« first day (369 days earlier)      last day (3330 days later) » 

1:00 PM
int* counts as any pointer. I don't follow.
 
Ok, maybe I'm being dense.
 
Hello, I am new to C++ and I have succesfully set up the compiler and have also tested it.
some tutorials>
 
The constructors of the standard smart pointers taking std::nullptr_t are in fact constexpr.
 
1:03 PM
How useful can that be?
What can I do with a constexpr shared_ptr?
 
constexpr int im_helping(std::unique_ptr<int>&) { return 42; } ?
> error: the type 'const std::unique_ptr<int>' of constexpr variable 'p' is not literal
Too tired to check if reference types are literal.
 
const& no?
 
I fixed that.
 
I still don't see the point though.
A smart pointer is a runtime construct. I fail to see how it could be useful at compile-time.
 
std::tuple_cat is constexpr!
 
1:08 PM
But that's useful at compile time.
You can have tuples of ints and such.
 
And now you can std::tuple_cat tuples of pointers!
Problem solved.
 
But why smart pointers?
The only smart pointer that is valid at compile time is an empty one.
 
OZ_
If I will learn C++, will I become smarter?
 
Until you overflow the accumulator.
 
What are you talking about?
 
1:13 PM
How do you guys use the "map", do you use the operators [] or insert?
 
[] requires a default constructor, so you cannot use it sometimes.
 
sbi
@oorosco That depends on what we need to do.
 
Hum. Okay.
 
cpx
@oorosco [ ] if you're trying to replace an existing value, otherwise insert is used.
 
@cpx Why is that?
Has anyone seen this before? What does it even mean lol: ideone.com/KIWGB
@RMartinhoFernandes @sbi @cpx
 
1:32 PM
@oorosco: Do you have the code for the line the error occurs on? Those usually occur when you haven't properly escaped a character. For example \ should be '\\'.
 
what other things can cause it? And no, it doesn't jump to anything.
Although I am narrowing it down very slowly
 
@oorosco: Also, thank you for a prime example of the incredibly verbose error messages of the STL containers. I was just reading about it a little while earlier.
 
That's what i've narrowed it down to
Not sure what it is though.
 
@oorosco: What else? No idea without seeing the code, to be honest. Skim through, look for any @ and \ in your code (ctrl+F will supply this functionality). I'll take a look.
 
@SSight3 I commented out a function call to that method and it works, that specific one, what is inside of it that tweaks? no idea <,<
 
1:38 PM
@oorosco: I tested your function. No apparent errors. Looks fine. I'd tack in the suggestion to make the second argument take a default parameter (which would default to std::string's internal size).
 
I always get bullshit errors
:(
 
@oorosco: You have a couple of issues. Make int unsigned so a user cannot supply negative numbers, and also, if the string contains no data, and the user supplies a number higher than 0, it will cause the application to crash. Two ways to solve it: check string isn't empty (empty() function) and make sure int is equal to or less than string size.
 
This is an internal substring thing, no one but myself uses it. The siize 0 thing is a good idea though since that is possible from the calling method.
 
@oorosco: It's okay if it's only you, but believe me, it will save yourself a lot of hassle in future to have fail-safes/catches for issues. I have it so if anything breaks intended behaviour, the code yells at me. For example, a function might accidentally pass an empty string (which is supposed to be a valid one containing data), and having the catch will intercept a bug earlier on.
@oorosco: You could also optimise the function by resizing the vector to match std::string's size, so you don't have to keep pushing and potentially reallocating. But that's just me.
 
Okay. :) So it seems that the error was with me using the class to parse the string.. same method inside the calling member's class works
weird.
 
1:49 PM
user image
4
nailed it
 
@jalf Hey, what's up?
 
hi
nothing much
trying to make sense of some javascript/IE problems
I DID NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS!
 
haha
Why do you have to do that? =(
 
because someone has to do it. We've got a bug on it. An activex component that's being screwy
 
1:54 PM
@jalf: Isn't javascript the language that generally silent fails?
 
Cat eating and C++ this morning I see. Hello @SSight3 ...
 
@SSight3 from time to time, yes
 
@HostileFork: Hello HostileFork. Sorry, just preparing food.
 
No problem. (Or NP as the non-computer-scientists abbreviate it.)
Hm. Can one subscribe to badges?
Like "I'd like to see if anyone gets a stellar question 100+ upvotes"
 
@jalf That's pretty much the definition of an ActiveX component.
 
