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5:11 AM
duplicate; my original nomination had expired and now I squandered my close vote before realizing I had nominated this as a duplicate myself stackoverflow.com/questions/57590672/…
 
@tripleee Done
 
5:28 AM
@IljaEverilä (y) thx
 
Anybody have any thoughts on how to get ~20 GB of GPU memory for free :-)
I was thinking of a five finger discount but I can't find any servers nearby
 
 
1 hour later…
6:36 AM
@Mikhail Aren't GPUs expensive things?
 
7:12 AM
Hey guys is there a better library to use that guess_language_spirit to determine the language used in text? currently testing it in the python shell and doesn't seem to work the best
 
8:02 AM
@Kwsswart bitbucket.org/spirit/guess_language/src/default It seems like a simple project. If you dont find other project, try submitting an issue or improving it yourself.
 
@khajvah Will take a look, just very strange keep receiving these errors dpaste.com/HKLVVCBS9 which eo means esperanto and I am very curious as to why
 
8:16 AM
@Kevin A recent example was "Why does ["B"] in ["A", "B"] give False. Shouldn't it be True?".
 
I wonder how should the tag for the databases library be named. python-databases? It's starting to pop up in questions, and there's much potential for confusion with SQLAlchemy, because they use its Core DSL as a way to define queries.
As a personal note, that's one poorly named library.
 
8:27 AM
@NicolasGervais Did someone tell you about the cv-pls tags? Asking for reasonable CVs here can be very efficient to take down the worst offenders.
Other than that, I'm afraid the risk/reward for answering versus closing is just broken on SO. At least for the kind of trash Q&A that the python tag attracts.
Keep fighting the good fight, and vent your frustration here every now and then.
 
8:49 AM
@MisterMiyagi Thanks for the support. Will do for sure. I knew about the tag but I can't do that 5 times per day.
 
"Thank you for your answer roganjosh. I ended up doing something similar but it doesn't work" --> proceeds to str(pandas.Series) and then start stripping it down component-by-component. I guess I've lost my touch if that's what I was implying...
 
Question: do you guys work with feature branches? If yes, do you have long lived branches?
I want to claim, long-lived branches are antipattern. Need some objections
 
9:09 AM
Depends on what you mean by "long-lived".
 
Why is it an antipattern? If the context is git, the cost of a branch is extremely low and having the branch labels (even after merging back into its source) is useful as a context.
 
@MisterMiyagi Doing QA on the branch before merging. Or for the sake of argument, longer than a week old
 
Branches are literally just a label on any commit that may or may not be dangling off elsewhere
 
@metatoaster Integration becomes harder and harder (assuming master is the version that gets delivered to customers).
 
@khajvah Our notable feature branches are 1-4 weeks, with significant review/QA.
There are some shorter-lived feature branches, but usually they indicate that we messed up and need a bugfix.
 
9:13 AM
It does depend on how your development group tolerate a workflow that may have multiple concurrent different features being under development
sounds like where you are don't, so you see that as an antipattern
 
@metatoaster yeah that;s why I am challenging my idea here :D
@MisterMiyagi is it being tested after it is merged?
 
FWIW, we don't allow anything but feature branches. master/prod is protected in all non-personal repos.
 
you need to have a CI pipeline in place to test that whatever is being merged works, and you need a policy in place as to how merges happen
 
@khajvah For every push, CI runs on the branch + the current merge.
 
current merge?
 
9:16 AM
a policy might look like: feature branch to be merged (or rebased) onto the staging must pass CI - if that pass the merge happens (becoming next feature merge base) and next feature must either rebase or merge successfully with this new merge base
 
@khajvah The state you get if the branch were merged into master/prod right now. Versus testing just the branch as it is.
 
current merge as in the feature branch that is being added right now
you will also need a policy on how to deal with code restructuring as that will have drastic impact on how much work to get other work being merged
 
@MisterMiyagi that works on current features. what about new ones. Those usually go through manual QA
 
basically, if you are in a team, team members MUST talk to each other
new features can keep inside their feature branch, periodically keep up to date by monitoring the latest staging branch and the development team behind that should periodically attempt to rebase onto (or merge with) that - again this depend on the policy in place
 
@khajvah I don't quite understand why that wouldn't work for new features. Testing ensures that there is no interference with existing features, and new features are required to ship with new tests.
 
