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12:26 AM
@Mikhail or the next AI robot?
 
machine yearning
but also fuck the FCN architecture
 
1:02 AM
On the subject of bullshit questions, anybody know what the latest max size for 3D CUDA/OGL textures would be? I think 4096^3, but I don't have a card to check.
 
1:19 AM
@Johnathan Not many anymore. Because they soon realize there's noone here
 
 
2 hours later…
3:22 AM
Didn't check the spam box of this public email address, ended up with nearly 2000 spams.
~clean up my closet, taking out the trash (spams)~
 
 
3 hours later…
6:14 AM
People who are happiest during Xmas - children and retailers.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:42 AM
@Mgetz Bumping the AVX from 3.8 to 4.0 made it fail after about 5 hours.
Putting it back to 3.8 and if it survives from now until tomorrow night, then I'm calling it on #4.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:08 AM
Key elements in horror movies: mental illness, low IQ and extreme bad lucks.
 
 
2 hours later…
12:02 PM
@Mysticial yeah I'm honestly thinking that the chip just isn't designed to drive that hard and can't supply the gates
 
 
2 hours later…
1:48 PM
@Morwenn did the C committee adopt the same language regarding signed integers as C++?
 
@Mgetz IIRC they were waiting for C++ to settle on a solution and adopt it
 
Ah ok, I was asking because it came up in an answer I wrote
and I didn't want to say they'd made a final decision yet
 
2:43 PM
People read waaaay too much into things
I'm not sure that your interpretation of implementation defined is right in this particular case. The fixed width integer (signed) types, from <cstdint> are "signed integer type with width of exactly 8, 16, 32 and 64 bits respectively with no padding bits and using 2's complement for negative values (provided only if the implementation directly supports the type) ". To my understanding, if they are supported, the cast is well defined. — Bob__ 17 mins ago
 
Can someone refer me to a lightweight and simple STL allocator that tracks the amount of memory used up by a container?
 
@VioletGiraffe in what sense? because that's not something the allocator can really track completely
 
@Mgetz Hm, I thought it's pretty straightforward. Are you saying that some internal implementation detail data of a container will not be allocated via the supplied allocator? Or is the problem something else?
 
3:00 PM
@Mgetz I wouldn't say it's "not designed" for it. They design to get as high as they possibly can. Then they bin appropriately.
It's just that for my particular 7940X, there's 2 or 3 cores that are "so good" that the vcore table entry is set too low.
Those cores are capable of hitting 5 GHz at the right voltage. But they can't do 4.0 GHz light-AVX at the default vcore + 0.030v. All the other cores can because their vcore table entries are set much higher.
In case I lost you there, "good" cores don't need as much voltage to be stable. So they tend to get undervolted and have lower vcore table entries.
But in the case of overclocking, this undervolting overcompensates - thus making the "good" cores less stable than the bad ones.
And I can't override it without a motherboard that supports per-core voltage.
By comparison, my 7900X doesn't have this problem. All but one of the cores can actually do 4.5 GHz heavy-AVX512.
And the one that can't is actually the "best" core and has the lowest vcore table entry. (i.e. the same problem, but to a lesser degree)
 
@Mysticial no you didn't the quality of the transistors in those cores probably have fewer flaws. IIRC they actually run the calc in parallel because they know some paths are dead in silicon
 
3:17 PM
what?
 
nevermind I'm probably wrong
 
3:35 PM
@VioletGiraffe the issue is things like small string optimization, so it sort of depends on what you mean by "Total memory"
 
@Mgetz: quite literally, I'd like to know how much memory a certain std::map takes up. Let's say neither key no values have internal dynamic memory of their own.
 
@VioletGiraffe so there is memory of the base container, then each container may or may not dynamically allocate
 
 
4:11 PM
@sehe how have you been?
 
 
2 hours later…
6:27 PM
@Mysticial That's a little bit of an overstatement. If they were really pushing for the highest possible clock speed, they'd still be using a Prescott-like 30+ stage pipeline. In practice, that gives high clock speed, but uses a lot more power for only minimal gains in execution speed (or possibly even a loss of execution speed, depending on how effective branch prediction is for the code being executed).
 
 
1 hour later…
7:47 PM
http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2018/p1144r0.html
@Morwenn are you aware of the status of ^ ?
 
Oops. I broke coliru.
Did rm -rf on a folder that contains mounts to root.
They were read-only mounts though.
Don't understand what happened.
Seems to work again after reboot.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:10 PM
Why do some people keep on writing Makefiles, knowing CMake exists?
 
a.) because some people don't like how CMake works b.) the project already has a Makefile that was tested and works c.) they may not like CMake, but maybe they're using yet another build engine that's not CMake nor Make
 
@Mikhail It has to be my judgement that decides whether it is unnecessary or not. My track record is 21 years without this kind of disrespectful behaviour.
 
@milleniumbug a) Why wouldn't they like it? it is IMO very clear/user-friendly unlike those cryptic Makefiles. But CMake's documentation is indeed not the best out there. b) ok, historical reasons c) anything better than CMake?
 
9:27 PM
Oh, and note that CMake and Make aren't really competing in the same territory. CMake is more of an attempt at making better Autotools, and the only tool I know that competes with Make at its niche is Ninja.
 
@milleniumbug I agree. But the point is, we live in a day and age where if you'd start a project now, I don't see any technically sound reason why one would write a Makefile instead of a clear CMakeLists.txt file knowing it can generate the ugly Makefiles
 
not many people actually know how to use cmake correctly
then it breaks and they just copy paste shit until it works again
 
9:52 PM
^ everything is like this
Most popular alternative to make is the MSVC build system? (. nb?)
 
@ratchetfreak I don't think it is too complicated, but that s maybe because I haven't been in those people's situation yet. Any examples in mind?
@Mikhail no wonder I don't know this crap, I don't use Windows&co
 
I think qt also uses some intermediate to generate their qmake files.
Also stuff like bjam, I think unreal also has a system, Microsoft has an internal build tool that converts into msvc projects
 
10:11 PM
for a large part build system is considered something you don't need to know or mess with.
Also the double edged sword of too many configuration options where people just hack away until it works on their machine
 
10:25 PM
@ratchetfreak I agree with the fact that you shouldn't mess with it. But telling a dev he shouldn't know that, is "woosh"
 
it's more that devs assume that they shouldn't need to view the thing as a complex system
 
@ratchetfreak stop assuming, start knowing
(not you, but generally speaking)
That being said
 
it's also a portion that you just don't touch a lot
 
I must admit the book entitled "The Linux programming interface" from Michael Kerrisk is an absolute goldmine!
 
so there is no incentive to learn it like you learn your main language
 
10:32 PM
@ratchetfreak not wrong
I've read +/- 50% of the book so far. Didn't expect to learn that many new things!
 

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