2:14 PM
@HostileFork: Back. I'm curious about user-interface because I want to be able to write classes that have a user-friendly, intuitive interface (more intuitive than the STL containers where possible - IE doesn't require weeks to figure out). But that's just me.
My other question is how on earth stackoverflow can even run despite not apparently having a business model of sorts?
 
@SSight3 "intuitive" depends on who's reading the code. A non-programmer won't find any class interface intuitive. But a serious C++ programmer will find STL containers much more intuitive than your home-brewed variants
 
@SSight3 SO has a business model, they have a better career site positioning than monster.com or dice or whoever...there's some advertising, there's tag sponsorship
 
@SSight3 mainly by having investors who believe that if the site(s) grow big enough, it'll be easy to make profitable
 
Also, I think there is a certain amount of "going for broke" of pro-future people who are throwing their hats into the ring with the idea of a new economy based on whuffie or whatever. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whuffie
 
@jalf: Whilst fairly true, new users do have almost universal expectations. Like being able to append char arrays to each other. One recent SO question was why a char array would append to a string literal. I know this makes coders divide, but this is just merely an example. Somethings you just... instinctively do.
 
2:20 PM
@SSight3 No, people who don't know what an array is have an expectation of being able to appen arrays onto each others
And people who don't know what an array is should not be using arrays.
 
@HostileFork @jalf Makes sense. It's the same kind of suspicion that strikes me about wolfram alpha, which also has self-referencing ads and an odd seeming business model.
@jalf: Whilst ignorance on it's limitations is a reasonable point, why is it so many new programmers make that exact same move/mistake?
 
The interesting thing about the STL's interfaces is that they are designed to guide the programmer. Operations that you shouldn't be doing aren't part of the interface
 
Well money is a construct anyway, the real question is can you influence people to get your needs met.
 
you can't use the += operator on bidirectional iterators because you shouldn't. Because it's an expensive operation. You can't use [] on a list for the same reason
 
@HostileFork: herd behaviour and the smart cow problem would suggest you can.
 
2:22 PM
"The Matrix" -- as it were -- which leads people to believe in the green pieces of paper or whatever that are freely printed, are supposed to be based on the good faith of the government issuing that. It's not because green paper has intrinsic value.
 
People who have no clue what they're doing might expect to have those operations available, and so a good library is one that tells them "No! What you're trying to do is a terrible idea"
 
So basically, StackOverflow is just another institution of some amount of good faith, and the belief that can be traded for accomplishing what one wants.
 
@jalf: I am not saying all classes have functions. In-fact, an iterator with += behaviour with another iterator I'd argue is risky and even counter intuitive. += with a number would seem valid but I'd still be cautious.
 
@SSight3 I meant with a number, of course
like it += 4
It is doable, but would be more expensive than it looks, so it's something you shouldn't do, and so the STL doesn't expose that operation
 
@jalf That would make sense to me. As would -= 4.
 
2:24 PM
That is an intuitive interface. Something which prevents you from doing bad things
@SSight3 It's a linear-time operation on lists. If you want to do that kind of operation, you should use a different data structure
That's why std::list and its iterators don't support it
 
@HostileFork Is the 15:22 thing a reference? But it's good enough, but with profiteering in the world, and no such thing as a free lunch would lead me to believe there has to be a cost somewhere.
@jalf I had a complaint a dynamic array class I had didn't support iterators. But I always felt they should only be supported by list-like classes (and integrated to it at that). Arrays 'iterators' are, of course, pointers, so to speak.
 
@SSight3 what do you mean? Why shoudln't iterators be supported on arrays?
 
int main()
{
    int x( x );
}
^ The silly MSVC 10.0 compiler chokes on this, spitting out error message. Is it right?
 
@jalf Because pointer operations already supply that functionality. If you can access the array pointer, and it's size, then you have access to the end of it etc. If iterators are really needed, they should be implemented seperately.
 
@SSight3 Well as the saying goes, "just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you". I generally gripe about crowdsourced systems that make their user community do the work and then monetize it. But it's a spectrum, and the more value a system provides and the more it embraces free content licenses you go "okay, this is not so bad"
 
2:28 PM
@SSight3 It is a pretty fundamental aspect of iterators that pointers are a valid kind of iterator
 
@AlfPSteinbach: No. Self-referencing recursive loop.
 