9:21 AM
if the development team maintains good discipline with keeping track of changes with main development, any problem you described initially should not occur
 
@metatoaster let's say, there is a team of 50 engineers on a monolith. each working on a 2-3 week old branches
 
Linux kernel has thousands of developers with very long live branches
 
how do you make sure they dont break each others' components without integrting
 
they have massive number of features
 
@khajvah Do these 50 engineers have code-ownership of individual parts of the monolith?
 
9:22 AM
@metatoaster do they though? Also, as far as I know most changes are on driver side of things
where there is no dependencies
@MisterMiyagi Sure, but there are common components obviously
 
haha, they have long discussions on how to maintain internal ABIs - as I noted there needs to be communications
anyway, it depends on your product cycle - if you have yearly long releases, 2-3 week old branches should not be a problem
as long as the teams responsible for the branch know to merge them to the latest development/staging, and CI passes, it's fine
 
@metatoaster thats a good point. We have 2 week release cycle
some brnaches month old
 
@khajvah The real question is whether these expose a stable API or not. As long as only internals are optimised/changed, the rest of the team/software does not have to care about core changes.
Otherwise, looking at formalised deprecation strategies may be more important than how you structure your git workflow.
 
if teams keep breaking each other's stuff, your teams are not working or communicating with each other - that's a much deeper and more fundamental problem that no VCS will be able to solve
back to the Linux kernel - if your large project is structured in a modular manner, with a formalized internal API that everyone agreed upon, merges shouldn't break stuff
even for some of my personal projects - I have branches that are literally two years old and I've made multiple releases of that package - however, I've kept those branches up-to-date with the latest API
so provided that your development teams have the discipline to keep their long-lived branches maintained with a way that keeps up-to-date with the latest release of the 2 week release cycle, that is perfectly fine
 
is there a a pdf modul out there which can do this task / select a specif part of a pdf document and extract the text ?
 
9:37 AM
@metatoaster thats one more variable to define "long-lived" I guess
 
Haha, yeah, found the commits in my project that I was thinking of - I had a commit originally created at Sat Apr 21 16:42:54 2018 +1200 that was rebased onto a parent written at Sun Apr 22 19:49:16 2018 +1200 initially, but now that same commit has a parent that was created at Fri Jul 3 15:15:58 2020 +1200
that same commit had been modified to fit with the new internal API changes
so it's 2+ years old now
 
@metatoaster Actual quality check(E2E, UI tests) is performed on, lets say, "live branch". So you must run those tests periodically on feature branches to get feedback on the quality.
My point is, longer it lives. Longer time it takes to get feedback on the quality
 
Uh, every time a feature branch that gets updated, they should also undergo those same tests, that's my argument. Tests should be automated such that it is done.
There is nothing preventing your long lived feature branches from receiving feedback on quality really
 
but those tests are expensive to run. I.e. feature branch has to be deployed(web app) in some environment, and then to fully test, it might take like 8 hours
plus some manual tests as some cases are impossible to automate
 
Well, it's either having long lived feature branches that gives your developers the ability to work longer (have adequate time) to build the features, or not have it really.
As I said, if it's the policy and other factors that are breaking, it isn't the fault of the VCS really. Fix those fundamental processes rather than trying to force your developers from wrapping up a half-baked feature and hope it doesn't break live
 
9:46 AM
There are 2 possibilities here. 1. plan for small iterations. Ideally you shouldnt have a feature that takes 3 weeks to develop if your release cycle is 2 weeks.
2. utilizing feature flags. Which gives the possibility of putting versioning inside the ode
@metatoaster no no, I am not challenging VCS.
 
or be okay with not having feedback until the feature is ready, or figure out how to get testing for long-term features that take more than a few release cycles to develop
it's an organizational issue, it has nothing to do with long lived branches - that's only the symptom, not the cause
 
Oh I love having quotationmarks in comments. Makes everything so much clearer. # Should only happen on "real" cases
Like, what is that supposed to mean :P
 
@metatoaster let's take the extreme scenario, I pull a branch for a 2 month feature. Before I am ready, the projects gets fully tested and released 10 times. I end up with 2 versions, one stable version and one 2 month old version with my feature in it.
 
