« first day (3661 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) » 

6:36 AM
blatant dupe; numpy/pandas convert float to int stackoverflow.com/questions/64510575/omit-decimal-value
 
 
3 hours later…
10:50 AM
There's an answer in the Core Dev AMA here that I don't understand. Is he basically saying that the whole data model should be implemented by, effectively, us as programmers?
Actually, maybe he's saying the opposite? I think I'm just confused :P
 
 
4 hours later…
3:11 PM
cbg, just wanted the "The last message was posted 4 hours ago." gone :)
I didnt get around watching the whole video, I wanted to see GvR and he was talking about type hints which I haven't even used :/
 
@python_learner and now it will be there forever
 
ironic now that you mentioned it ;(
 
@roganjosh Sounds like they would prefer having more of a self-hosting approach to Reference-Implementation-Python. Smaller "builtin" core, and more things defined in relation to that, not the host language (aka C).
 
> Gregory P. Smith: ...the most important things to python... are the things python needs itself to bootstrap itself and start up...
He was referring to what Steve Dower said.
 
So that it would be easier to provide Other-Implementation-Python, and maintain What-People-Want-from-Python, because the former would be smaller and the latter more shared/portble.
 
3:18 PM
I'm just posting that as confirmation of your message.
 
Ok, that makes perfect sense when I listen back to it from that angle, thanks
I think it was the mention of dunders that threw me a bit because that felt pretty core to me
 
@BožoStojković No worries, though so. I'm just slow at typing today and didn't want to throw away my half-done message. :P
 
@MisterMiyagi Yeah, at first I was thinking you were re-iterating your message to me as an explanation. Later I realized it's just a continuation. Hehe
 
3:37 PM
It was interesting seeing that a question was asked by Torxed, which I assume is the guy I know from the main tag. Sometimes I get the "huh, small world" feeling despite there being an endless sea of people programming in Python now :)
 
In python ,is there a way for fully mapping and managing rx/tx ring buffers in userspace?
 
3:48 PM
@roganjosh Despite the probability, I think we just like to see more than one reference or connection to a single person. Could be something that's wired in us about seeing the ability to reach a person from multiple "angles", which benefits us socially somehow.
 
@BožoStojković True, but then the first google result for searching that name also points directly at the same person, as do several of the others on the first page. So I think it's a pretty high chance :P
 
That's why I said despite the probability. It's just the way our brain works I guess :)
 
The same couldn't be said if you searched for my SO name, for instance!
 
Laurel! I googled your nick and am amused
You are so popular, there is a recipe on you
 
@BožoStojković and while much of that is probably true and extensively studied, I suspect that it's just a fact that we're hanging out in the types of places where you'll get a high concentration of people who are deeply interested in the language, rather than it just being a tool that's used and then you go home and never think about it
It's only the same if you do academic circuits with conferences, for example. You'll meet the same people multiple times if they're actively studying in your field
Or any conference, I suppose. I haven't been to any big programming ones but I assume I'd meet people I've known from SO if I did
 
3:58 PM
@roganjosh Now that you explicitly mention that, it gives me an idea why "It's a small world" is wired inside us. Of course, meeting someone in multiple places means you have some common interests with that person and could be socially compatible with them.
 
But maybe that's seeking to find causation at a level it doesn't exist. It's just a byproduct of us liking the same sort of things and there being a limited number of events
Anyway, it's not something I'm really qualified to talk about other than random conjecture :P
 
I'm just thinking about the origin of the effect that causes us to be stumped at situations like that.
Could be we've had a bit of a quid-pro-quo right there. You're talking about something along the lines of social situations and gatherings having a high chance of meeting people you already met because you have common interests with a group of people in that situation. Whereas I'm talking about origins of our feelings toward meeting same people in different situations (producing the "Wow, small world" effect, as in the feeling that you get when you find yourself in that kind of situation).
 
4:14 PM
But is the "chance" meeting not just a logical deduction from your experience of life? You interact with thousands and thousands of people
 
Again, you're misunderstanding what I want to convey :P I might be communicating unclearly. I'm not talking about chance to meet someone. I'm just referring to the feeling you get when you meet someone you already met and have a need to say "Oh, hello, small world"
 
I don't think I'm missing your point, but maybe I'm addressing it poorly. I'd argue that the "feeling" is just generic surprise at an unexpected effect, but you have enough metadata from your experiences to actually attribute it to a specific circumstance that causes your suprise
 
> the "feeling" is just generic surprise at an unexpected effect
Oh, you have a good point there. Haven't thought about it being that simple.
 
