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12:39 AM
whoa that's cool
I'm not sure how fast it is, but downloading 1.1GB in 50sec and installing / upgrading a whole distro in less than 30min is good change
 
 
1 hour later…
2:08 AM
@Mikhail anti-patterns would be anti-patterns in any language
 
2:37 AM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix wuuuut. I've never heard of that happening. Maybe for an older mobo that's sat around for a while. But not for a new one.
Or a mobo that's been collecting dust for a while maybe.
 
3:41 AM
@Mysticial same thought but the mobo has the latest firmware preinstalled. I did notice some crusty sound while inserting the memory in some slots and after blowing them with a pipe (knowing humidity isn't much better) things got resolved for the other slots
But when inserting the memory sticks, I noticed a sound so possibly it could be some kind of factory dust
 
4:10 AM
@Mikhail Antipattern 1: Using C++. Antipattern 2: trying to use an alternative, because you're sure it just has to be better.
 
5:00 AM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix Interesting...
Sounds a bit suspicious actually. Factory sealed should be dust free.
Btw, Prime Day discounts, I ordered PSU, case, and AIO for my 3950X build in September. But it'll sit for a couple months.
 
what PSU?
 
A very shitty one due to space constraints:
 
Video Card: I have a spare GTX 1050 RGB sitting around.
Storage: I have my stash of SSDs that I hoarded a few months ago.
Mobo: Out of stock. Will wait until September to see if any more X570 mATX models show up.
Ram: No good deals on Amazon right now. Waiting on OC reports to decide what I need. Better to wait until CPU is here since risk of incompatibility is high in case I need to return memory.
 
You're wasting pcie lanes with a gpu :-)
 
5:09 AM
RGB Fans: No good deals on Amazon. Connector availability is unclear until the AIO arrives since it comes with a controller.
 
so RGB controller aren't standardized right?
 
RGB Strip(s): I have a couple spares sitting around, but they're 5-pin RGBW and aren't compatible with the RGB-only Asrock mobo. No good deals on Amazon. Likewise, connector compatibility is unclear at this point.
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix Cooler Master is like the one company that uses standard connectors.
The AIO I ordered is: amazon.com/gp/product/B079K244KZ
The review videos confirm it's standard connectors. But I can't quite tell from the video how many of each connector is available. Likewise, I'm unsure of the mobo integration of that controller.
 
After watching linus tech tips, I got worried about AIO
I guess they're good when space is restricted mostly
but they do look nice and make it less clumsy inside
 
Am I missing anything besides the 3950X (which isn't in the database yet)?
Memory is undecided.
Oh right, fans and RGB strips.
 
for the Ryzen 3950X 105W is the max power consumed or "normal" usage
 
5:25 AM
fuck I overwrote it.
updated
3 x RGB fans for top and back. 2 x ML120 to put on the push side of the radiator for extra power.
 
Are that many fan really necessary? My TR is running most of the day now and it's still colder than my notebook
not that notebook can really dissipate heat easily
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix The top and back fans are for airflow.
The ML120s on the back of the radiator may not be necessary if I can't overclock anyway. But they would help with achieving positive pressure.
Since otherwise, there's 2 in, 3 out - all of roughly the same power. The 2 in behind in front of a radiator to add resistance.
The video card and PSU will also be outflows.
The RGB fan (weak pull) + radiator + ML120 (strong push) is a setup I run in two of my machines.
Might be overkill for the 3950X if it won't overclock. But it might still help with PBO if it's temperature based.
 
5:47 AM
I see you spend time on making your builds nice. Why don't you remove the gpu? Might overclock faster.
 
@Mikhail I found out that taking out the GPU makes the monitors not show anything.
 
btw, does AIO really use water?
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix some liquid. Likely water with additives to prevent corrosion.
 
I'm probably wrong on this, but if you use water, there isn't much you can do to prevent corrosion. Some kind of oil would be a better.
 
I think you're right actually.
 
