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4:00 AM
@MooingDuck lol
 
I was kidding, but I didn't know that people were so against scanf
 
@ScottW Also, it's frustrating how easy some are (pizza) compared to others (bubbles)
@ScottW Also most animations are now unskippable :(
@ScottW yes. troll pizza throwing and such used to be skippable
I wished even more was, but now nothing is
@ScottW Yeah, once they finish talking, you click anywhere and the pizza teleports to it's destination and you could immediately spit out the next pizza.
 
Ell
I loved zoombinis as a young'un
 
@Ell the blue characters?
 
4:12 AM
Wow, I can't believe I still vaguely remember that game.
I just remember getting real pissed when I was down to only a few of those people.
 
hi guys
anyone here?
 
what is up?
 
4:34 AM
How do I write this? I think there is a nicer way but can't recall it right now.
while ((helper + 1)->x == left_bottom.x) helper++;
 
What is helper?
Also, you could probably just do helper[1].x
 
Assume RAI
Instead of '+ 1'->? Not what I am looking for, but thanks. I think I saw this same idiom but nicer in some gnu stuff.
 
What exactly are you looking for?
 
That's what I can't remember. I think there is a much neater way to express that whole loop.
 
I repeat my question, what is the variable declaration of helper?
 
4:37 AM
My mind may be playing trick on me, it's late.
I repeat my answer, assume it is a random access iterator.
 
Oh, that's what you meant by random access iterator.
 
Ell
@MooingDuck no Linux support :/
 
@Ell supports Android but not Linux? Wierd.
 
@mafagafogigante You can use std::find_if instead of your loop.
It looks like you are looking for the first item which has an x which does not equal left_bottom.x?
 
The last that is.
 
4:40 AM
@mafagafogigante std::find_if_not
wait, no
 
Yeah, I thought about it when you first mentioned find_if
oops, different guy
 
@mafagafogigante is at-the-end a concern?
 
It will depend on input.
More robust is better.
I will end up using an std algorithm, just need to pick the right one.
 
yeah. std::prev(std::find_if_not(
ish
gotta have a check between those to make sure you dont' iterate past the beginning
also if the element was not found
but that's the idea
 
Yeah, problem is, at least to my eyes this is not much cleaner than what I have now.
But is better.
 
4:43 AM
@mafagafogigante yeah. not much
 
4:54 AM
The more important part would be writing a comment explaining what the loop does.
 
Variable names should suffice here. Helper is a temporary one, of course.
Point left_top = *std::prev(std::find_if_not(helper, v.end(), [&left_bottom](It helper){return helper.x == left_bottom.x;}));
Readable as a brick wall.
 
I would still say it is more readable than the while loop.
 
If you are used to Python list comprehension, this is sheer bull shit.
 
What would be the "cleaner" Python "equivalent"?
IIRC, you can do filter and map with Python list comprehensions, but not find like operations.
 
I didn't mean an equivalent, just made a comparison.
 
5:00 AM
Yeah, but Python does tend to have nicer syntax than C++ for most things.
 
@Lalaland filtering gives you find
 
Yes, but at an additional memory cost?
Actually wait, with Python generators, getting the first item of a filtered list comprehension might actually be OK.
 
@Lalaland oh sorry I had generator syntax in mind, since well it’s the same
we’re looking at more or less last . head . group but C++ has nothing like group
 
std::partition is probably as close as you can get in the C++ standard library.
 
there is an itertools.groupby in Python-land
 
5:05 AM
groupby (or group) is a very nice tool to have. It would be nice to have that in the standard library as well.
 
I don’t know if all this fuses/meshes well though
 
collections.deque((x for x in data if x[0] == magic), maxlen=1).pop()
Did not benchmark, would not use. By no means much more readable than what I have in C++ right now.
 
groupby(x, blahblah key)[0][-1]
 
(x for data if x[0] == magic)[-1]
 
@Lalaland TypeError: 'generator' object is not subscriptable
 
5:07 AM
good point
 
IIRC, deque has some arithmetic size-logic stuff that would make my code OK
No idea about @LucDanton perf, never used it for that.
 
Anyways, once you start to play these shenanigans, the while loop begins to look better and better.
 
There is the law of diminishing returns though.
 
@Lalaland what’s wrong with last . head . groupBy proj!
ya know maybe head . concat . drop 1 . groupBy proj is the nicely fusing version I was looking for—oh that ends one step too far
 
select * from data where x == magic order by y desc limit 1; -- I think the syntax is correct
But for declarative, that's pretty shitty.
 
5:11 AM
anyways, head probably kills sharing in the larger picture so if drop 1 does not do it then splitAt 1
 
@LucDanton And that demonstrates exactly what I don't like about Haskell. The performance of your code varies widely based on "arbitrary" things.
 