In other words, I don't think the physiological response is unique at all. It's just that you can put it in context
 
Not sure I follow. Of course it's not unique, it's pretty widespread. Also, can you elaborate more on how "context" is having a play here? I might be missing something pretty simple.
Oh, wait, I think I understand why you said it's not unique. It's just that it's one of many types of surprises, right?
 
4:26 PM
Yep. "I interact with thousands and thousands of people, you live on the other side of the world, but it's you again that I've bumped into?!". The reality (like 6 degrees of separation) is relatively easily explained, but we have an innate ability to understand quantities; even babies that can't speak can be surprised when the number of things don't add up [citation needed - searching]
 
Ahh I see.
 
Note: annoying amount of ads but this cites a lot of studies about baby math
 
I don't see any ads. Yay ad-blocker :P
Hmm.. I don't like that the test image was substantially different from the habituation image. It should've depicted the same objects, just different amounts.
It doesn't mention to what extent they used the standard objects as opposed to deviant objects.
 
I think I read/heard somewhere that this is why babies are so entertained by peak-a-boo because you reinforce their innate understanding that you'll re-emerge with only one head (paraphrased). Adding an extra prosthetic head while hiding is probably not a good idea
 
Hmm that's interesting
 
4:36 PM
Although, that would be traumatising on lots of levels, so signal-to-noise is probably quite low :P
Or maybe that was more around the concept of object permanence than quantities
 
Laurel. I hope the babies that were test subjects weren't left with innate sense of people having differing amount of heads each time they saw them.
@roganjosh Well that would make more sense to me actually
 
@roganjosh I thought it was about object permanence
i.e. young enough kids will think you're gone from this universe when they can't see you
 
I think it was between a couple of lines. Like, you take a teddy, make them aware of it, then hide it, then reveal two teddies and they go "what the yam?"
 
yeah, that's another one
that's the "can babies count" angle the linked article discusses
There's also an age range when they can comprehend small numbers but not volume proportionality. So if you have two cookies and the kid has one cookie and protests, you can break their cookie in two, "See, now you also have two cookies" and they'll be content with that outcome.
 
Ooo, I didn't know that one
 
4:45 PM
Child brains are fascinating :) There are a lot of exciting experiments, probably also on youtube. Put a toddler on a table with a glass inlay, and smaller babies will just crawl across it. Older ones will stop on the edge of the glass, careful not to fall off into the perceived gap.
there's also the fun "baby sees mother's identical twin sister for the first time" video :)
 
I've mentioned it before but on the subject of YouTube, if you didn't know, Mind Field released all their episodes for free (they may since have made more that aren't). They're epic.
 
Never heard of it (I may have forgotten your mention :P). I'll try not to forget to look it up, thanks
 
@roganjosh Ooh that's awesome
I must do a marathon on it :P
 
@AndrasDeak I mentioned it a while back because they actually put people through the Trolley Problem scenario and (maybe because I'm a geek) I felt I was living through it with them as they had to make their decision. In others they have people in pain from a laser pointer thinking it's a treatment, and they put kids through a fake MRI and it fixes debilitating conditions. It's crazy good.
 
fake MRI is doubly fake treatment...
 
4:53 PM
(they also go through ethics boards - it's not some hack job lol)
@AndrasDeak that one is to kids. But in reality I think there'd be a lot of adults that would fall for that
 
5:52 PM
@Janith As far as I know everything in Python is in userspace. As for the "ring buffer" part, you might be able to just use collections.deque(maxsize=ringsize).
 
6:27 PM
@roganjosh It's not a matter of falling for things. The placebo effect is even observed among subjects sho have been told their treatment is placebo!
 
@DzITC hello to you too. Please see the room rules in regards to linking to questions on main (you should wait at least 48 hours). In addition, please don't approach chat as a solution factory
 
6:47 PM
@holdenweb That's where things start to get spooky because computers can see things our intuition can't (if there's enough data)
 
7:16 PM
Computers can see things we physically can't too, though arguably only because of limited processing power. Computers are beginning to "see around corners" by analysing the impact on a scene of reflected light from out-of-scene objects. I don't know how much further this has gone in the last eight years.
 
7:27 PM
I must say you stumble onto some really interesting convosations here
 
 
1 hour later…
8:32 PM
 

« first day (3661 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) »