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3:00 PM
@jalf I have admittedly lost track of my point (wiki-walk, as ever). Okay, iterators can perform common functionality. Fair enough, but why is it obliged my class supply this? Why isn't there a uniform Template * array functionality in iterator class that does this for any array?
 
I come across a reasonable question from someone, you don't know who--remember on the Internet no one knows you're a dog--and it's downvoted a couple of times by people who've upvoted the person who, just like you guys in this conversation always go "What's your point." "What's your question."
Part of sentient interaction is that you're NOT a computer and that you read between the lines and have a communication.
 
Did you guys see these C++ Concurrency Series‌​? It presents task-based concurrency with move symantics instead of using mutexes and locks. Using move operations for thread-safety seems attractive.
 
Anyway, I try, and he seemed happy, and what you people don't see is that what you're doing is you're laying out a presentation of the experience of StackOverflow that can (and does, I know) turn people off forever
Mission accomplished?
Is that what it means to you to be great programmers?
 
Who's great? Except @DeadMG, of course.
 
Ganging up on people who clearly know less than you and asking them "what the fuck" they're talking about?
Is that who you wanted to grow up to be, guys?
 
3:03 PM
I sense a TROLL amongst us
 
@HostileFork This is the issue I have. People will knee-jerk downvote a question if there is one minor issue with it. At the risk of triggering a debate war, the other issue I find is answerers ignore the actual question and pick up on typos or trite topics.
 
I refuse to grow up!
 
@HostileFork This is why I said you had an excellent answer in the other thread. You actually answered the question proper (by denoting that it was logically valid, but it had no reference to link to). Everyone else had just said that it didn't always apply - but designs are generally subjective, one paradigm here won't apply elsewhere.
 
I'm showing you a contrast. I'm asking you on behalf of the younger programmers you were and could have been, the mentors you could have been to your younger selves, to change it because I'm getting tired of seeing this very nice resource turned into something that leaves me with a sick feeling every time I use it and read what you "high scorers" are doing.
 
it's not usually the high scorers
it's the middle scorers
 
3:04 PM
You should enjoy it.
 
damn, this cold is annoying
 
But seriously, though, I say "common interface is a good thing" and then the other person repeatedly says "so by that logic, Java is better than C++", which makes no sense at all. Of course I'm annoyed.
@TonyTheLion I know, right?
I also have another double deadline for tomorrow.
Thaaat sucks.
 
@CatPlusPlus indeed, at least I have someone to comiserate :P
oh damn, that does suck
 
@HostileFork I agree that I sometimes hate this too. For example when somebody asks whether a certain random number algorithm generates "more random" results than another somebody is bound ask: "What do mean? More random?". That's not being very helpful.
 
I have to find a job, sucks even more
 
3:06 PM
@HostileFork Has a point. SO users have made me want to avoid this place given their... pedanticness? I would spend an entire day trying to solve problems at one point rather than a quick query on SO. If people don't like newbies or answering newbie questions, they shouldn't be here.
 
some SO users just like to nipick, just ignore it
 
And enjoy teaching, and joking, and playing with the medium. It's a ripe opportunity for a better kind of humor. You can play a higher level of game. If you want to joke with me or pick on me, go right ahead, I'll match you: stackoverflow.com/questions/6124995/…
 
Hey, learning to solve your own problems is a good thing.
 
But I hate watching this other stuff going on, it's demoralizing
 
@CatPlusPlus Out of context though. You said for STL common interface is a good thing. If common interface twas the main factor, Java would be preferable (as 1 + "string" sorta things work).
 
3:07 PM
@HostileFork and you think that we can do anything about that?
 
@TonyTheLion Well, y'know, there's a definite tendency toward fatalism...be that considering whether your vote makes an impact or not, or whether we can change the culture of the Internet or not.
 
@CatPlusPlus Not really. Because it often requires specialist knowledge on a specific subject whose terminology is often unknown to me. For example, function template specialisations I would have never figured out by myself, neither name nor by reason. It still took SO to answer it.
 
@SSight3 Eh, okay, I might have overreacted, if you feel bad, then I'm sorry. But: 1 + "string" is a different issue altogether, and no, Java type system does not allow you to do that.
 
I came to SO after Wikipedia, and...well, that was my first big community involvement project, and it was both really exciting to think "wow here's this new thing" and then these terrible lows where you're like "oh my God, we're fighting over WHAT?"
 
