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12:40 AM
I answered a C# question today that almost reached my top 10 answers...and I don't even do C#. I just extrapolate from Java.
 
 
3 hours later…
3:32 AM
Hello world.
 
 
1 hour later…
4:39 AM
Cbg
 
5:10 AM
Cabbage
 
 
2 hours later…
6:47 AM
Cabbage
 
7:05 AM
morning cbg
 
 
1 hour later…
8:08 AM
cbg
 
8:22 AM
cbg
I bumped into someone in a bar yesterday that apparently works as a consultant in cryptography and is an ethical hacker. While listening to them explain the stuff they do, I asked a question of whether some issue was due to floating point error. They didn't know what that was. Am I right in assuming that everything they said was tosh? :)
 
cbg
@roganjosh I'd imagine they mostly don't deal with floating point things?
I know a lot of developers who don't do a lot of work with heavy floating point content
 
If you work in computers to the point you are apparently employed as a white hat hacker, surely you've at least encountered floating point?
 
Well yes, but there's a lot of really obscure things about floats
 
Oh, I don't profess to know about them properly, but I do know that they're not exact, which apparently this person didn't
 
For the most part the security work I've done at places we didn't run into much that had any connection to floats. I do think it's worth knowing at least the basics of floats
knowing that they are not exact is something I'd hope more people knew
 
8:35 AM
I wish I could remember the issue they were talking about :/ The conversation was overridden in my mind by them not knowing floating point issues. Perhaps it's not a fair assumption to make on my mind but my b******t meter went into overdrive
 
not knowing that floats are inexact is a gap in knowledge that's unfortunate
But something to keep in mind, I worked at an IoT company at one point, did a lot of Python and a lot of embedded/systems and firmware. There was a product used in multiple countries with a lot of users and not a single float was written by us in any of those systems. In fact many of the embedded chips didn't even support floats at all!
 
That's an interesting perspective
 
I do think knowing the basics of floating point is an absolutely crucial piece of knowledge for a professional developer however
 
Maybe I've conflated two things and assumed you can't get to the point of hacking systems without knowing at least something about floating point but maybe there's a career path to understanding systems in enough depth to hack them without ever encountering floating point
 
I think a lot of systems, like the one I mentioned, just don't have floating points as part of the attack surface
Now granted not all systems are like that
 
8:43 AM
IIRC the discussion was about changing values in HTML and submitting it to a server
I seem to remember there being a scam on a bidding site where you could only submit bids if the value was higher than the existing bid, but you could just edit the form with F12 before submitting and end up bidding one cent. The exploit we were talking about was something along those lines.
But server-side validation failed
Classic client-side validation toppling over
 
9:09 AM
@roganjosh who knows. For what it's worth most people learn about practical float errors the first time they're bitten by them. On the other hand all sorts of jokers like to call themselves white hat hackers
 
That's the problem with meeting people in bars
I think I'm gonna keep using it as a yard-stick of whether they are trying to sound impressive
 
 
1 hour later…
10:13 AM
@roganjosh I'd be suspicious too. But yeah, there's still plenty of hardware that has no floating-point support in the CPU. Before the Pentium, it was normal for CPUs (from microprocessors to mainframes) to only do integer arithmetic, they'd use library code to handle floats. If you wanted FP support in hardware you got a more expensive system that had a floating-point chip.
 
You see that a lot in many microcontrollers, for example a lot of the atmel lower end chips
 
You really don't see floating-point issues unless you do arithmetic and start comparing values exactly
 
@AndrasDeak my suspicion was not based so much on whether they encountered such issues but whether you could have enough domain knowledge to do the job they say they do without knowing that computers don't handle numbers the same way we do
 
They probably can...
 
Hmm is there an alternative for bing and google?
Which isn't operating from the US?
 
10:22 AM
BTW, floats themselves are exact binary numbers, it's not like they're fuzzy. :) But of course that means that a decimal fraction can't usually be exactly converted to a float, unless it's a perfect binary fraction, like a / (2**b) for integers a & b, with b small enough. And yes, a lot of float operations can lose precision, especially if you try to do arithmetic on numbers that aren't roughly the same size.
 
@PM2Ring cbg,
 
If someone's doing stuff with numbers & HTML I assume they have some exposure to JavaScript. And in JavaScript all numbers are stored as floats, so they should have some familiarity with floating-point issues. Of course, it's also possible in JavaScript to work with strings of digits, and that may be all you need if you don't need to do arithmetic on those numbers.
 
All numbers are stored as float in JS?
 