6:01 AM
Maybe consider build a DIY water cooling system using water, ice and the fact that 4 degrees Celsius is the densest.
 
I put an anti-rust agent into my water jacket incubators, and run them on regular water.
Had some dream to check the air flow temperature with a FLIR thermal camera. Although I think it can only sense surfaces.
 
6:17 AM
@Rick Just the style guide of being non-cryptic...
 
6:30 AM
@Mikhail yes, airflow would be cool but you only see not exactly "surface" but heat emission so no through wall heat vision either
 
The statement is 50% true. There exists equipment that can visualize the frequency shift due to thermal vibration modes, which will let you see the temperature. But yes, its not the FLIR micro-bolometer array.
 
7:11 AM
Also fuck nvidia npp (and the intel lib they knocked off) for using signed integers for a histogram data type. Histogram bins should unsigned!
 
 
3 hours later…
9:50 AM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix oxidizatin happens because of oxygen, but you can select a sacrificial element to get corroded first. Those are called sacrificial anodes.
they extend the life of your installation and if you regularly replace the anode it can last forever
 
10:45 AM
Are all CPU/GPU pins gold plated?
 
JFC that's a terrible answer
Yes, even on cheap electronics, gold plating of contacts is normal
even when it doesn't really matter
 
People in the lounge were taking about oxidation (read conversation above), gold don't tend to rust (little oxidation).
 
11:06 AM
Only iron rusts, rust is specifically ironoxide
But what you are trying to say is true, gold is almost perfectly inert whilst also being a good electrical conductor. It's not a great thermal conductor though, afaik
I'm not sure if you could get away with gold plating your liquid cooling blocks though
Hmm... seems fairly on par with copper actually
One of the main issues with liquid cooling loops is ensuring you only use one type of metal through out
if you mix aluminium and copper, they end up reacting with each other through the water
 
 
1 hour later…
12:17 PM
the keyword for the physical process is galvanic corrosion
 
12:31 PM
I wouldn't trust a tiny layer of gold plating to save you though
Well, I guess you would have to have a scratch on two things for it to become a problem
 
12:44 PM
@thecoshman it reduces the likelihood of tin whiskers actually IIRC
 
1:07 PM
@Mysticial so what GN noticed on the 3900x was that basically it acts like a GPU as far as frequency scaling goes these days. To the point that it largely makes most overclocking pointless. Insofar as you keep it cool the chip will scale to the very limit
 
 
1 hour later…
2:21 PM
@Mgetz in what sense?
I know what tin whiskers are... I don't see how they are relevant here :S
 
@thecoshman they are exactly what they sound like to an extent. They are crystals of tin that grow from solder over time
and they can absolutely destroy a computer
 
Sure... but I'm talking about gold plating your water cooling fittings to avoid the risk of corrosion
 
Yeah that's pointless
 
Is it?
 
you're better off with nickle IIRC
Water, even distilled is a really really good abrasive tbh
 
2:24 PM
Well, maybe plating with gold is silly, but the idea of plating the metal blocks isn't stupi
 
and gold is soft enough that water will abrade any coating of it away
 
I don't know...
it's particles in water that makes it abrasive
and at high flow rate... not sure if cooling loops would be fast enough
 
@thecoshman water itself is a really good solvent because of its polar nature. It's nearly impossible to have "Pure" water because water will dissolve gasses out of the atmosphere into solution that easily
@thecoshman I've seen a lot of pictures of blocks that are stripped of nickle coatings
and nickle is really good at resisting abrasion
and that was with dH2O and a biocide
The fact that it's an in-compressible fluid also has effects too, this is why there are water jet cutters... and technically they can work without sand it just takes longer
 
Huh, I wouldn't have thought a cooling would be working at high enough velocity for this to be a problem
 
for what it's worth, failing to add an anti-corrosive was what caused the flint water crisis
@thecoshman velocity is a minor component compared to the reactive nature of water.
it will naturally abrade surfaces it's being constantly forced against though
just because it can react more
 