You should have rebased your two month old changes on top of the stable version and see that it works.
 
Now, if I only worked on one component. That's cool but if I touched common components, which is common in our case, I get 2 month behind
 
9:54 AM
Then every single outstanding ones need to keep up with the latest one if the development demands it
if you have a dozen different long-lived branches, each of them should keep up with the latest release branch at the very least - and they may need to communicate with each other to be sure they are not stamping on each other
 
That's a good point. I guess if you bring the stable version into your branch periodically
 
Yes, that's what I said about even my personal project
 
@Mikhail you can check if Download More RAM supports GPU memory
 
I had a feature I started working on 2+ years ago - I made a number of internal API changes - if I merge the original branch on now it will literally not work (or merge) - but I had put in the effort to maintain that branch with the most recent changes so it is just about a dozen additional commits on top of current release version
 
But then again, it assumes you haven't touched many common components
 
9:57 AM
doesn't matter if one or many really - those developers will need to keep up with any internal common changes
 
okok, thanks a lot. I might get back to you :D
Will think a bit
 
if your project keeps making many internal common changes, that signifies some fundamental issues
like not having a stable internal API
not that it's a bad thing - it's only a problem if the pace of change outpaces the ability for the team to keep up
 
@metatoaster we are changing a lot. I mean a lot. I am not sure it's feasible to have that
On the current monolith at least.
 
Then you might want to have a policy where your developers have to rebase (or merge) with mainline staging once a week (say every Friday or end of week) so that they at the very least know that they are keeping up with internal API changes
you can have something that monitors those branches in your main repository to be sure their common base branch is not over x days old
 
From Linux example, imaging making changes to the scheduler or the driver API(dunno what's called) twice a month
 
10:00 AM
well, the scheduler in Linux can be swapped in and out
 
@metatoaster yeap, that might work. Will think about it
 
but yeah the underlying API for that is defined more formally
it's a multiple stage thing - you need to have CI (so that the code passes automated testing), and then something else to monitor the lifecycle of the branch (e.g. last committed, they share which common commits with staging/release)
 
@metatoaster halfway through I realised it's a bad example :D
 
and of course a policy in place within your organization to facilitate all of that, and lastly communication between teams and team members
 
thanks a lot. I will organize my thoughts and think about the master->branch integration
 
10:12 AM
cabbage, all, bugrit
I'm surprised nobody above has mentioned feature flags, which offer a more controlled way of adding functionality over several releases.
Unless that'as how the discussion started and I came in too late.
 
31 mins ago, by khajvah
2. utilizing feature flags. Which gives the possibility of putting versioning inside the ode
 
Figures, thanks. We're just starting to realise their power at work.
 
I am in the process of "convincing" the management
but I wanted general input about feature branches, as my experience is only on fast changing, throw away experiments of the web world
 
My manager actually chose Launch Darkly when we told him we wanted to use FFs. He needed no convincing at all. Guess I'm lucky (though TBF we are doing this in self-defense in trying to get away from a weekly release cycle).
 
yeah, we are moving to microservices now in backend. But there is huge mobile team plus website
so it's huge organizational change
 
10:23 AM
@khajvah If your tests take 8 hours, then you probably have a testing/architecture issue, not a workflow issue. This sounds like you cannot test changed modules in isolation, either because the tests or architectures are not modular.
 
While our primary interest is in testing new code in the production environment, we also see great potential for A/B testings and incremental migrations. As you will have guessed we are also aiming at a service-oriented environment, but there are lots of legacy features to battle with.
Our full test/QA suite also takes way too long ...
 
@MisterMiyagi we are mobile application. tests are run on mobile devices. Of course we are working on API tests but those won't guarantee deployability
@holdenweb like 3 days :D
@holdenweb we actually have okish experimentation platform, so we might utilize that as feature flags
 
No, I think the team normally get it done inside eight hours, but there are manual tasks and smoke tests to be run after staging and production deployments.
 
most of our features are tested manually right now. It's pain
 
 
2 hours later…
12:03 PM
@metatoaster my team's branches (the ones which are the part of the architecture and some of the first started) take about 5 weeks before any other team touches them (before covid it was 3-4 weeks)
 
I mean if there was adequate communications beforehand with what the changes were to be about I don't really see the problem
 
 
1 hour later…
1:25 PM
To be fair, big part of why it takes so long is every 2 Sprints we have to stop and check if we pass regulations and those test take a while
 
1:55 PM
Compliance tests are always headache.
 