And I think most people would say that for an interface to be intuitive, it should, as much as possible, behave like other similar interfaces. So saying "list can have iterators, but array shouldn't" is about the most unintutiive thing you can do
 
@jalf They are. So why do I need to supply iterators for an array given pointers already exist?
 
@SSight3 because that way I can reuse my knowledge of how containers work and how iterators work
And "supply iterators" can be as simple as a typedef T* iterator
 
More precisely, it says "error C2065: 'x' : undeclared identifier", while I am pretty sure that I'm seeing a declaration of x
 
2:30 PM
You write one line of code in the class, and your users get to apply their knowledge of how iterators work
 
@HostileFork: Well, crowdsourcing can have it's advantages in that knowledge gets passed along quicker. But the problem is, herd behaviour directs the first person to answer generally influences the rest - if someone dislikes my question, for example, a flame-war would likely break out and the question nay get answered.
 
@SSight3: There generally seems to be an order of magnitude more credibility behind Joel and Jeff than like, GoDaddy or the DNS system, so I think it's about choosing your alliances. (I know some people who worked for Steven Wolfram and do not consider him or his intentions trustworthy / virtuous, but that is hearsay, so I wouldn't put much stock in it without evidence.)
 
oh, plus begin and end functions, I guess, but the sensibel thing to do would have been to make those non-members to begin with
 
It does accept this:
int main()
{
    int x = x;
}
 
@jalf begin is basically GetArray() and end is GetArray()+GetSize(). Why do I need to supply begin and end?
@jalf The user is likely familiar with pointer syntax already.
 
2:32 PM
Iterators are a common abstracted interface.
 
@SSight3 because other containers have begin and end functions, and I'd raher have to remember the two functions begin and end, which I can use on all containers, than have to remember the special rule that "oh, but for dynamic arrays, you have to use GetArray() and GetSize() instead
 
@CatPlusPlus Appeal to common practices. So is pop music. But I ain't got pop music in my code.
 
then begin and end can return plain pointers, of course, and everyone's happy
 
They also allow for more information to be carried, than pointers. Most standard library implementations have debug iterators.
 
but if you want to talk about intuitive interfaces, and still give dynamic arrays an interface like that, please step away from the keyboard right away and don't write another line of code
 
2:34 PM
Pointers should be the last resort, not a first choice.
 
@jalf If you're using iterators, then you probably already know how to use the +GetSize() thing already. Why get the iterator if you have no idea what to do with it?
 
Common interface is a good thing.
You're less likely to make silly mistakes.
 
@CatPlusPlus So by this logic we should dump C++ in favour of the most popular language in usage... like Java?
 
cpx
@AlfPSteinbach Hm, I think it is because the x is not fully declared at the point where your trying to initialize it.
 
Er, what?
 
2:35 PM
@SSight3 What are you talking about? You're assuming that I'm using iterators, and therefore I don't know what to do with an iterator, and also know howto use GetSize?
That makes absolutely no sense
 
@CatPlusPlus You said a common interface is a good thing. Java is more common across operating systems.
 
@SSight3 Is Java an interface, now?
 
What.
 
Please, start making sense
right now
 
@jalf Okay, run with me. If I give you an iterator, what operations will you perform on it?
 
2:36 PM
@cpx However, both g++ and Comeau accept the code.
 
@jalf Java has an interface, does it not?
 
Pointers are a specific and primitive implementation of a simple iterator.
What the hell are you on about, really?
Java is a language.
 
@CatPlusPlus I'm trying to figure out if it's ignorance or trolling.
 
@CatPlusPlus So is C++.
 
Stop trying to invent new nomenclature, eh?
 
2:37 PM
@SSight3 depends on what problem I am trying to solve
 
@CatPlusPlus You said a common interface is a good one. Java has a more common interface, so by that logic, is it better than C++?
 
but I would perform the operations that the iterator interface allows me to perform
 
@jalf Such as...?
 
What the fuck are you talking about.
 
Here's a meta-question, and I've hit up against this with peeps in this chat room before.
 
2:38 PM
@SSight3 So you, the person saying the STL is no good because it is not "intuitive" enough, are arguing that there is no point in having a common interface for multiple classes?
Please think carefully before you answer that one, if you don't want to go on the ignore list
 
@jalf You didn't answer my question.
 
wait wut?
 