3:08 PM
@HostileFork not really into fatalism, sounds too fatal :P
 
But why common interface is a good thing: generic programming.
 
You can make template <typename Iterator> void foo(Iterator a, Iterator b) { ... } that does something on a iterator range a..b.
 
@CatPlusPlus With common interface you mean for example Java's "Collection" interface?
 
Now, you might want to do this on an array. Or a list. It doesn't matter, because you're programming against a concept.
Not a concrete implementation of it, like pointers.
 
3:10 PM
@CatPlusPlus Sorry to be fighting with you over technicalities. Perhaps we can return to analysing alf's x(x) example?
 
@TonyTheLion But yeah, I do believe that if there was a bit of a consensus on pushing toward "raising the question" and the discourse around it instead of slamming it down...we'd all be happier.
 
Maybe I can challenge you guys with an outside-the-box question?
 
(In my defence, I'm cranky lately.)
 
(You might not like it, but it's why it's outside the box)
@CatPlusPlus We all get those times. It's a programmer thing I think.
@HostileFork Kudos for chilling the place.
 
@SSight3 Well, it shouldn't do that, in any case.
 
3:12 PM
@CatPlusPlus I do hope it's evident by the fact that I'm bothering to be upset that I really do respect the knowledge of the C++ constituency of SO (from whom I've already learned a bunch) that just makes me pained by the thought of "the other side of the screen" for the kids and noobs who want to someday know all that too
 
But then again, it's Java.
We don't like Java here.
7
 
It just seems that one can have the good with no bad, and have better
 
@CatPlusPlus Java does those things. But it's less efficient. I was told it was a pointerless language. But when I had to use it... I got a NULL pointer error ARGHHHH.
 
@CatPlusPlus hear hear!
 
@CatPlusPlus We don't do that kind of thing around here.
 
3:13 PM
Well, it doesn't have pointers called pointers, but most Java names are references.
Primitive types aren't, AFAIR, but that just adds to the sillyness.
 
@CatPlusPlus The Java language specification calls them pointers. However, many Java programmers are not sufficiently competent to master the terminology established by their language specification.
 
@SSight3 You see, the are NULL pointers!
 
I love criticising Java...
 
Haha. The only positive thing I will say, aside from it's universalness, is the graphics commands. I wish this existed in C++.
 
Java is so verbose that it's not usable without an IDE that does heaps of code generation for you.
 
3:15 PM
You mean the Java2D stuff? We've got OpenGL and DirectX and SDL and tons of stuff like that.
 
Not to mention the stupid naming convention...
 
@StackedCrooked The calling everything private/public etc thing was a nightmare...
 
SDL and SFML are better than Java2d
 
@CatPlusPlus Yeah. But I find OpenGL/DirectX etc all require you implement obscure .DLLs and call these obtuse matrix functions that makes me want to wonder why I haven't got a degree in mathematics.
 
Well, it's graphics for ya.
 
3:16 PM
@SSight3 SFML can be statically linked
 
It's made of matrices, basically.
 
@IntermediateHacker Agreed. It'd be nice is somehting like SFML was standard. I can't get the static link thing to work.
 
But the glPushMatrix/glPopMatrix stuff is long deprecated.
 
@CatPlusPlus I know, but I could never get my head around the columns to rows thing. Argh.
 
the news says they disassembled ghadaffi
 
3:17 PM
I always used Gdiplus for 2D graphics. Lately I've been using Qt more.
 
@AlfPSteinbach Did they find the bug?
 
delete Gadaffi;
 
@AlfPSteinbach for repair? later reassembly?
 
i think irrepairably
 
@Praetorian I'll second that
 
3:18 PM
@AlfPSteinbach I guess it was not for transportation purposes.
 
@StackedCrooked Perhaps. Just disassembled sounds like they are trying to debug him.
 
But. NewLeader* l = (NewLeader) Gadaffi;
 
I think he was pretty much considered the bug.
 
It's a little chilling though. Quite gruesome.
 
@IntermediateHacker while(NewLeader != Dictatorship); //This causes an infinite loop bug what the heck?
 
3:19 PM
But I don't really follow politics, so dunno.
 
it seems everything is a matter of interpretation. NRK says libyans in Norway are crying -- because they're so happy. They show pictures of crying libyans, that's how happy they are.
 