3:23 PM
@ratchetfreak you mean like a coating or like having an anode floating around that will get eaten first.
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix the second, make sure it is electrically connected to the structure that you want protected and in the same electrolyte that is eating away at it
 
because in the latter case, i'm not sure it would prevent galvanic corrosion.
 
it would and engineers actually use that to protect various steel pipes
 
I guess if you pass electricity it will force ions to react with the anode
 
even passivly
 
3:27 PM
I remember reading how some boat use this technique
A bit like charging a lead/acid battery will restore the anode/cathodes
 
an anode/cathode pair in an electrolyte acts as a battery cell
with galvanic corrosion the anode and cathode are shorted together
 
as far as I remember, galvanic corrosion requires an electrolyte
 
yeah
(non-pure) water can act as one
 
yes, that's why I was wondering why people aren't simply using something else than water for "cooling". I mean it's not such a big setup and water isn't exactly required
water is probably less messy in case of failure thought
 
it's the cheapest and least messy one
and it has a very his thermal mass per weight
which makes it very nice for forced flow cooling
 
3:33 PM
@ratchetfreak pure water very quickly becomes non-pure
 
btw, thread ripper is awesome, I wanted to compile rust mozjs yesterday
it took a few seconds to compile / download 90% until it quickly failed to compile mozjs
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix which threadripper?
 
2920x
pretty much the cheapest one you could find so I can't imagine how fast it can be on higher end ones
it also pretty much depends if the software can run on multiple thread/core but even in single thread it's probably twice as fast as my old i5
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix a part now outperformed in all cases not memory constrained by the 3900x
Zen2 threadripper is going to be insane
 
Any idea if Zen2 will require mobo changes or if a firmware update / same socket would allow me to upgrade?
 
3:44 PM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix no idea yet, I don't think they committed to the socket the same way they did with AM4
 
:(
I decided to go with tr4 as AM4 has been there for some time already and is probably in its end of life until some "AM5" comes around
if I'm lucky, then buying the cheapest tr will be worth it if I can upgrade to a newer one. Either way, it also means I'll be able to get the higher end TR on the cheap later
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix except AMD committed to AM4 for at least two more gens of CPUs IIRC
Honestly they are probably sticking to AM4 until DDR5 comes out
 
when you say "commited" you mean they promised to support it for X years?
 
at least through 2020 allegedly
 
but information on the tr4 socket is really sparse
 
3:57 PM
exactly, they haven't even said if they will drop threadripper updates this year
it looks like the new entry level TR part will be 64core
 
apparently up until 2020
but it doesn't say if it's the same socket thought
> AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3000 ‘3rd Gen’ HEDT CPUs – 7nm Zen2 Cores For 2019
I guess I'm in luck then
 
 
4:13 PM
ahhh
apparently tr 3rd gen got removed from roadmap
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix no it didn't marketing apparently didn't want to distract
The CEO said it flat out in an interview, that said timeline is unknown
 
ah okay s
so they're playing the mystery roadmap to get everyone in hype
it wouldn't be great for tr4 sales if they announced they'll drop the socket early
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix I'd suspect it's more of a yields issue. They need to get enough of the chiplets to even make them and satisfy 3900x/3950x demand
remember they aren't even launching 3950x until september
 
september is almost tomorrow
 
if they are intending to launch a 64 core part as intro... that would mean 4 8 core chiplets
derp....
8
that's basically four 3950x chips that they'd have to hold off shipping
so they are probably building stock of those first, while testing internally the parts and working on updates to get better performance.
 
5:10 PM
I guess, but if they're launching in september they should have a load of them being in production right now
But I guess marketing doesn't want to loose face in cases of delay
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix I'd guess TR gen 3 is December at the earliest
they want to sell 3950X first
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix I suspect it's more (or at least as much, anyway) a matter of gauging demand for 3950x vs. number waiting for new TR.
 