@SSight3 No, you didn't answer mine. What problem am I trying to solve with teh iterator you gave me?
 
High-scorin' folks who know the ins and outs of the C++ spec far better than I: Do you stand a better chance at improving the world because a really important programmer with a really important problem logs into SO and asks it, and you solve it, world gets better...
 
I can't really tell you which operations I'd perform with it if I don't know what my objective is
 
2:40 PM
Or are you an order of magnitude more likely to impact the world by helping someone new to programming, perhaps as new as you once were, before you knew much of anything?
I'm going to wager the latter.
 
Newbies are annoying, though.
 
So are you
 
@HostileFork come again?
 
@HostileFork Answer SO questions, cause then others can look at the answers too :)
 
@jalf You had said it lets you perform the operations you wanted to perform, right?
 
2:41 PM
@HostileFork he's just honest
 
What's wrong with helping newbies and answering questions on SO?
 
The interesting thing about newbies, though
 
cpx
@AlfPSteinbach another interesting case is int x[x] is not acceptable on both g++ and MSVS.
 
Is that they're a bit harder to characterize than an expert.
 
@jalf So you have operations already in mind. You don't need a case example to supply an example of an operation you might use.
 
2:41 PM
It's like watching an adult with bad behavior vs a child
The adult is worse
 
@SSight3 an iterator allows me to perform the operations necessary if I want to iterate
 
Because the adult knows better
 
@jalf And what operations are those? This is circular.
 
I think that some of what I know is perhaps outdated. For example, as a student I found that my program to compute PI to umpteen digits, got much more CPU time if I stuck a match down beside the Return key so that it appeared that the process was interacting with a user. This was under MPE/IV on a HP3000 mini, and it was very effective: the other users got 0 processor time, he he.
 
@jalf You can't seem to justify it's usage to me with an operation you would use with it.
 
2:42 PM
@HostileFork sorry, I think I've missed part of your argument. What are you getting at?
 
That's what gets me so twisted watching these questions and these chats, is because I look at some of this and I go "I know this person who is answering the question is not 12. I can tell you, for a fact."
"But they have no idea who they're talking to and they're taking it out in a sick posturing thing that they should be bigger than."
I was at the Austin C++ meetup earlier this week
 
@SSight3 huh? Do you want me to list the operations that iterators can be used for?
 
I don't seem to follow any conversation here today.
 
I mentioned StackOverflow
 
@HostileFork: If a really intelligent person asks a really good question, out of experience, anyone unable to get it, cannot answer it, and therefore the question would slide into oblivion.
 
2:43 PM
@CatPlusPlus neither m3
 
@jalf A few. As an example.
 
@CatPlusPlus let's have a conversation of our own :P
 
@SSight3 what purpose will that serve? I assumed you know what an iterator is already
 
And professional programmers...we're talking mature adults, who worked for Bioware or whatever and know what they're doing...were dismissing StackOverflow as the sort of environment they did not enjoy.
So they won't hang out here.
 
@AlfPSteinbach Compiler isn't coded to support it. Implying there are variations in the standard implementations of even the most basic functions, which might also imply STL isn't as standard as hoped.
 
2:44 PM
I find that depressing, because I do think it's one of the better sites in terms of its technical underpinnings.
 
@jalf To demonstrate it's purpose, if any.
 
fine, given two iterators, first and last, I can do something like std::find(first, last, 42), or std::transform(first, last, foo), or std::sort(first, first + 10)`
 
@jalf As opposed to pointers.
 
But you guys are being abusive, not conversational. I don't care how much you know. And you're not listening to me because you do this every... damn... day.
 
@SSight3 What do you mean "opposed"? A pointer is an iterator
 
2:45 PM
@HostileFork what question you ask?
 
An iterator is just a generalization of a pointer
 
@TonyTheLion I'm still trying to figure out those "pointers are better than iterators" and "it's better to not have common interface on containers" bits.
 
I watch it and I want it to change, because I'd like people I actually respect as programmers to think it was worthwhile to log into this and use it, 'cause it's cool
 
@HostileFork what are you trying to say????
 
@jalf Then why do I need to supply iterator operations? You have demonstrated the user knows how to use pointers and ergo iterator operations would not simplify for those not knowing about pointer issues.
 