@SSight3 You need to increment.
 
@StackedCrooked It runs out of resources if I do that.
Anywaaaay
 
@AlfPSteinbach I guess news channels are the same everywhere. They showed that here in Oman too.
 
Sounds like they murdered him
 
3:22 PM
@SSight3 You need to use a circular_buffer.
 
and in the UAE
 
An NTC fighter told the BBC he found Col Gaddafi hiding in a hole in Sirte, and the former leader begged him not to shoot.
 
How many countries have revolutionized now? i've lost count
there was Egypt , Jordan maybe? then Libya
 
Belgium in 1830.
 
@StackedCrooked It gets a heap corruption error: too many dictatorships.
 
3:23 PM
russia...twice
lol
 
Anyway, anyway, must stop... myself going off-topic.
 
What advantages could you give a dynamic array over std::vector, for example?
 
then there was the anti-corruption protest in India and like 5-6 revolutions in Pakistan. Oh and small unrests in Sri Lanka
 
@IntermediateHacker They say the iPhone revolutionized the mobile phone industry.
 
3:25 PM
@StackedCrooked thanks for delete politics;
Yeah. When will iPhone 4s be released?
 
I prefer to *NULL and start a new process.
End of this month I believe.
We should be careful with this topic though, there's a strong anti-Apple sentiment in this room.
 
Damn, I hate it when u buy the latest technology and it gets out-dated before u can brag about it.
 
Aaargh, whoever invented XOFF and XON should be flogged with bananas.
 
flogged with bananas ?
 
@IntermediateHacker There's always that nagging doubt that perhaps I should wait another year before buying.
 
3:28 PM
@StackedCrooked Yeah.
 
@CatPlusPlus That's why i prefer RS232+OpenFile 8)
 
Hey guys what's the "current" way to iterate through a "map"? It seems examples online are outdated or something
 
If current means "C++11", it's for_each(begin(your_map), end(your_map) [](const decltype(your_map)::value_type &value) { your_code; });
 
in that format how would i say print out the current element? @user392858
 
for_each(begin(your_map), end(your_map), [](const decltype(your_map)::value_type &value) { cout << "Key: " << value.first << " - Value: " << value.second << endl; });
 
3:35 PM
Okay thanks xD
 
Please. Works for other container types too.
(Oh, I forgot a ',' after 'end(your_map)')
 
It seems not to be the proper version it claims foreach don't exist
<,<
what import would it be?
 
#include <algorithm>
Also, it's in the std:: namespace. And make sure it's 'for_each' not 'foreach'.
 
seems llike using namespace std doesn't help, it ddoesn't like the begin()
etc
 
What compiler are you using? It might not support the 'most current' C++11.
 
3:41 PM
std::begin, std::end or your_map.begin(), your_map.end().
 
[](const decltype(variables)::std::string &value
it does not like using string
@user392858
 
decltype(variables)::value_type, not decltype(variables)::std::string
 
No, it's literally const decltype(your_map)::value_type. Don't replace value_type with your type. It's a typedef.
 
Did i do it wrong?
 
is there really no question on "how do I use a member function as a callback with C"? as a better dupe for stackoverflow.com/questions/7838504/…
 
3:52 PM
Anyone knows if blocks and code blocks are the same thing in Python?
 
What do you mean by "block"?
 
4:08 PM
starting from the top
 
Okay, question: What is the quickest way to start coding, practical, useful C++ software and code that other people can use? What is the fastest way to learn?
 
Just do it.
 
@SSight3 - have a real goal for someone (might be yourself) and then go for it
 
Find something you need, and try to implement it.
 
needs to be realistic
 
4:14 PM
@SSight3 depends on your starting point. Are we talking about someone who's new to programming, new to C++, or experienced at everything relevant?
 
@CatPlusPlus I find I run into many a brick wall if I just do it. I tried to plot data from text data from the NASA website but... eventually it tripped over itself despite my best to encapulate.
@jalf On the lower end of moderate, shall we say? Trying to undersell myself, but I am not going to say I have knowledge, far from it...
 
Design is not a goal, make it work, and then make it good.
@ManofOneWay Yes, they're the same.
 
@CatPlusPlus I don't understand the statement. It tripped up right near the end.
 
