can conveniently and periodically check for messages. But I expect Flask's mainloop is somewhat hidden from you...
Devil's advocate: go with the lazy solution and make the thread a daemon. We don't care that abruptly terminating a flask session with no cleanup is a no-no in production, because the only time we'll be ctrl-c-ing the server in production is when everything else is on fire anyway.
 
@Kevin lol, yes using ctrl c in production :D
 
Maybe put an "Are you SURE?" prompt beforehand, and also put the ctrl key under a hard plastic cover to prevent a stray can of red bull from jettisoning your database
 
@Kevin for real 10 years ago on one of my first lan party a stray EMPTY redbull can dropped from the table with a single drop in it, fell onto a electric multiplug thingy and fried everything :D Well it popped the security or what it's called in english. But that was hilarious :)
 
Perhaps "surge protector" or "fusebox" depending on what popped where
 
2:24 PM
Yeah, probably a circuit breaker since Europe
 
fuse was the word right
nice the daemon argument did it
 
Although if Hakaishin is Swiss they might do different things... Swiss power plugs make life miserable :P
 
Ah, I use fusebox and circuitbreaker interchangeably, even though on reflection my fusebox contains no fuses
 
I saw fuses on power plugs on trains either in Switzerland or Germany, but 1. I don't remember which country and 2. trains might be a special case
 
I just mentally categorize it as "the rectangle in my garage that I only open when something bad happens"
Much like the engine compartment in my car. I open it, say "well, all the pieces are still there", and that's the extent of my knowledge
 
2:26 PM
@Kevin lots of US movies have taught me that all US houses have fuses
and when it goes dark you have to go outside into the shed where they are located, with a barely functioning flashlight
 
US movies taught me that too, which is why I'm confused that all the houses I've ever lived in did not match that stereotype
It must be reality that's wrong
 
Perhaps what you see are high-level wrappers for fuses. Behind the grey box with the little switches is a Babbagely complex machinery that replaces the fuses each time you flip the switch up.
 
[I put my ear to the box. The music from Peewee's breakfast machine plays faintly in the background]
I think the rubber chicken is misaligned... That's your problem right there
 
@Dodge thanks :) would this perhaps be dependent on the particular products that you assigned? Utilisation is measured weekly so by "the full month" you mean the graph flatlined on 20% despite being offline in the schedule table?
 
2:43 PM
@roganjosh yes, there were one or fwo periods where the machine 1 was online I think
That's my testcase
 
Cool, don't suppose you have the forecast handy too?
 
I just added that to the imgur post
 
It's randomised on refresh and also editable. Throw in 10k random iterations and reproducibility is fun :P
Perfect, thanks! I'll have a look when I get back home. Much appreciated
 
Yeah no problem
 
Trying to figure out what actually happens when you drip red bull onto a multiplug thing. I don't think it causes a voltage spike, which is what surge protectors are good at preventing. Circuit breakers, on the other hand, are good at preventing current spikes. Can red bull cause a current spike?
I guess a centimeter-long droplet of an electrolyte-infused liquid has lower impedance than your average household appliance... Right?
Thought experiment which should not be tried at home under any circumstance: what happens if you put both ends of a highly conductive wire into the two non-ground holes of an electrical outlet?
 
2:55 PM
A short circuit
 
Hmm! So the outgoing line doesn't expect to carry as much current as the incoming line? Interesting
 
I think it is the sudden change in circuit length which abrublty lowers impedance
 
Skimming through various wikipedia articles leads me to believe that rate of change is a factor, yeah
Now suppose you plug in an impede-o-tron, which is initially set to "as much impedance as a household appliance", and you slowly dial it down to 0...
 
@Kevin lot less. See also sticking your finger in.
 
The magnet in the breaker will eventually become strong enogh to flip the switch and turn off the circuit
 
3:00 PM
Makes sense.
 
@Kevin a factor, but breakers are rated for current. I've got 16A breakers here. Steady 16A should break it. Surges would be different (not sure in which direction)
@Kevin pop and hopefully a tripped breaker and no fire
 
Apparently surges can come from either direction during a lightning strike. Interesting.
 