2:45 PM
@CatPlusPlus without definition of "better" can't be answered. with definition, trivial.
 
@HostileFork a lot of professional programmers just don't have the time/energy to put effort into helping newbies here
 
@CatPlusPlus oh don't try to figure that out, I think it was uttered by a person whom most likely doesn't really understand these things
 
"What the fuck are you talking about." is not how adults interact with people trying to have programming conversations.
 
@HostileFork Are you talking about how SO users can be hostile to posters etc?
 
Oh please.
 
2:46 PM
wow, is this a newb invasion???
 
@SSight3 because then I can call `std::find´ the same way whether I have a linked list or an array. Is that not more intuitive and more convenient than having to remember a different syntax for each container type?
 
@TonyTheLion An incredulous question. You were never a newbie on SO before?
 
Of course I'm going to be annoyed when a person says "by your logic, <insert some nonsense here>" to me.
 
@SSight3 I was a newbie once
but I did a lot of research and reading myself
 
No, this is a room run by the only trolls who can stand to stay around here, driving any decent people or decent discourse away.
 
2:47 PM
@TonyTheLion Then do not be surprised. We all learn.
 
@hostilefork what question did you ask (or did you?)
 
Lowest common denominator.
 
in the below code , name f() in DD2 is dependent , right?:
 
My question is: Is there any hope that we can have some rules of engagement? I don't like seeing new people be abused.
 
If I can do std::find(mylist.begin(), mylist.end(), 42) and also std::find(myarray.begin(), myarray.end(), 42), that is a lot more intuitive and simple than if the array version looks like std::find(myarray.GetArray(), myarray.GetArray() + myArray.GetSize(), 42)
 
2:48 PM
@jalf It makes sense, but this implies iterator works uniquely under the covers.
 
@HostileFork dude, stop talking this crap or GET THE HELL OUT!!!
 
Yes, some will never get it, but until they go on the attack what's the point.
What crap?
 
@CatPlusPlus by my logic, a lot of nonsense is true :)
 
Bah, I've been on the Internet too long to care.
 
@HostileFork Has a valid point. Dismissive comments are abounds.
 
2:48 PM
Look, I guess I care more about the noobs than I care about washed up old egomaniacs trying to put people down before those people get a chance to learn programming.
 
@HostileFork someone's feeling grumpy today? ;)
 
template<typename T>
class DD2 : public Base<T> {
  public:
    void f() { Base<T>::basefield = 0; } //name f() is dependent on T , right?
};
 
If someone gets offended by a phrase like that, then lol.
 
I mean, HostileFork has a valid point.
 
Because I was a kid once, and it really does make a difference.
 
2:49 PM
@HostileFork most people were ;)
 
@MrAnubis no
 
@SSight3 what do you mean by "works uniquely"?
 
Yes, but some people remember it.
 
@jalf If this is the case, perhaps iterators as being seperate from the array class (but accepting the array class etc as inputs) would be best.
 
@SSight3 please click on the right message when replying. It's really hard to follow the discussion when you just click the arrow next to my last message, while writing a reply for something I said 5 messages ago
 
cpx
2:50 PM
@AlfPSteinbach Disable language exetension /Za try it again. ;)
 
@jalf Well, imagine a linked list is A <-> B <-> C where-as an array is contiguous. In order for the iterator to move consistently, it has to work uniquely under the covers (as A isn't consistent spacing).
 
I refuse to be called an adult, that'd imply I'm all serious or something. Being serious is what kills people.
 
@jalf I haven't clicked anything. I just write the @ things.
 
@CatPlusPlus oh I so agree with you there
 
And I remember how harsh words on FidoNet or whatever hurt a lot. Sure, it was nothing to jaded old guys having a beer and using the channel more as their personal venting angle. The people who click down down down vote on an ESL 13 year old here instead of just going "hm, do you mean this?" It's easier to edit a question than to downvote it.
 
2:51 PM
@SSight3 ah ok. Well, if you use the bent arrow things that display when you mouseover a message, then it'll be a reply to that specific message
 
And I'm glad I'm not like you guys. Seriously. I'm glad I have the good sense to be angry at you.
 