@Lalaland FUD, doesn’t even apply here
stacking list algos is the same as stacking iterator algos or writing your loops the right way around
i.e. we want to reach the element we care about in n steps don’t we
that won’t happen by itself, you have to be careful
 
Eh, it's just that tracking down thunk leaks gets tiresome by about the sixth one.
Although to be fair, that was also mostly due to using a 5 year old version of GHC.
 
Spent so much time here about this little shenanigan that it got its own function. I am not sure about its name, though.
Point left_top = *find_last_that(helper, v.end(), [&left_bottom](It helper){return helper.x == left_bottom.x;});
 
I’ll keep in mind not to use the word 'sharing' around you so that you don’t shoot off into FUD
I was tracking algorithmic complexity
 
5:20 AM
@mafagafogigante Do you have them sorted in some way? Isn't there a risk that one of the ones with the same x is farther in the list?
Sorta like [Good, Good, Bad, Good, Bad, Bad, Bad ...]
 
I am accepting O(n lg n) for a reason.
 
You might not actually get the last "good" one.
 
Yes, sorted using (I don't remember what n lg n algorithm gcc uses).
I would guess quick sort
but may be wrong
How does GCC compare to other C++ compilers nowadays?
 
I would just note that this might be a good use case for std::partition. Depending on your exact algorithm of course.
 
if sorted then consider std::equal_range & friends
(make sure it’s sorted correctly against the projection etc.)
equal_range & projections is kinda weird though isn’t it? you have to build a 'dummy' value
 
5:25 AM
I don't think it would add anything now.
 
std::equal_range(x, end, *x) or something
 
After encapsulating the weird stuff into find_last_that I'm happy.
 
@mafagafogigante std::find_if + std::reverse_iterator?
 
Sorry?
I don't think the compiler will solve it in runtime.
Image about 10K values.
5 good on each tip.
hey bully
 
6:00 AM
hi
 
aw yis i think ive found my next wallpaper
 
6:28 AM
@ScottW heeeey
@ScottW enjoying life, breaking free of the jigsaw puzzle I worked on for a few hours tonight
@ScottW you?
@ScottW We're all good. Gonna have Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow because my sister needed to spend Thanksgiving elsewhere
@ScottW awh
had this for dinner tonight.
Along with my haircut that's pretty much everything exciting in my life right now
 
7:04 AM
@ScottW will post pic of removed hair
@ScottW nice!
@ScottW yep
 
@jaggedSpire oh no your hair, my condolences
 
@LucDanton but it's so much lower maintenance now! :D
 
@ScottW all dem SNES games
which is your fav
I never managed to play through that. I should try again at some point
oh god I love smrpg
When I was a kid I had... megaman x, super metroid, street fighter, killer instinct and smw
I might have had a couple of other ones but I don't remember
chrono trigger was a p good rpg
 
 
1 hour later…
8:37 AM
@ScottW WOOF
 
9:09 AM
lol
the kind of ads you get when you are browsing $50k land for sale
 
hi @chmod
 
What sized fonts do you guys use when programming
 
9:25 AM
The 2016 Bugatti Vision
@BartekBanachewicz ^
 
c++ errors are so shit
most of them are only slightly better then "SOMETHING'S WRONG!"
 
9:48 AM
of course it works with gcc, but not clang. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
 
9:59 AM
lol++
 
That bugatti looks so wicked
 
We offer pedegrees in dantry.
@Prismatic They mean « Have some insight about what you wrote, lol! » and offer some more.
 
This is the second clang bug I've filed
 
@Prismatic I haven't filed one yet. When I had things not compiling with clang++ but g++ was fine, it appeared that clang++ was the right one everytime :/
 
My last one was a legit bug, either way it'll be nice to find out what the issue is
If anyone wants to comment, here's a minimal repro of the issue:
 
10:19 AM
Ah, somehow I miss 2007...
 
Static integer members in a nested class require explicit definitions separate from declarations
But because they are ints I think you should be able to declare and define them inline... gcc allows it
 
Actually, they don't need the explicit definition if they are only used to define the size of an array for example.
Like, you don't need to explicitly define them as long as you only use them in constant expressions.
 
hmmm maybe clang is right? llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=13170
 
essentially you don't need to define const integer statics if you don't need their address
 
Makes sense.
 
10:29 AM
The member shall still be defined in a namespace scope if it is odr-used (3.2) in the program and the namespace scope definition shall not contain an initializer.
And of course the definition of odr-used is confusing mess I can't parse
ah well
 
I rarely read standard to find out what does a term mean. It's too incomprehensible most of the time
 
@Prismatic Not a bug.
 