Is there some way of doing fixed integer operations in javascript? This has been bothering me for years
 
10:25 AM
I asked this in another chat, but since you weren't there, talking about fractions, is there a term in English for the operation a / b => ca / cb
 
@PM2Ring We ought to go for a 30-number system, then at least any fraction of 2,3 & 5 can be represented exact.
Binary allows only fractions of 2, so it's in that aspect not a neat numbering system.
 
@PM2Ring in Finnish, Hungarian, German we have a single word: ~"expansion" / ~"widening" and verbs like "expand, widen"
 
@AnttiHaapala rationalizing?
 
It's not an expansion though? You're multiplying numerator and denominator by a constant?
Or am I misunderstanding the example?
 
10:27 AM
actually "rationalizing" isn't quite right i don't think
 
by a positive (integer, or not, or whatever) constant.
 
linear transformation?
 
@shuttle87 rationalizing is the process of resolving cognitive bias :P
@paul23 no
 
Gosh, I think there is a term but I'm struggling to find it
 
$f(x) \rarrow c \cdot f(x)$ is a linear transformation of $f$
 
10:29 AM
@paul23 yes, this is not that, read again what Antti asked
 
@paul23 the value stays the same :D
 
you could say "identity" to which I'd just frown
 
Hmm do you know the german term?
 
maybe this is a time for math.se?
 
(I do know german, finnish.. not so much)
 
10:30 AM
@shuttle87 it's probably been asked either there or on english
 
It's curious that it has a name in other languages to suggest "widening" because I don't see it in that way
 
the opposite is called simplification in Hungarian
 
oh that in Dutch we don't have a name for that operation, it just "happens"
 
I'm not sure there's a unique good name for the concept, it's pretty artificial
 
10:31 AM
well in Finnish it is more like contraction, in German: Kürzen.
 
sounds like shortening
 
because I was explaining how to do comparison of fractions in unlimited integer math only and couldn't find words how to explain it in English succinctly
@AndrasDeak yes the German one does, in Finnish it is more about widening and sort of making the area or width become smaller
 
"multiply with a unity fraction like this..." is how my prof used to explain it when someone asked "how the hell he converted that division to remove powers from the nominator".
 
ah that's nice :D
not as nice as German/Hungarian/Finnish of course but
 
of course :P
 
10:37 AM
though,
@paul23 unity fraction doesn't mean that :/
 
no, just "multiply by unity"
 
Hmm the profs tended to quickly go over it, often annoyed that we even asked it.
 
so think about it,
 
(Yet to me those kind of multiplication always "get" me as I forget/don't quickly see them in time).
 
10:38 AM
we were taught a word for this in the primary school :D
the same word that is used all the way through academia
 
@paul23 because you don't have a name for it!
 
like, why are Finns so punctual (usually, not me:)
 
things like: de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erweitern#Algebra how would I ever expect to multiply that division by (a-b)
 
@AnttiHaapala that reminds me of "surds". I don't think I've ever encountered the term outside of school
 
could it be because we have a word for "making it in time"
 
10:40 AM
I'm also certain you can't distinguish the twenty different kinds of snow, can you?
 
@AndrasDeak I can
 
@AndrasDeak Weren't that the eskimos?
 
Esimerkkejä lunta tarkoittavista suomen kielen sanoista. ajolumi: tuulen kuljettamaa kuivaa lunta jasa, lumenviipymä hanki: paksu maata peittävä lumivaippa tai kantavaksi kovettunut lumivaipan pinta hankiainen: kantavaksi kovettunut lumivaipan pinta (ks. kantohanki, kestohanki, hankikanne, hankikanto) hiutale, (jää)neulanen, (lumi)kide: lumikiteitä; kide-sana on alun perin tarkoittanut juuri lumikidettä huove, höty: leudon sään huokoistama lumi huurre, härmä, kuura: pakkasen ilmankosteudesta eri pintoihin muodostamat kiteet, huurre usein pieniä kiteitä, vrt. huuru, pieniä vesipisaroita, kuura...
 
> Surd may refer to:

Surd, Hungary
@paul23 I'm talking about you now
 
yes?
 