Yup. And surge protectors can be too slow for lightning damage I think.
But +3 against arcane
 
Funny that I have more knowledge on circuit breakers than car engines
Home improvement childhood
And adolescence
 
On an academic level I know how fuel, oxygen, and spark plugs turn the pistons in my car's engine, but from a practical standpoint I don't know what all the other stuff does
It's only three things, why are there so many tubes and gears and stuff
 
3:07 PM
Makes sense to know more about a house than a car. I spend at least eight hours in my house every day, but I've never spent more than six hours in a car.
 
If you break down in a remote location, you might break that record :-) [knock on wood]
 
@JohnnyApplesauce plus house problems are easier to fix in terms of tooling and expertise, and often cheaper to repair if you screw up
 
You think you're spatially intelligent and can correctly write angles until you cut trim for the winding cupboards installed by the last homeowner.
I think we had to go back to Lowe's that day after running out of trim strips.
 
kludging an engine repair can be a bit all-or-nothing. Then again so is burning your house down in an electric fire.
 
Hi everyone :)
I have implemented multiple python scripts which are to be run simultaneously & they do the job well. Sometimes some of them have to wait for input files from sources not under my watch, that's why I am not running them one ofter the other.
It is getting a bit hard to maintain, loads of scripts to modify if I wanna modify something, lots of things to check... seems like this is not a good practice
previously I have dealt with threads, when I wanted to send signals to crypto markets without one signal waiting for the other one's confirmation that it has been executed
is threading good practice in my case now? (multiple scripts waiting for different inputs, they run when they have it, wait again)
or is there something else I should look up
 
3:29 PM
@zabop probably yes
If your concurrent scripts use less than 1 CPU's full load together then threading is feasible
Or I guess at least much lesd than n CPUs for n scripts
 
yeah they don't use much CPU
alright
thanks!
 
Wikipedia claims that my amazing impede-o-tron can't exist: "in general, neither impedance nor admittance can vary with time". But maybe they're saying that the impedance of a circuit with no moving parts doesn't change. My impede-o-tron has a moving part, the dial, so maybe it can ignore the rule
 
@Kevin yes. I was told old carousels used to have switches that were graphite rods sinking into a bucket of water. The more graphite was in the water, the larger the current. Prevented high-voltage arcs from forming.
 
If this track pad wasn't so slippery, I'd draw a circuit diagram of my impede-o-tron in MS Paint. It's basically a semiconductive wire wrapped around the dial, which makes contact with the input and output wires at varying points depending on how it's turned
 
3:44 PM
@MisterMiyagi reposting the same off-sitr link didn't cut it for you? Shame.
 
Whoops, I thought impedance and resistance were the same thing, but I think I'm wrong... electrical systems always have a new term to keep me on my toes
 
@Kevin i.e. a potmeter?
 
Oh hey, I have one of those in my box o' Arduino bits.
This whole time I could have tried at home my extremely inadvisable thought experiment.
I'm guessing my dinky little potentiometer would pop even at the highest setting. I need something real beefy to approximate the resistance of, say, a toaster
 
Pretty sure arduino sets don't expect 10 amps :P
 
Exactly so :-)
 
3:54 PM
@AndrasDeak Indeed. It's tragedy how unhelpful SO is.
 
@Kevin If you have 16A breakers, at 110 V that means 1760 W of power before it is designed to break. That's quite some heating power.
 
Google suggests that putting even 1 amp through your arduino is a good way to free the magic smoke within
 
Yeah, I know RPis are best kept on the mA scale
 
The potentiometer I ordered separately from the Arduino kit, so it might be able to do a good light bulb impression before melting
 
by the way the same current would be ~3500 W here due to 240 V. Which is why we have fewer fires due to space heaters. We need half the current for the same power.
 
4:04 PM
@AndrasDeak I miss 240V, 110V feels so...low.
 
I think this is the potmeter I've got. The data sheet says its resistance can vary between 5K and 10M ohms. Google tells me the typical toaster has a resistance of about 25 ohms. This is a surprise to me.
I figured the potmeter would undershoot the resistance of an appliance, not overshoot it
This intuition is based on zero prior evidence, as is often the case when I'm mentally modeling circuit behavior
 
@Kevin lower resistance = higher current, not what you normally want
of course you don't put mains voltage on a potmeter, normally
so perhaps scratch that argument
 
Yeah I'm usually powering the thing with a single AA battery so I imagine that puts something of a limit on its max amperage
At least as long as I don't get my hands on a room temperature superconductor
I think my intuition corrects itself if I consider the conductance of the potmeter rather than the resistance. their reciprocal relationship is where I got turned upside down.
 