Compiler: warning: couldn't resolve reference to library WidgetReticulator
Me: Dang. But why is this a warning and not an error? Does that mean the library is never used, or is there a chance that this could trigger a crash at runtime?
Compiler: idk bro :^)
 
@Kevin lol, like warning stair are missing. But maybe you are superman and still want to go ahead
My router gives me many lines like this: SMS received, from +3b#627*3b1c3#9. Any ideas?
 
2:25 PM
...why does your router have access to a mobile network?
 
It's a router which get's internet using a sim
 
ah, 3g/4g/5g thingy
let's hope it wasn't your future self trying to tell you next week's lottery numbers
 
Wikipedia tells me that phones occasionally receive "silent SMS" messages as a way of getting geolocation data about the device
Maybe that's what's happening here
 
hello
can someone help me?
 
Perhaps
 
Probably the most useful thing you can do right now is gather more diagnostic information about your program's failure. Try removing the try: and except: pass from the code, and see what exception and stack trace is being raised
 
@StuartLee Please be mindful of volunteers' time and make sure to properly provide all necessary information. In specific, format your code properly (the def ResetCpanel(url): should be part of the code), and explain in how far the code failed.
Consider that people cannot run this code, so they rely on you to provide such information.
 
Agreed. Ideally, you'd post an error message and stack trace in the first draft of the question.
But better late than never, right ;-)
 
yes that my problems sir
i just want make send a cPanel password reset to my email
but i try code like that but still nothing
like this example if use browser : demo.cpanel.net:2083/resetpass?start=1
 
3:12 PM
You still get nothing even if you delete all except: passes from your code? Strange...
 
3:53 PM
2nd call OP posts a debugging wall of (someone else's) code which takes log of a negative number, then blames "Global optimization" and numpy libraries. stackoverflow.com/questions/63182486/…
@NicolasGervais Welcome to the responsible minority... maybe <<5% of SO Python tag users take an active interest in stemming the flow of garbage that SO now openly admits it solicits, to improve its financial KPI. Just downvote and/or close the worst stuff, then post here. Or close-as-dupe. For stuff that might be salavageable/ where the OP doesn't have unifxably bad attitude ("Here's the spec, I don't know Python, my manager/customer needs working code by tomorrow 7am"), use comments.
Your wider question about the existential future of SO and the [python] tag has been discussed to death by us here in the last few years, and on Meta, and (increasingly) off SO. The following verse might be appropriate: "And they shall not teach, each one his neighbor and each one his brother..."
As we come to the end of another economic cycle, internet startups that still haven't gotten their exit (and these days that can only be acquisition, not IPO fantasies) will cut every which corner to 'achieve' ther KPIs, and if said KPIs encourage antisocial or site-destructive behaviors, we can't prevent them destroying their own site... can't continue this line of thought without a string drink.
Remember how in 2009, the largest social-media company was MySpace, Yahoo had a billion active users, and Lycos was still alive...? and that was only 11 short internet years ago. Whither SO, indeed. Start archiving and backing up offsite.
 
4:14 PM
I don't reasonably expect my SO content to be useful to me in the distant future. I needed to use something I answered exactly once or twice so far.
 
^^ and as the economy continues to get worse and advertising $$$ disappear, acquisitions become aggressive downvaluations and chainsaw acquisitions...
 
Does anyone have experience with flask-recaptcha? It seems to be the main library for reCAPTCHA V3 but the repo looks a bit... haphazard
 
@AndrasDeak Really? I've had need for >200 of my previous Q&A, and the (large) subset of my Q&A that proved useful after-the-fact, I revise, edit and constantly curate for version changes and deprecations, inasmuch as I have time to.
 
Yeah, the vast majority of my content here is just a hobby
 
@AndrasDeak But think about the rep! All lost like tears in the rain...
 
4:22 PM
@AndrasDeak Hmm, different to other people's experiences. I suppose it depends on whether you're woking on production code, prototype code, hobby code, academic code...
 
yup
 
@MisterMiyagi Tears in some fluid... might be less noble than rain...
 