@SSight3 - I'd probably try and avoid something like plotting because it implies graphics
 
That's always the issue. Trips up the near the end. Right near the end. It's like someone places a booby trap at the finish line.
 
4:16 PM
which can be a big topic in itself
 
@awoodland I used SFML to implement the graphics side, which keeps it very simplistic.
 
Well, you said "encapsulate". Nevermind. Try something simpler, and then come back to this later.
 
I've never heard of SFML before - my way of plotting stuff is probably best described as "esoteric" or "quirky" (OpenGL + gl2ps library)
 
@CatPlusPlus Is encapulation the correct term for putting different function purposes (like graphics, file loading, etc) into separate classes? What would you say is simpler but would teach me something?
 
(gl2ps certainly beats writing a postscript generator yourself :) )
 
4:20 PM
@awoodland Well, in short, it provides an array of pixels. Long story short, a function that takes in a range from the solar data and plots it within the pixel range that it 'best' slots into. If you get me?
Perhaps I should be asking is 'how do I avoid tripping up so painstakingly close to the finish line in every project?', what am I doing wrong?
 
Hey do you know why:
char * name = new char[command.size()-1];
allocates a lot of extra space which then gets carried with it when I attempt to read the variable? It features tons of weird characters
 
I doubt it does allocate any extra space
it just happens that you can read the space next to it although that's undefined behaviour most likely
 
How do i fix this?
 
@oorosco What happens if command.size() is = 0? name = new char[0-1].
 
@oorosco - simply don't read past the end of what you asked for
or use std::string to manage strings for you
 
4:23 PM
Wow. How a single letter change the entire syntax structure of a sentence.
 
command size can never be less than 1
 
@SSight3 Encapsulation means data hiding. Maybe it does have other meanings, I don't really pay attention to the OO theory.
 
at that point in the code
 
Putting things in classes is just designing classes, if you ask me.
 
can std::string be used for fstream? @awoodland
 
4:24 PM
for reading from fstream? or for constructing one?
 
Yes. Don't use char arrays, unless you have a very specific purpose for them.
 
@CatPlusPlus Okay. Well, I'm trying to sound clever saying I just organised stuff into classes and made them communicate with each other. It kept very stable right up until the end - and bear in mind I did my own char array classes etc etc. The end seemed to be a loading issue.
 
to construct one.
 
I never did work out why fstream only took C style strings for its constructor, but you can do ifstream(filename.c_str()) still
 
Well, first rule, don't reinvent the wheel. If it's already implemented in Boost or standard library, it's not worth redoing.
 
4:25 PM
template<typename T>
class DD2 : public Base<T> {
public:
void f() { Base<T>::basefield = 0; } // name f is dependent on T , right?
};
 
Especially that most of this stuff is prone to silly errors.
 
@CatPlusPlus Reinventing is what helps me learn mistakes so fast.
 
@MrAnubis I think I'd have said Base<T>::basefield is a dependent name
 
@MrAnubis f is not dependent on anything
 
and what happens if we write
template<> class DD2<int>: public Base<int>{
public:
    int f;
};
 
4:27 PM
@CatPlusPlus That's true. But using my own char arrays taught me to include self-documenting error messages.
 
I never found writing strings to be particularly interesting activity. :P
 
@MrAnubis then you have a specialization.
 
@MrAnubis - that's fine as far as I can see, but damn confusing for the next person that looks at it
you also need to be careful where you write it
 
so now f is dependent on T , right?
 
no
 
4:28 PM
@MrAnubis no
 
why?
 
you should look up what a dependent name
is
 
there's a really good gotw on it
hang on
 
@CatPlusPlus It's a chore, but with every new version of the same class, it's always better than the previous. I've learnt that const does not prevent pointers being deleted, that you should check for self-assignment in copying/assignment/move operators, etc. I just wish I could just... finish a project for once. Without the bugs.
 
a dependent name is a name that depends on the template parameter
 
4:29 PM
@TonyTheLion my god , not again , dependent names are so confusing :(
 
f in your case is just an int, and its type is known and it doesn't depend on a type parameter of your template
 
question 3, although the answer isn't hugely helpful there
 
if you did template<typename T> class A { public: T f; }; here f is a dependent name because it's type depends on the type of the your templates type parameter
 
So how do I avoid tripping up at the end of any of my projects? What am I doing wrong to cause it to screw up, right at the end?
 