10:42 AM
> tykkilumi: keinotekoinen lumi, esimerkiksi laskettelurinteiden lumetukseen tehty lumi
tykkylumi: puun oksille härmistymällä kerääntynyt lumi
@Antti now you're just trolling ^
 
@AndrasDeak bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/maths/number/surdsrev1.shtml I don't think it's suspicious that the vast majority of the search results point to learning material for exams
 
@AndrasDeak tykki = cannon
 
remind me not to ever try to learn Finnish
 
tykkylumi
 
@paul23 We had a 60-based system, courtesy of the Babylonians & Chaldeans. It was the standard in science for millennia, before it got replaced by those upstart decimals. :)
 
10:42 AM
Hmm how close is Finnish to Danish?
 
lumitykki => tykkilumi
 
@paul23 not at all
 
@paul23 Finniish is in a different language group. It's like asking how close is Dutch to French. Only worse :)
 
@paul23 Finnish is not an Indo-European language
 
@PM2Ring that reminds me to submit a PR to the World Government to have 10 squarts in an hour
 
10:44 AM
Dutch is very close to French :D
 
Dutch is German+English so basically French, right?
 
^ cannot parse
 
of course it is much closer to German and English being a Germanic language
 
Well dutch is actually quite close (according to linguistics) to old english, though I have yet to discover that.
 
@Antti curious how there's no "lumi" entry in that wiki list. So what does that mean?
 
10:45 AM
English was always my worst subject at highschool, by a far far margin.
 
@AnttiHaapala I just grabbed an example of 2 languages that have a geographical connection but aren't very similar, but of course those 2 are both Indo-European languages.
 
@AndrasDeak "snow"
 
lol
 
unqualified
 
10:46 AM
is tykkylumi hoarfrost?
 
so "tykky" is actually a word by itself with no other meaning but stupid southern people wouldn't understand that
 
btw what language group does Finnish historically belong to? Cyrillic?
 
@AnttiHaapala nah, I get that
 
@paul23 Cyrillic is a writing system :D you mean "Slavic" and the answer is "No"
 
@paul23 eh :D
 
10:47 AM
there are related languages that are written in Cyrillic in Russia
 
Finnish is a sublanguage of Hungarian :>
 
the closest group that Finnish belongs to are Finnic languages
 
-.-
 
I can pretty much understand most in written Finnic languages.
the bigger group would be Uralic languages
and... of course this is meaningless because Uralic languages is a wide group, the Uralic languages Finnish and Hungarian have as much in common as do the Indo-European languages English and Gujarati.
 
Hey, we have hal/kala
 
10:53 AM
Gujarati (; ગુજરાતી gujarātī [ɡudʒəˈɾɑːt̪i]) is an Indo-Aryan language native to the Indian state of Gujarat. It is part of the greater Indo-European language family. Gujarati is descended from Old Gujarati (circa 1100–1500 AD). In India, it is the official language in the state of Gujarat, as well as an official language in the union territories of Daman and Diu and Dadra and Nagar Haveli. As of 2011, Gujarati is the 6th most widely spoken language in India by number of native speakers, spoken by 55.5 million speakers which amounts to about 4.5% of the total Indian population. It is the 26th most...
hand => hāth
seven => sāt
 
Aww
 
see :d even more evidence ;)
 
You're tearing me apart, brother
 
Hmm was Finland ever influenced by the Huns and the great movement that occurred?
 
10:56 AM
9 mins ago, by Andras Deak
is tykkylumi hoarfrost?
 
@AndrasDeak no.
 
mass migration
 
hoarfrost is kuura
 
@AnttiHaapala odd that you should mention JRRT because I completely lost track of this conversation and my mind-wandering led to "YOU CANNOT PARSE" as a phrase. I need to find some JSON questions to use that cheap pun.
 
OK, thanks
 
10:58 AM
@AndrasDeak they cannot have a word for it in English because it doesn't even occur in southern Finland :D
apparently Wikipedia calls it "Crown snow-load"
 
@roganjosh Finally someone uses the right quote
 
@roganjosh :D
 
By necessity. "Shall not" doesn't really work :)
 
@roganjosh kevin'd by da intertubularity
 
So disappointing :/ They used the wrong quote so I'm still claiming original thought here
 
11:01 AM
> Soft rime is similar in appearance to hoar frost; but whereas rime is formed by vapour first condensing to liquid droplets (of fog, mist or cloud) and then attaching to a surface, hoar frost is formed by direct deposition from water vapour to solid ice.
A heavy coating of hoar frost, called white frost, is very similar in appearance to soft rime, but the formation process is different: it happens when there is no fog, but very high levels of air relative humidity (above 90%) and temperatures below −8 °C (17.6 °F).
 
@AnttiHaapala "is there a term in English for the operation a / b => ca / cb" Not that I know of, but the reverse operation is called reduction, or cancellation. OTOH, if you said "expand a / b to ca / cb" most English-speaking mathematicians would accept that terminology without a problem.
 