« ODR-used » means « why don't we have modules yet? » in strawman syntax.
 
make_unique takes its parameters by reference, which means they must have an address.
which means they must be defined.
you can only get away without defining them if (essentially) they are not referenced, only used as values.
IOW passing to make_unique definitely qualifies as odr-used.
 
So is gcc allowing it a bug then?
 
10:39 AM
yes.
or possibly just a legit extension.
 
@Prismatic They'll probably call it a feature and tell you they can't realistically get rid of it without breaking plenty of existing code (if you try to submit a bug report that is).
 
@Morwenn sounds pretty Microsoft-y
 
@Prismatic GCC doesn't like to break compatibility when it doesn't really hurt either. Some library features are tweaked to support extreme cases of hackery and they try to maintain that.
 
10:58 AM
Hi, sluts.
 
Hi, slut.
 
I have this really weird thing.
 
I always wonder how that guy manages to pull out dance moves that look so awesome while the original moves obviously come from swing, shuffle and Tektonik.
 
When I remove a SECTION from my Catch TEST_CASE, the next section succeeds. When I leave it, the next section fails.
And I don't use a any global state.
 
11:04 AM
Is this UB?
auto ptr = static_cast<object*>(operator new(sizeof(object) + sizeof(void*) * field_count + auxiliary_data_size));
ptr->gc = this;
 
possibly.
 
@milleniumbug Yeah, UB in another unit, called from another thread :)
 
but there's a reason why Wide doesn't use Catch and it's for inter-process test isolation
 
object has private fields that are all POD, and no base classes, and no virtual functions, and no public or protected fields.
 
I feel particularly evil this morning:)
 
11:09 AM
Let's try Valgrind.
Valgrind found UB!
In my garbage collector!
==1661== Invalid read of size 8
==1661==    at 0x4EAA680: std::_Rb_tree_increment(std::_Rb_tree_node_base*) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.20)
==1661==    by 0x409D5E: std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<confx::object* const, std::unique_ptr<confx::object, confx::gc::operator_delete_de
lete> > >::operator++() (in /vagrant/_build/a.out)
==1661==    by 0x409315: confx::gc::collect() (in /vagrant/_build/a.out)
 
I'm surprised that nobody has ever done valgrindcore music.
 
inb4 this is a bug in libstdc++
 
probably not
 
Let's see.
Maybe it's indeed because I delete elements from a map while iterating it @Ven.
 
maybe you're going out of bounds or sth
@Elyse be careful
 
11:12 AM
> References and iterators to the erased elements are invalidated. Other references and iterators are not affected.
 
nice, std::map::erase returns an iterator in C++11
 
auto objects_begin = objects.begin();
auto objects_end = objects.end();
for (auto it = objects_begin; it != objects_end; ++it) {
    if (!reachable_objects.count(it->first)) {
        objects.erase(it);
    }
}
 
yet another reason I'd rather write Java than C++03
 
Valgrind blames the third line in this code.
 
possible fix: it = objects.erase(it);
 
11:15 AM
Yeah, maybe. :) Let's try that.
Oy vey.
Vagrant so slow.
 
this implicitly does ++it, so don't do that twice
 
Isn't there a standard algorithm that takes a predicate and erases elements from a map?
 
possibly in experimental
 
auto objects_begin = objects.begin();
auto objects_end = objects.end();
for (auto it = objects_begin; it != objects_end;) {
    if (!reachable_objects.count(it->first)) {
        it = objects.erase(it);
    } else {
        ++it;
    }
}
 
11:18 AM
@milleniumbug Thanks.
Now gonna test cycle collection.
In Rust, objects.erase would take it by value, so the compiler checks it won't be used afterwards. :P
Why never use safer languages: you crave the missing checks when programming in unsafer languages.
 
@Elyse why do you have auto objects_begin and objects_end
 
Because only having objects_end is ugly.
 
you're ugly
 
I'm pretty sure I'm less ugly than you.
 
I mean why not use objects.begin() and objects.end()
 
11:26 AM
Because calling objects.end repeatedly is possibly inefficient.
 
that's... a pretty terrible reason.
 
who cares. stop bikeshedding.
 
oh noes, how could I prefer simple, maintainable code over pointless obscuring non-optimization?
 
@ElimGarak hi
 
You guys ever work on one thing, but then you have to do something else to continue working on your original problem, but then when you finish that something else you forget what you were working on in the first place
 
11:31 AM
yes.
it happens all the time at work now
 
Man it is not a good feeling. Makes me feel really old
To make it worse, I noticed that I actually can barely read anything on my screen at all if my left eye is closed... ugh. IM TOO YOUNG FOR GLASSES
and memory loss
 
you're never too young for either glasses or memory loss.
 