@SSight3 Okay, now revisit your string and implement copy-and-swap idiom instead of checking for self-assignment. ;)
 
4:31 PM
Thanks you both @TonyTheLion and @awoodland :)
 
@SSight3 are you compiling with maximum warnings and aiming at 0 warningins in the build output
 
To finish projects it's best to reuse as much code as possible.
 
try some unit testing or similar too
 
Then you minimise the surface for possible bugs.
And write less code, which means you get results quicker.
 
(and get some GDB ninja skillz)
 
4:32 PM
Yeah, learn how to do unit testing.
 
although that takes practice
 
@awoodland No warnings or errors. Just the program did originally run, it'd load and sort out text files etc (even download them for me), but then when trying to display or render the images, it'd crash. And I could never figure why.
 
Visual debuggers will probably be better for start.
 
hardest thing about GDB is learning all the commands
lol
 
@SSight3 are you on linux?
 
4:33 PM
@awoodland Nope. Windows.
 
@TonyTheLion - I have the opposite problem with visual debuggers usually I know the commands but I can't second guess the damn icons
 
For basic debugging you only need to know how to move around the running code, and print values.
 
@CatPlusPlus Debugging tools is something I'd love to get familiar with as it'd help with diagnostics of broken code. I can never read the messages though.
 
download Visual C++ Express by Microsoft
it's free
 
4:35 PM
Debugging 101: set a breakpoint, see what's in variables.
 
and it gives you something to toy with
 
JIT debuggers can kick in if your program segfaults, so you can examine the variables in the crash site.
 
@CatPlusPlus Writing less code would be optimal but it assumes I have any idea what I'm doing with it.
 
Well, or run your program with the debugger attached.
Segfaults and alike are treated as implicit breakpoints.
 
I always find debuggers a little... difficult to grasp/read, so I often avoid them.
 
4:37 PM
@SSight3 You don't need to know every single tiniest implementation detail. You need to know how the code works overall, and how different parts interact with each other.
 
that works up to a point, but nothing beats a backtrace and printing some local variables to spot overruns and NULL pointers
or stepping through from a breakpoint to figure out how the hell it ended up executing that line
 
@SSight3 debuggers are a key tool for a programmer, I don't know how you can code without them
 
@CatPlusPlus Lets just say I have a tendency towards grandoise designs and ADD, and they don't match too well.
 
Also, NULL pointers are one of the reasons pointers should generally be avoided, unless the NULL happens to makes sense (but then there's boost::optional).
 
@SSight - you've not read the GOF book per chance?
 
4:39 PM
@TonyTheLion I make sure my code has built-in fail-safes to catch errors on the first sign of trouble, and generally do manually coded in catches/traces when there is a problem. To point: I write code as logically bug-free as possible.
 
WTF "gang of four" is a punk band now. That's quite a career change!
 
@awoodland Never heard of it.
 
Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software is a software engineering book describing recurring solutions to common problems in software design. The book's authors are Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson and John Vlissides with a foreword by Grady Booch. The authors are often referred to as the Gang of Four, or GoF. The book is divided into two parts, with the first two chapters exploring the capabilities and pitfalls of object-oriented programming, and the remaining chapters describing 23 classic software design patterns. The book includes examples in C++ and Sm...
 
@awoodland If you'd write a book with singletons in it, you'd want to change careers, too.
2
I have a feeling tenses are all wrong in this sentence, but meh.
 
4:41 PM
@CatPlusPlus no need to get all tense about it
sorry that was bad
 
@awoodland I'll be frank. I purchased various C++ books, and... I gloss over when reading them. They'll talk about all these fantastically advanced concepts but then I can't read the code due to the complexity. Doh.
@awoodland Don't worry... it's all in the past now.
 
Why would it give me an error when i attempt to pass strings a parameters? Sometimes it just randomly throws them. Not the const & wasn't there originally but i've been tyring to get it work :( ideone.com/LnfIG
 
@SSight3: Don't worry, most C++ books suck tremendously
@oorosco You need to post an example that completely compiles except the problem
can't possibly help you with such a tiny, irrelevant snippet
 
@oorosco that's a fragment of code. you need to add #include <string>, and place the code in a function body, and so on.
 
and declare parser before using it
also unless this is C++11 >> is going to be a problem
 
4:44 PM
@oorosco Believe me, don't be paranoid about people stealing your code snippets. People can't help without the code, and no-one would want to take it anyway. Consider how C++ code in general can be commericialised without recriminations anyway.
 