So when I say "hoar frost" I may be calling it wrong
 
@PM2Ring that's such a basic thing I should know. That's what happens when all my JS is basically written by someone else :P
 
@AndrasDeak actually I might have confused tehse too: vapour => ice: kuura, water => ice: huurre
 
11:05 AM
Don't get flagged :P
 
ah no,
 
@roganjosh If you're a Tolkien fan, I recommend browsing the Tolkien stuff at scifi.stackexchange.com There are several Tolkien experts there with encyclopedic knowledge.
 
@PM2Ring Yeah, I've seen a few of them from HNQs. It's easier to get my info there than get through The Silmarillion
I was having a separate conversation with my friend that doesn't program. It's ended with Gandalf the Grey Hat. I think that's a perfect conversational circle from my opening remarks this morning before I head out :)
 
12:16 PM
@PM2Ring When I ran this script on windows, the rel path worked (which was rigged with the script's directory as a starting point), on linux, it didn't, and using os.getcwd() it returned my venv/bin/ directory.
@PM2Ring if you mean something like (x+2)/(x-2) => (x-1)(x+2)/(x-1)(x-2) I'm familiar with that as "multiplying by 1."
 
yeah, that's the thing
 
12:48 PM
hello guys
how are you doing here
any one with the idea of creating a postgres stored procedure in python using Psycopg2?
without running it manually?
That's my code, but it doesn't create a function or procedure to the database
 
Looking at that SQL and seeing some pandas answers is the definition of being stuck between a rock and a hard place for me.
 
@rogan
have you ever encountered it ?
 
@PM2Ring I had to read into what mojibake was, very interesting. Trying to think of what practical use there is for it.
 
\o cbg
 
1:00 PM
Please use external paste tools for long snippets of code sopython.com/chatroom
 
@LutaayaHuzaifahIdris No, sorry. This is way beyond me. You might be better asking on the main site.
 
1:12 PM
Also, please don't ask about your recent question from the main site. Please see our room rules.
 
@davidism it's showing me that the question was removed. Has that just happened?
I don't have the rep to see any details
 
self-delete
 
Was it downvoted?
 
No, but why does it matter?
 
Maybe my suggestion to ask on the main site was wrong. Seems like a complex problem so maybe it needs to be boiled down to something more fundamental
 
1:18 PM
Pay attention to the username. It's pretty clearly a q banned user trying to get around the ban by asking in chat or with a new main account.
 
roganjosh can't see the name of the asker
 
^ I'm not sure what I should be seeing
 
nothing :P
and we've explored this issue in every possible aspect
 
I draw the conclusion I need to answer more questions about input() returning a string. Rocket my way to new privileges :P
 
2:13 PM
stackoverflow.com/q/51634616 duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/14105452, second guessed myself and reopened, but it actually is a dupe
Alternatively it's a typo: comments -> commentss
 
DSM
2:25 PM
Mid-morning-meeting cabbage for all.
 
cabbage
 
3:15 PM
cbg
@DSM have you got what the OP is asking on that "merge" lists thingy... might be I'm tired and not run the existing code, but umm....
 
DSM
Which one?
 
@DSM one you commented on an answer on here
 
DSM
Oh, yeah. I think the OP really is just asking for a less ugly (non-index based) version of his code. My own answer would have been something like [next(its[m]) for m in mask] after making its, so it's not different enough from the existing answer to write separately.
 
4:03 PM
Could someone help me improve my answer? I wrote it and feel like there is a better way to show what they are trying to do. stackoverflow.com/questions/51636577/…
 
Hello Guys, Can anyone please help me with splitting strings,
If I need to split a text for ex: aeirs01.us.xxx.com and want to read only 'aeirs01'. Can we do split('.') here? I don't know exactly how to extract the content before the first '.'
 
s.partition('.')[0]
 
Read up on lists if you're not familiar with them yet.
Because I'm reading your question as "I see that mystring.split(".") returns a list of strings. How do I get the first element of that list?" and getting a particular element out of a list is a common operation
 
Can I create an if else statement with this condition? There are few texts which doesn't have any '.'
Will this work?
        if '.' in self.ciname:
            user = self.ciname.partition('.')[0]
            return user
        else:
            return self.ciname
 
Did it work when you tried it?
 