@Prismatic my colleague refers to this as "stack unwinding", so he sometimes writes down his call-stack :) (dunno if he has implemented exception handling yet :p)
 
Also proud of my mutator function.
void fiber::resume() {
    gc->mutator([this] (auto&& safe_point) {
        ...
    }
}
 
@melak47 lol nice. I used to do this, called it my 'train of thought'. Each train compartment was like the different stuff I was working on and how I had gotten there
Too lazy to keep doing it though
 
11:38 AM
@Prismatic Haha, I wear glasses since I'm 4.
 
// 2015-11-29| IntReader.TryReadInt32("ab  12345", 4, ...) 1 000 000 times 30 ms
// 2015-11-29| int.TryParse(substring: 12345, ...)         1 000 000 times 215 ms
// 2015-11-29| int.TryParse(12345, ...)                    1 000 000 times 180 ms
@sehe I should revert this but I just continue
// 2015-11-29| DoubleReader.TryRead("  123.45", 4, ...)  1 000 000 times 110 ms
// 2015-11-29| double.TryParse(substring, ...)           1 000 000 times 176 ms
// 2015-11-29| double.TryParse("123.45", ...)            1 000 000 times 147 ms
maybe bit shifting can shave off some more :)
 
12:00 PM
Fuck signals.
 
@jaggedSpire here is some more typical C#. Fiddle does not support C#6 yet so the $"" does not work in the sample.
 
blech
disgusting
 
I hope C#7 will get record syntax, will clean up things a lot
 
@JohanLarsson select compiler Roslyn 1.0.0-rc1
 
oh, didn't know, I see that I dumbed "," should be ", "
 
12:19 PM
src/fiber.hpp:33:19: error: declaration of `confx::gc* confx::fiber::gc' [-fpermissive]
         class gc* gc;
                   ^
Thanks, GCC, for your descriptive error message.
 
why the fuck can't you do this
fuck types and values being in the same namespace
 
Does it work if you pick a different variable name?
 
Yes.
But that's fucking ugly.
Fuck C++.
 
if only you had a different naming convention for types
 
12:29 PM
garbage_collector* gc
 
^ yeah, gc is a joke as a name for a class like that
 
Why are you prefixing gc* with class again?
 
@TonyTheLion belly rubs :3
 
Xeo
@Jefery to force class namespace
 
12:44 PM
to compensate for the fact that 2 letter typenames is a terrible idea to begin with :)
and/or variables named like your types
 
@Xeo Hmm, as opposed to?
 
Xeo
@Jefery all namespaces.
 
Fun-fact: the nop instruction isn't a no-op. It advances the instruction pointer.
11
 
consider struct stat vs stat()
 
Xeo
12:48 PM
Or similar, I think
wait, that was a bad example
 
So as opposed to value namespaces?
So in the original example gc * gc could be parsed as multiplication?
 
lol, these accusations flying left and/or right. Due process not detected.
 
1:02 PM
@Jefery yep, gives a quad collector
 
1:15 PM
@Elyse pc++
 
++instruction_pointer()
 
*instruction_pointer()++
 
1:34 PM
@melak47 why would you increment an instruction
 
@JohanLarsson lol
 
This isn't Malbolge.
 
@Nooble very, by being too weak to pick up people
 
Ell
@ElimGarak I saw those accusations
 
@Ell Badlet until proven a Gudlet <3
And given that the entire thing cannot be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, he's a badlet for all times.
 
@набиячлэвэлиь Oh well
 
1:59 PM
are types singletons of type 'type'?
 
Singletons are evil.
evil_t
 
@orlp They're of type type const &
 
const type&
 
Putting a space there is evil.
 
2:05 PM
@Nooble You know what else is evil?
<insert badjoke here>
 
My mother?
 
That's the obvious answer
 
Me.
 
I eviluate to true.
Eh~, I'll be late to my rehearsal.
See you later.
 
2:10 PM
See ya.
 
@Nooble How's lumiukko goin'?
 
Didn't know she had a "Satureday" video.
 
@набиячлэвэлиь not
because unit finals
and need4study
 
@Nooble How's homework goin'?
 
2:18 PM
@набиячлэвэлиь horribly
 
> Node OS Review - Ultra-minimal Linux Distribution With Node.js/JavaScript Userspace
 
@Prismatic lol
 
You know I'm actually intrigued. I don't like bash and I never bothered learning it outside when I absolutely had to do something
I think I would like a terminal that supported something ecmascript-ish far better
I have no idea how pipes and stuff would work though
 
@orlp Not all types are singletons.
 
2:32 PM
for(auto it = week.begin(); it != week.end(); ++it)
 
Gotta use that range based for.
 
He's rolling a melee based for
 
@milleniumbug ;
 
2:56 PM
@Elyse std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::hours::max());
 

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