I'ts not that
i can post the tnire thing but it's long
I try to trim seemingly irrelevant portions
 
make a small example
you'll either a) figure out the problem
or b) post something that we can help you with
 
I prefer the length examples so I can trace my way through.
 
both outcomes are good
 
I can't compile with this problem :(
here one sec
 
4:46 PM
@SSight3 most books suffer from unreadable code. it is a common problem: the author thinks his or her task is to communicate ideas to the compiler. but the code should better be about communicating to the reader.
 
That's one of my classes. the problem functions are the "parser" and the "instruction_parser"
 
@awoodland why is that ` swap( t1, t2 ); // 6 ? ` it's dependent
` std::swap( t1, t2 ); // 7 ? ` and it's nondependent , why? (from your gotw article)
 
@MrAnubis - I think it's Koenig lookup doing that
 
Specifically in instruction_parser the condition (if command.at(0) == '@')
 
@awoodland i think both are dependent , must be error in website
 
4:48 PM
@MrAnubis - I'm pretty sure that's correct
you always call std::swap, regardless of what T is when you write std::swap
 
I'm getting http://ideone.com/xRo24 error
@DeadMG
 
but when you write just swap you might call a different swap depending on what T is, what namespace it lives in and what else lives in that namespace
 
@awoodland but which swap instance has to be chosen is dependent on template parameter isn't it?
 
It comes down to, if i switch my std::string to a char * a = new char[size] it will compile, however for somereason i get additional values
but with std::string it won't compile <,<
 
@oorosco Without seeing your code, how the hell am I supposed to help you?
you need to find a small example, that compiles otherwise, and then post it
 
4:50 PM
@oorosco Humour me here to test a theory. Replace the instances of '@' with 64 for me
See if it compiles
 
Okay how about this, is there any way i can figure out where the error is being thorwn/
 
@MrAnubis I don't think it matters which std::swap gets called at the first phase of the two phase lookup though
 
@oorosco Test the theory and see what happens. It will give insights either way.
 
@MrAnubis ADL kicks in only for unqualified names.
 
@SSight3 Nope, the @ is fine, it's a condition that was fine before i changed from char * array to Strd::string array
i just tried to compile, same thing
i changed it to 6 though because 64 is not one char
 
4:52 PM
No no no
64 is a number
 
@awoodland darn :( , having problem with everything in C+++++++++++
 
64 is a number for @. But it removes the '@'. Don't use ' ' on it, treat it as if it's an int.
 
Oh its ascii equive
 
Yes
 
You know the "stray @" messages are due to Ideone trying to compile the error message as C++ code?
 
4:53 PM
Oooh?
 
@CatPlusPlus what does adl has to do with instantiation of template ?
 
same problem @SSight3
 
I wouldn't compile with ideone anyway, use a desktop compiler.
 
@MrAnubis That swap snippet is ADL.
 
@MrAnubis having a problem with subtleties of two phase lookup and Koenig lookup puts you in the top quarter of C++ programmers
 
4:54 PM
@oorosco Okay, so it isn't the '@' that is causing it. Give me a moment...
 
Lamia! C++ templates!
 
@SSight3 I don't know if this helps, but i can make it compile if i make the paramater for "parse" from std::string to char * array. However the problem is that it adds extra chars, like really weird ones for some reason.
 
@oorosco - sounds like it's not being terminated right
or reading unintalised memory somehow
 
Which one, the char * array? @awoodland
 
@oorosco Which line is "parse" on in this code so I can take a look ideone.com/8jPGM ?
 
4:57 PM
ctrl + f " std::vector<std::vector<char>> parser( "
that will give you the called function, the calling function is " instruction_parser("
 
@oorosco I also see several places in your code with types like this std::vector<std::vector<char>>. This won't compile correctly unless you're using a C++11 compliant compiler. You need to add a space between the >> std::vector<std::vector<char> >
 
You have a prototype
It says
 
?
what's taht?
 
versus
std::vector<std::vector<char>> parser(char* file
std::vector<std::vector<char>> parser(const std::string &file
You have a char * file, and a const::string &file
 
That was me adding stuff
tyring to make it work, i tried a few combinations.
Originally it was : strd::string name
std*
 
4:59 PM
No no no, you see
 

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