5:08 PM
hi. any deep learning ppl here
 
@Mahdi_J Depends on your question
 
@smci just wondering if anyone has ever tried to optimize a LSTM model with NEAT
 
@Mahdi_J in case this is about your question from yesterday, we ask that you don't ask for help here with fresh questions on the main site
 
oh. thanks for the heads up
 
@Mahdi_J Clarity in stating questions clearly and concisely helps a lot, also formatting, uppercase, indentation etc.) See the edits I just made to an old 2019 question of yours
@Mahdi_J: also, don't assume everyone knows NEAT, it's useful to provide a citation (is it an algorithm? a package that implements it? both? provide citations to the algorithm and package(s), please. Are you simply trying to use an existing package, or asking people to help you implement an algorithm that does't have a package implementation). And the tag definition of the that you applied is *"Neat is an open source semantic grid framework built on top of Sass and Bourbon."*(!?)...
... if that's even the same thing (algorithm? package? paper?) your'e referring to(!?) If it isn't, then delete that tag reference. If it is, then that tag wiki could use edit for clarity.
In ML/Deep Learning, every week now there's a new groundbreaking algorithm/ paper/ package... you have to do the site janitorial to SO to make sure questions and their tags are stated clearly, noone is going to go google "Which NEAT ios this referring to? Which missing citation should I edit in?".
^ anyway as AD said, have to wait for 48 hours before discussing your quesion here. But it would greatly help it get answers if it was clearly stated and cited.
 
 
1 hour later…
6:45 PM
I'm trying to think what is the most pythonic way of handling arguments to a plugin, which can be populated in a GUI.
The plugins are for motion controllers, each take various arguments to describe the connection, like serial port, baud rate, IP address, etc.
But in the end all provide the same functionality like get_position() and set_position().
I'd like to keep these plugins pure Python. These plugins get used by various applications.
One of which is a PySide2 (Qt) app, and I'd like to populate widgets corresponding to these connection arguments.
 
@joshdoe Can you clarify what you are pondering? Nothing of what you have described seems like argument handling.
 
If I were doing this in all Qt, I would give each plugin a widget() method, that would return a widget containing labels and inputs for whatever is needed, such as COM port and baud rate, or IP address and port. However I don't want these plugins to use Qt, since other apps use the plugins that don't bring in the Qt dependency.
I was trying to think of the cleanest way to auto-populate GUI widgets based on what connection properties are required.
Ugliest way to do this is to if/elif over the plugins, basically manually creating the widgets I'd need for each plugin. Adding a new plugin requires another elif block.
 
This is still pretty vague, but I recommend formulating your own short type/meta system. That might be as simple as just storing a list of parameters. The inspect module, especially inspect.signature, is a good start.
 
Ah, inspect.signature is good to know, interesting, thanks. I could just expect plugins to use consistent names for the connection method parameters, then populate the GUI accordingly
 
7:09 PM
NB: Five days ago: "Let's build a small parser to allow math on the CLI." Today: I'm about to write my first automatically-typed PyParsing compiler. Not sure whether I should rejoice or hit myself.
 
@joshdoe consider ^ that right after the same person recommended that you formulate your own type system :D
 
@MisterMiyagi I have utmost faith and confidence.
 
@AndrasDeak hmm, his name inspires such confidence though. I'm known for overcomplicating problems and solutions...
 
@AndrasDeak I can at least attest that the path traveled so far is safe. As for what lies beyond the veil, well... :D
 
7:28 PM
@MisterMiyagi for some reason your previous message made me look up the (warning: butt-clenching situation but nobody gets hurt) "chainsaw close call" video
 
@PaulMcG I have utmost faith and confidence for the PyParsing part. As for the rest, I'll be sure to be mumbling gloomily here during the week. :P
@AndrasDeak Chainsaws fix everything. Disclaimer: Chainsaws don't fix everything.
@AndrasDeak To put my earlier statement into perspective: Every one of automatic, typed and compiled is easy. Two are difficult. All three, well...
 
7:44 PM
is it essentially some kind of JIT?
 
JIT was last time, for automatic and compiled.
 