@AlfPSteinbach but if you write f() outside class , you will write something like : template<typename T> void DD2::foo(){} , and also you will instantiate DD2 like DD2<int> etc
 
@HostileFork I'm glad I have the good sense not to be angry
and I'm still not sure what you're so pissed about. Do you feel we're being meanieheads towards @SSight3 or is there something else going on I've missed?
 
@jalf It was hard for me to keep track of three discussions at once so I was using the @. I'll try to use this where possible.
 
@MrAnubis i'm not sure i understand your question. just disregard my answer, ok?
 
2:52 PM
it's alive! my internets it's alive!
 
@HostileFork what the hell have we ever done to you? You come in here and rant that we're assholes and all sorts of crap, but you haven't said what it is we did to YOU to make you angry?
 
@SSight3 if you use this, then others can see by moving the mouse over your message what it was a reply to. makes things a lot easier for everyone :)
 
@DeadMG oh nice one :)
welcome to the house of rants :)
 
@jalf It is likely he notices the hostility posters of SO show to newbies? It seems I cannot post a 'correct' question to anything - even if I am quoting other SO users who gave me such inperinent advice in another SO question.
 
@AlfPSteinbach i think f() is dependent name but i am not sure , can you give me reasoning?
 
2:53 PM
@SSight3 but which posters, and where specifically? I might agree with him, but it's kind of hard when he's not just saying what he's so angry about
 
@jalf I will try to respond in that fashion.
 
Being annoyed due to repeated nonsense is not the same as being hostile.
 
are we talking about answers on SO proper?
 
@AlfPSteinbach you mad on me ? why?
 
I have no problems with newbies that listen.
 
2:55 PM
the problem is
 
@jalf For example, I inquired about #include and whether inclusion at the end of the file or anywhere was valid (I.E. acceptable to coders), but it got attacked by a poster (I don't name names) for being duplicate, which spanned into a 20+ comment flame war between both coders defending and opposing, then the question got closed.
 
@MrAnubis no, not at all. there's just so much noise here right now. i cannot concentrate. it's like IRC but without the underlying threads that tend to weave through IRC messages.
 
there are lots of C++ answerers who don't have a clue what they're talking about
 
@SSight3 I still don't really see the relevance. Yes, the implementation of a list iterator will be different from the implementation of an array iterator, but that's the entire point. It makes the API more intuitive, because you have one concept (an iterator) which looks the same to users, and does the same "logical" operation, regardless of the underlying container. A list iterator behaves like an iteratr, and an array iterator behaves like an iterator, at a conceptual level
 
@AlfPSteinbach ohh grins
 
2:56 PM
@jalf I assume so. Chat I have no experience with, but it could be expansion of it.
 
Read today in "Thinking in C++" that "temporaries are always const".
 
even though in the actual implementation, the array iterator will just increment a pointer when you increment it (or simpler still, it'll be a pointer), where a list iterator will look up the next node in the list, and point to that
 
That's wrong.
 
@StackedCrooked Rvalue refs wouldn't make sense if they were.
 
temporaries are not always const at all, and it's trivial to write a program to disprove it
 
2:56 PM
@StackedCrooked Bruce doesn't maintain errata list (or I don't know that he's ever done that)
 
@SSight3 ah, I see. That's definitely stupid, and a lot of SO posters are jerks towards newbies
 
std::string().clear()
 
And even in 03 I think standard explicitly says that member functions can modify rvalues.
 
I was more going for the std::string().swap() angle
 
did i write "bruce"?
 
2:57 PM
as it has real value
@CatPlusPlus It does.
 
Perhaps it easier to teach noobs that temporaries are always const instead of "RValues can only be bound to const references in C++03".
 
mmmm
3.0MB/s download speeds
 
sure
but saying that temporaries are always const is wrong
 
Indeed.
 
2:58 PM
but I might say, I don't really see how someone coming here to vaguely rant and attack and insult everyone, like @HostileFork is apparently doing, is an improvement
 
and stuff like swaptimization and move semantics are really important for performance and correctness
 
Well, I sometimes oversimplify, too.
 
"Accelerated C++" is much more accurate in that regard.
 
That seems just as stupid as people who attack newbies in SO questions
anyway, gotta run
 
Of course then the nitpicker brigade attacks.
 
2:59 PM
Wait up
They say it's better to light a candle than curse the darkness
 
With a flamethrower!
 

« first day (369 days earlier)      last day (3330 days later) »