4:16 PM
@Kevin I know Kevin, But I m running with few conditions within it so I am trying with different approaches
 
Don't be afraid to try things to see if they work :-)
 
@Kevin Ah! I guess it did work. I am analyzing data here so will need to confirm after checking few of them manually.
 
an MCVE can also benefit yourself, you know
use a controlled example where you can see what's going on
 
@Kevin Yep! this is what I'm doing all this time during scripting. Keep on trying with different approaches. But, Just wanted someone to confirm it you know :)
@Kevin I have just started learning Python, So it gets hard sometimes or I should say most of the times :P
@AndrasDeak Yeah! I thought about it. But I am almost to the end of my code. If it works, I'll save a bit of time :)
 
I'd say you save the most time by understanding the fundamentals of the language as early as possible, but it's your work and your call
 
4:22 PM
It gets easier to make logical inferences about the behavior of your program, with time. Reading the language specification helps a lot.
You could, in principle, deduce the exact behavior of if '.' in self.ciname: without ever running a line of code, if you know where to look
 
@AndrasDeak You're right!
 
also check what happens if the string doesn't have any '.' in it, and whether the else clause is necessary at all
 
Asking for confirmation in chat is fine, within reason... But at the very least, you should phrase it in a way that it's evident you have a theory already. "how do I get the first part of a string with split?" is not as good as "I'm thinking of using mystring.split(".")[0] to get the first part of a string, is there any reason I shouldn't do it that way?"
 
@Kevin Got it! I'll keep this in mind next time whenever I ask on chat :)
@AndrasDeak Sure!
 
4:38 PM
Hi, @KaranM With that question I answered for you on the main site a few weeks ago, and each time since then that you've come to this chat room with a problem, it seems to be around very similar issues regarding the splitting of strings. I agree with Kevin that it's good to try things and see what happens, but it can be frustrating if you just try things at random until you hit on something that works. I think you need to spend some solid time working through a good Python tutorial.
You can't learn a language by just skimming the docs looking for stuff that will solve your immediate problem. You need to be methodical: start with the very basics, and work up. As you learn each a new thing, write some code to test it out. If you do this, gradually you'll build a solid knowledge base and you'll begin to develop a good sense of how to turn your ideas into code.
At the moment, it appears that you're stumbling in the dark. ;) We're happy to help you, but we can't learn those fundamentals for you, and until you gain those fundamentals there's not a lot that we can teach you.
 
@PM2Ring I know reading. I have to invest time in reading about the Python fundamentals more. I keep reading questions on SO, and you guys have definitely helped me a lot here. But, I can't understand anything when I read Python documentation, It doesn't have those relevant examples that can be used in a code. Atleast, I couldn't really understand from it. Do you have any good Python tutorial at the moment, to start with some basic and useful operations that will help?
 
@MooingRawr mojibake happens when people are confused about how encoding / decoding works. To be fair, it's easy to mess that stuff up if you're not clear on what you're doing. One of the good things about Python 3 is the clear separation between text strings and bytes strings. In Python 2, that distinction isn't so clear, and as a result there's a ton of old code that works ok on pure ASCII, or on Latin-1 text, but the moment it hits anything outside that zone it starts churning out mojibake.
It's still possible to produce mojibake in Python 3, but it's much less likely, unless you're completely clueless. :) Trying to decode it can be a fun puzzle...
 
@KaranM because that's not what a documentation is for. Read a tutorial instead, as PM suggested. Those are designed to teach you the basics.
You wouldn't try to learn C++ by reading the standard, would you?
 
@KaranM The official tutorial is good, although it's aimed at people who already know how to program in another language. Did you have any programming experience before coming to Python?
 
@PM2Ring No. :(
 
4:52 PM
@KaranM Ok. The tutorial is still worth reading, but you probably need something that's aimed at beginners. We have a short list here.
 
@PM2Ring Thanks for sharing it! I will definitely start reading more. :)
 
BTW, I agree that it would be nice if the official docs had more examples. They do have a few, but it wouldn't hurt for them to have a lot more. Even the tutorial could do with more examples, but as I said before, it doesn't aim to teach programming, so it assumes that the reader doesn't need to see examples for everything.
 
@PM2Ring Yeah! And when I try to look for some similar examples somewhere else, I get lost and give up eventually.
 