Why can't your JIT be typed? Or is "JIT" too 2019 Q2? :P
 
Nah, I was just too lazy last time.
Didn't feel like bootstrapping the entire type-system in good old type-is-an-object-is-a-type fashion.
This time it's mostly primitive types.
Ints, Enums, but fully auto-generated from Python objects.
 
isn't there a PEP for that? :P
 
I realise I'm a vocal advocate of typing in Python here. That's me wearing my practical hat of DevOps and Teaching. My academic hat of Consistency and Correctness compels me to point out that typing is deeply flawed, and everything building on it will hopefully crash and burn before that house of cards gets too big.
Plus, reinventing the wheel is so much fun. :D
 
8:03 PM
Well for one thing, you can end up learning a lot about wheels and wheel design.
 
Fascinating things indeed.
 
<sits all eager for the turn of the hour for a task to run - could speed it up, but let's see the new age in properly!> It was my "last" major fix before I can start deployment. All I needed was to transfer some data to my history table and reset current counters. Simples. --> everything resets, but so did the entire history with it. Just why?!
 
"Simples"?
in any case I'm sorry for your loss :(
 
@AndrasDeak It's a long-running ad campaign in the UK
 
@roganjosh good to hear Jar Jar Binks strong in business...
 
8:16 PM
@AndrasDeak we've had years of this. years.
 
no wonder you lot have gone mad :P
 
It certainly explains a lot! <totally prepared to blame it all on an advert>
 
Ad people love it when furriners talk funny (If you watched the recent series Snowpiercer you may recognize this actor.)
I confess I actually liked this commercial a lot. We quoted him in our house for weeks.
 
I suspect it has a lot to do with stereotyping, just like how they accentuate British accents for baddies in American films. You've heard me speak - I don't suppose I sound much like those films :P
 
are you more on the "u wot m8" side? :P
 
8:32 PM
I may or may not have used that phrase before
 
8:46 PM
Cabbages everyone, I'm trying to scrape a website, mainly the price of certain products, which I can see them, but when I go to the html code all I get is "Specific price depending on the location" could I please get some help regarding how certain class may show when you inspect them in the webpage, but not when you check the source code?
 
javascript, probably
 
It'll probably be loaded by JavaScript or AJAX
 
so the likely answer is selenium rather than requests
 
Hm yeah, there is a .js file in there, I'm accessing through selenium, until I reach the products, then I'm using chrome_driver.page_source and working with that, but the prices disappear
 
disappear?
Or were they never there to begin with
 
8:48 PM
Disappear, because when I inspect the page in the browser selenium opened, I can actually see the numbers and its class
But when I use beautifulsoup to find_all(class_='product_List_price') it returns empty
 
Then I suspect your BS4 search is incorrect but I'm not really familiar with these tools
 
Also, when I use .page_source in the the page selenium ended up (which I can see the prices), in the full html of the page_source, there is no price value, nor the class where it belongs to
I'm pretty sure Andreas is on point
Because I do find some js related stuff, do I also am not familiar with these tools "<script src="/js/fp.catalog.js"></script>"
 
 
1 hour later…
10:07 PM
Am I being silly or does WinSCP not show .env files?
Apparently I am. I didn't realise they were considered hidden files
I guess I'm so used to setting Windows to "show hidden files" immediately on getting a new device, I don't have a concept of what's hidden :)
 
10:58 PM
@roganjosh Doesn't any filename with a . prefix get hidden?
 
Possibly, but I kinda guessed that looking upon the Linux server, it wouldn't be a thing
 
@roganjosh "Oh I'm looking at another filesystem that is a little differently to me, maybe I shouldn't enforce everything I do to myself by default" isn't something Windows really does well..
 
well it should :P
 
"Look at all these hidden things! I'll just fix it by deleting them all"
 
Mar 19 at 14:00, by roganjosh
I had a grandfather that indulged me in computers but would occasionally phone up to say that he found a load of virus files in a "weird folder" - win32 and deleted them all... so stuff stopped working :P
 
11:01 PM
A high-school classmate of mine swore that his pendrive was only allowed to be removed from computers without unmounting it first. He said windows somehow screwed up the file system every time it safely removed it, or when it helpfully "fixed" the file system
 
11:12 PM
Oh, wait, I read the entire opposite of what you said
In which case, I guess they were shooting for the duplication trick for pokemon on the Gameboy
 

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