4:23 PM
not reproducible (OP was using old shell instance) stackoverflow.com/questions/63269023/…
 
 
3 hours later…
7:29 PM
@Dodge Can repro but it is actually correct. But I need to add a clarifying point - the equipment utilisation is the proportion of time that the machine is scheduled to run that it actually runs. Given that you set a 6-2 shift, for every single day it will always have 2 offline entries (2-10 and 10-6 shift). That means that in a week of 7 days (only 5 of which fall into a 6-2 shift) it only needs to run once to get to 20% utilisation
I have asked in this room before about whether the 6-2/2-10/10-6 rotation is established elsewhere in manufacturing and it might just be a UK thing. The absolute utilisation is obviously much less than 20% but in the real system I built, it makes more sense to report it as a figure in relation to the scheduled shifts. It's helped managers look at the data and say "well, we're currently running two shifts but we can cut back to only one and still meet targets"
 
7:43 PM
In any case, the feedback has made me see that it's not clear at all, as stated, so I'll do some editing. Thanks :)
 
@roganjosh - when I worked in the semiconductor industry, there was a huge amount of attention given to equipment state tracking and utilization, for several reasons: 1) the equipment was so expensive; paying the depreciation expense on $10MM litho, plasma, and chemical processing tools accounted for 50% of the final cost for any chip; ...
2) balancing scheduled maintenance downtime vs. production; you could run the equipment at 100%, but eventually it would get dirty internally and the chips you were producing were junk; but you couldn't do maintenance 80% of the time, the equipment has to be making actual parts some time; and ...
3) balancing engineering new process development vs. production; the equipment was too expensive to have duplicate tools in a process dev lab, so process engineers needed access to the production equipment to work out new process methods.
They worked out a standard for tracking all these different times, and corresponding metrics, called E-10. Here are some links. The one-page overview gives you a general idea, and the video gives away more details, especially some of the metrics (which you would normally need to shell out to buy the standard).
1-page overview: https://www.semi.org/en/Standards/CTR_031244
Explanatory video: https://vimeo.com/166223141
Buy the spec (only $300): https://store-us.semi.org/products/e01000-semi-e10-specification-for-definition-and-measurement-of-equipment-reliability-availability-and-maintainability-ram-and-utilization
Or was this a question that was posed by @Dodge?
 
8:00 PM
It's an observation made by Dodge that I replied to but it's still useful info, thanks :) Especially since I'm in FMCG currently and I don't think we calculate depreciation on some equipment from the 1960s :P. My primary concern is that the operators get given a schedule and just have to wing it on how to meet it. A dept. might have 8 machines, each of which making 12 different products and they don't know when things will be consumed downstream
The result being that, most of the time, they're making the wrong thing and end up with a stockpile of 1 thing and a massive shortage of others. The only option is to throw more shifts to make more randomly guessed stuff
 
Yeah, pretty classic shotgun scheduling. "Just keep making something, we'll be sure to need some of it." Then to keep down overhead from setup time, the runs to make 100 parts get done for 300 parts, since we'll need those extra 200 eventually.
Read "The Goal" by Goldratt. He gets a little preachy, but its a fun read.
 
8:55 PM
I'll have to check it out :)
 
So I got a best practices question ab out PyTorch. When using other people's networks I often get mismatches on the number of channels like: RuntimeError: Given groups=1, weight of size [64, 3, 3, 3], expected input[2, 1, 224, 224] to have 3 channels, but got 1 channels instead. Now my question is whats the best way to identify where in the code or even the model structure this mismatch is located?
 
10:03 PM
So, for example, one strategy is to dump it to onnx then find the break in netron, but I can't quite match the name of the layer to the break.
 
 
2 hours later…
11:52 PM
@Mikhail If you know how to construct your own networks, you won't have much trouble deconstructing others'
so I would start by reading through the documentation and understanding how the networks are initialized, what are the input and hidden layer dimensions, the outputs and transfer functions (assuming neural nets here)
 

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