Guys, I need help with a help vampire here: stackoverflow.com/questions/51637235/…
Wasted an hour of my time, keeps giving and taking away accepted answer, keeps bugging me with vague questions
 
I find that OPs quit bugging me with follow up questions when I stop replying to them
 
5:01 PM
Will do. I regret even trying to help in the first place lol
 
cbg o/
 
@RushabhMehta That question is too vague and too broad. It's great that you want to be helpful, but you need to be a bit more discriminating in what questions you respond to. And now you know why we close questions like that. ;)
 
5:21 PM
@RushabhMehta relevant reading meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43478/…
 
DSM
5:48 PM
@MartijnPieters: my comment not having had the desired effect :-), please update your transcript in that unicode question from the other day. It looks like you did an in-place edit, and the last two lines after "demo" aren't accurate; missing print(.
 
@KaranM it sounds like you need to be more confident in trying things out yourself. Just remember that it's hard to make your computer explode, and commands that wipe your data are usually obvious. Beyond that, just test your understanding of documentation out.
Documentation can only go so far, there's also an element of trying things out to learn
 
6:06 PM
@DSM ah, so that's what you meant!
@DSM: better now?
 
DSM
Both syntactically valid and actually likely to generate that output, so I'm happy. :-)
 
6:19 PM
@DSM if you really wanted to reproduce it and double-check, remember to take the previous revision of the file; the project fixed their mistake.
 
6:43 PM
@roganjosh Thanks! :D
 
@KaranM <insert long disclaimer here if the computer does actually explode> But it's a point I think is often missed in a lot of advice. Documentation and tutorials are fine, but you need to be hitting errors from random and even bizarre things you try yourself.
 
@roganjosh Yes I have been doing that since all this time, and of course SO community has helped me a lot. It has barely been 3 months since I started scripting. And so far, I have been able to develop quite a useful scripts, and this has happened only by trial and error method. Although, sometimes, I may get impatient and start asking some silly and basic questions here.
 
Ok, that I can absolutely sympathise with. I'm not sure what my advice would be there.
 
7:21 PM
Hi Guys. Is this concept of pooling (multi-threading) right? The code works good, but after 1500 or 2000 iterations the code no longer continues (deadlock?)
'''Main function'''
if __name__ == "__main__":
    p = Pool(4)
    p.map(parseAndSave, glob.glob(PATH_XML+"*.xml"))
    p.close()
    for file in glob.glob(PATH_XML+"*.xml"):
        parseAndSave(file)
 
Why are you using a multiprocessing pool and then calling the very same function outside of the pool?
 
@roganjosh what you mean exactly?
 
What does parseAndSave do? I'm unclear on how you could map it to some data in a multiprocessing pool and then still have a requirement to call exactly the same function in a loop.
 
@roganjosh its working on txts and xmls files, but there are more than 9000 files
 
That doesn't answer my question. It looks like you have a duplication of effort.
 
7:32 PM
@roganjosh you mean I should only take p.map or the for loop ?
 
From what I can see, yes :)
 
Ok I will try it out now. :)
 
8:04 PM
Yay! It builds! Apparently python3.7 isn't supported on Travis yet.
 
8:17 PM
hello, quick question how do I define a class from the python command line?
 
what is the python command line?
 
the console window that comes up when I run python on windows
it has the >>> on the left where you enter commands
 
Ok, I know what you're referring to. Why would you ever need to create a class there?
 
I'm following this example step by step depends-on-the-definition.com/…
and I got to the part where he says to create a class...but didn't show where or how to store it
 
I've skimmed it but he also has command-line numbers against his code
 
8:23 PM
I never noticed those
 
Which means he's/she's using an IDE
 
ah
maybe I could use visual studio
 
You really cannot work with classes in REPL (I mean, you can, but it's so horribly impractical that you can't)
 
whats REPL...the thing I'm trying to use now?
 
Read, evaluate , print.... then "let's go again" (loop)
 
8:27 PM
ok, installing python tools for VS, will try it there
 
8:40 PM
@erotavlas If you are just trying to run this one example you can also use an online repl. The window on the right is the repl, the left one can be used to write/execute a script.
 
the code uses a local file, will it be able to load it?
oh nevermind looksl ike teres an upload function...cool
 
yeah, you can upload a full project there. I haven't tried to install third party libraries yet, but I'd guess it's also possible.
TIL Yes you can, but not with import pip; pip.main(['install', 'stuff']). You have to use their package manager on the left left.
 
9:00 PM
I was trying to do

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
 
@erotavlas numpy and pandas are not part of the standard library
 
that's true
 
ok, I don't understand that traceback, someone else might be able to answer
 
theres an icon on the left side that looks like a box, I typed numpy in the field and it gave a list of packages that match that name
 
9:15 PM
ok nevermind got it working...those were just benign errors according to this post stackoverflow.com/questions/40845304/…
 

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