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5:17 AM
Folks, is there a good chat room to ask a question about Visual Studio Code?
My question is about setting up JSON schema validation. I've read the doc, but I'm missing a step for reducing it to practice.
 
 
2 hours later…
7:28 AM
This is I
 
8:25 AM
If I create a docker container of asp .net core api. Is it going to run docker-windows & docker-linux both? Or they have different procedure to build it. Thanks.
 
@bluetoothfx You specify a base image for your docker image, which determines which env the docker expects to run in. If you use MS base images for .NET Core, your images will be Linux-based, so they'll run in a Linux environment.
Your Windows machine runs Linux-env docker containers without isues.
 
9:08 AM
Morning
 
@Hozuki so if I target to build a container for linux environment then I will be able to run it linux/Windows without any issue. Thanks for your tips.
 
@bluetoothfx Yep, Windows Docker now runs on WSL2 (Windows Subsystem for Linux)
@CaptainObvious Morning!
 
 
8 hours later…
4:57 PM
Well it's been fun, see yall tomorrow
 
 
3 hours later…
8:06 PM
hey
I figured out part of my issue, I needed to set the serialization name of the object I was serializing like the assembly name so that it would actually create the dll file.
APPARENTLY deserializing a method info object is co-dependent on the dll file or some assembly reference existing AS a file on the hard drive, EVEN THOUGH I compiled the assembly and it's sitting in RAM, apparently the deserialization method doesn't have a reference to the assembly via RAM... what??? In memory dynamically compiled assembly SHOULD be used by deserialization I'm so confused!!! @_@
I'm so mad about this.
There HAS to be a way to get it to use the in-memory assembly that's already loaded as a deserialization reference. WTF Ugh omg. >.<
I need to figure out how to get C# to reference an in-memory compiled assembly without having to depend on the dll file.
 
 
3 hours later…
11:36 PM
posted on October 22, 2020 by Scott Hanselman

ASP.NET Core can understand what "environment" it's running under. For me, that's "development," "test," "staging," "production," but for you it can be whatever makes you happy. By default, ASP.NET understand Development, Staging, and Production. You can the change how your app behaves by asking "IsDevelopment" to do certain things. For example: if (env.IsDevelopment()) { app.UseDeveloperE

 

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