^
I suspect they are expecting 3950x to take some TR marketshare
particularly for things like Premiere which likes clock speed
 
 
3 hours later…
8:10 PM
is emplace(vec.begin() + i, value) linear in time?
 
yes, linear after the position
 
that's terrible, is there anything that's 0(1). I have already reserved
 
Can you just set the value?
vec[i]=value
 
I thought about that, but will the vec register a new value has been added
 
What?
 
8:13 PM
vec[i] = value won't work on a reserved vector
you lose size information
 
@Rick Adding onto the end of a vector takes (amortized) constant time. Inserting into the middle is linear on the number of existing items after the insertion point (since you have to move them to make room).
 
-1 for rep whoring
 
but I have reserved all the spots I need ahead of time
 
Its gotta move them
 
@Rick Ignore reservation for the moment, and pay attention only to the data in the vector. Are you adding to the end of the data, or are you inserting into the middle of it? If you're adding to the end, it's O(1). If you're inserting in the middle, it's O(N).
 
8:17 PM
Anyways, what to do depends a lot on the application. For example, when I have a vector of a few elements (GUI widgets), I often don't care. Sometimes a map works. A few times, for example, a text editor, a boost::rope might be the best structure.
 
@JerryCoffin I am not adding to the ends, I'm populating in a different order each time.
is there a better option then vectors for something like this
something that will let me know an element has been added and preserves order
 
too vague
 
@Rick Perhaps something like a vector<optional<T>>?
Then instead of reserving space, actually resize it to the final size, filling it with empty optional's, and when you fill in the value, it's not empty any more.
@Rick The other obvious possibility is a std::map<size_t, T>, which gives O(log N) insertions (or better with a good hint).
 
or you can deep copy the valid ones
 
@JerryCoffin this might be a good option
vector are deceiving, I keep forgetting that they are not really arrays but segmented trees masquerading as arrays.
 
8:37 PM
@Rick Umm...no. A vector is a single, contiguous chunk of memory (with a couple extra pieces to keep track of the current size, allocated size, and such).
 
@JerryCoffin I believe std::deque works too, it's supposed to have pointer stability IIRC unless you insert into the middle.
 
@Mgetz It is, but at least as I understand things, he needs to insert in the middle.
 
correct in the middle
 
@JerryCoffin good luck with that... some sort of tree maybe? either way reference locality will be shot
 
9:30 PM
One simple thing I forgot is if std::vector assignment will attempt to re-use the memory (or resize when different) of the vector that is being overwritten.
 
9:48 PM
@Mgetz Yeah, std::map is typically a red/black tree. But yeah, locality tends to be fairly poor (leading to the line: "use vector unless you're absolutely certain you need to use something else. Then you can go ahead and use vector.")
 
Use a rope (although it still isn't clear what hes trying to do). I'm pretty sure if you want to filter out incides, the best solution is a deep copy, rather than an in-place transformation.
 
10:41 PM
Lucky day, I received my case today, When I ordered it amazon was telling me I'd receive it between 18 and 22 then today it said your package is delayed and it should come on 22 and I received it today anyway
 
11:36 PM
They don't deliver on Fridays?
 
probably, but it was delivered by FedEx not Amazon
I couldn't find a case with a proper price with prime
so I got the Matrexx55 for 55 but really around 90 with tax and shipment
 
wow... That's a lot of overhead.
 
btw I would like some advice on something.
I was wondering how good of an idea it would be if making a webapp that mostly runs on the client and does requests to a db service that has a strict minimum understanding of access rights and such
but all the code would mostly run on the client side.
so if a user doesn't have access to edit a certain field, it would fail on the server but all processing could be done directly locally and push/pull changes
The ERP system I'm working on has some kind of onchange push back and forth the data to the server to do some validation that would probably run locally
 
That sounds reasonable. And probably favorable if you want to save on server compute time.
However, it does expose the implementation to the client which may or may not be desirable.
 
yeah but there are cases wher client shouldnt' have access to some data but would still need it
I wanted to reimplement some kind of erp in rust but rust doesn't allow for much plugins stuff so I'm trying to find ways to do plugins
having plugins is a real pain
 

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