« first day (4968 days earlier)      last day (30 days later) » 

12:16 AM
@me9hanics classes, especially inheritance, generally enforce a strict hierarchy, and when that is combined with multiple inheritance it can get messy when the underlying thing that is being represented doesn't have the same strict hierarchy. Moreover, multiple inheritance being used as a hammer to "mix-in" functionality means all subclasses of that resulting class is forced to "opt-in" to whatever got mixed in.
Other languages that don't have classes can still provide similar levels association of common set of functions via something like traits, and these can be mixed and matched as needed, resulting in no hierarchy as that's a completely flat structure, fulfilling the Flat is better than nested. in Zen of Python.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:25 AM
@MisterMiyagi I had to look this up. My mum didn't make it up, apparently people do pass this myth around. It seems that they're just hellbent on breaking your legs.
I have a nice image of it going back to its den and thinking to itself that it had a good day at work and then bragging about it to friends (badgers have friends, I think?). And all along it was just a stick that snapped.
I so wanted a pun on "deepfake" here but I couldn't manage it :'(
 
 
5 hours later…
6:05 AM
@me9hanics I can relate on some level (at least for the part where you want to make a packages/professional code but unsure how to do it). My two cents is this: don't stress over it. Look up "Python Design Pattern" and you'll see good example of what most people do in popular Python libraries. You obviously don't need to do the exact same, but the goal here is to get inspiration so you can make something you feel confident about
the llm.c code you're referring to isn't really made to be professional either, as the author stated themselves in the README, this is supposed to be educational and ground for faster/better performance than the Python version. Interpretability over full performance, so probably not a good example. And Pylance is another beast in itself.
@me9hanics I don't ever use **kwargs either, unless I'm making commandline options. Don't always use classes either (only recently started using them more seriously) so I can relate. Referring to what Andras said too, it should only be used unless you're doing inheritance or need states, and IMO when you're truly obliged to (e.g.: design guidelines in your company you need to follow, or the library depends on Classes like PyQT, etc)
@metatoaster and additionally, too many classes slow down your code too.
 
4. If you worry about speed, use fortran instead
 
6:24 AM
yeah, I guess this is shorter :P
 
Heck, functions in Python are too darn slow, I learned that the hard way with the JavaScript unparser that I built. I was thinking I could get away by destructuring the series of function objects (per node type) into a single series of bytecode and encapsulate that in a function, but I never got around to figure that out because by the time I was interested in doing that I became very disenfranchised with Python on the whole, so...
Erm, disenchanted, was what I actually meant to type.
 
6:45 AM
@metatoaster you mean that for calmjs?
I was actually looking for a decent JavaScript parser in Python, but didn't try any yet
 
@me9hanics To weigh in here with the n'th opinion, in my experience the main goal to follow should be YAGNI. Don't see whether something should be a class? Don't add one. Don't see whether something should be an extra module? Don't add one. And so on. Python is pretty flexible, you can still expand a heap of functions later on to classes, modules, interfaces, yada yada, once the need arises.
There generally isn't much use in adhering to design patterns just out of principle, and that goes doubly so for Python where added cruft has actual, heavy runtime cost.
 
@NordineLotfi calmjs.parse specifically, that's its own package - I wrote calmjs as a framework to 1) bridge Node.js dependency with Python packages 2) bridge the build toolchains between these two systems
calmjs.parse is forked from slimit because the maintainer effectively abandoned the package and I need a number of incorrect parsing/unparsing fixes that I just ended up doing it myself
as for parsing JavaScript in Python, it depends if you need ES6 and onwards - if so don't look at calmjs.parse, but if it's specifically for legacy stuff i.e. ES5 please feel free to try it, I still use it to pick up static definitions in JavaScript files
 
@metatoaster that's pretty good :D
 
@metatoaster I don't think python is used for this any more? It's literally for compiled extensions
 
@metatoaster got you
 
6:56 AM
I mean, I don't want to use Python anymore, but I still use it from time to time for quick one-off things
(nor JavaScript for that matter)
 
@metatoaster For my usecases, it's for helping me to deobfuscate some JavaScript code (I know how to deobfuscate partially JavaScript by doing manual work, and it's too big to use on any deobfuscator). I thought of some parser that I could use to help in my own analysis/manual work. I'm not sure if this is using ES5 or 6 though, is there a good way to tell?
 
Interestingly, I saw a couple of posts about how bad polars is in rust. It's actually more sane to go through a python layer for the API than use the rust api
 
I mean, Polars was written for Python, so that part makes some sense
@NordineLotfi Run it through the parser and find out, if it complains about let or const being unexpected then it probably can only handle ES5
 
got you, thanks
I also thought of a good way to help in reverse engineering code, but I don't really know the correct term for describing it. Basically, I sort the code in such a way that everything is defined from top to bottom, so nothing defined at the bottom of the file will be called at the top, etc. Is there a good term for this?
 
well, JavaScript does allow arbitrary variable definitions, so if you reorder all the definitions to the top it can change the program
 
7:02 AM
yeah I know, this isn't to run the code as is, but to understand it better, so I can pick and choose any N stuff from the top and be able to run it and interpret it out of context
I just don't know if there is a better term for this or if there is one existing
 
yeah it doesn't ring a bell
 
@NordineLotfi the closest I can think of is "from first principles" but I don't know whether it fits here
 
anyway, just throw the code into the parser and see what happens, if it returns an AST you are probably good to go, if not find another parser that does work
 
@roganjosh hmm, I'll take it :D Thanks
 
which was what I did, until I found that the parser I was using had very subtle bugs that turned out to be the probable cause of weird user-facing errors I was getting in a thing I was writing in Plone back in the days, because they literally used slimit for the JavaScript minifier
 
7:04 AM
@NordineLotfi Sounds like a topological sort.
 
@metatoaster Will do, Thanks!
@MisterMiyagi ohhh, this might be it, yeah. Thank you!
I tried so many google queries but didn't find any fitting term
 
I still think "from first principles" is the best you'll get. Buy that means building something back up from the start, like using thermodynamic fundamentals to build something else. It's not common parlance
For God's sake, scrolling doesn't work for multiline messages on mobile. But* not "buy"
 
yeah, honestly the more terms the merrier. It helps finding related topics on search engine...
 
It's very much a technical term. Most people won't understand it
 
@roganjosh Harping fun wine autocorrect, I sea.
@roganjosh That's a rather low bar. :P
 
7:15 AM
@MisterMiyagi I wish I could do batter
 
For all the awesomeness that GenAI has brought, it really now bugs me even more how bad autocorrect, autocomplete and friends are.
Pro: I can write messages via my watch while jogging through the woods. Con: There's a good chance Siri thinks I want to pledge my firstborn to the dark lord.
 
You didn't pledge your firstborn? That's actually grounds to kick you
 
Obviously, I pledge my lineage to rooms/6!
 
 
3 hours later…
10:15 AM
say, does anyone know the minimum amount of epoch to train on the load_digits dataset on sklearn? This is for a CNN model
Nevermind, most epoch I'm seeing on github is around 50-100 for this uh
It seems like I found a way to train a CNN model on this dataset in only one epoch and get 91% accuracy :D
 
 
4 hours later…
2:33 PM
Howdy everyone...

Question : Can we run 2to3 tool on non .py files? such as .asp files with embedded python code?
 
2:56 PM
Necromancy :O
 
3:34 PM
@ABcDexter no idea but I doubt it
 
3:47 PM
I bet two quatloos that one cannot.
 
Speaking of weird use cases, is there any way to recover the original sys.exit after sys.exit = lambda *args, **kwargs: ...? I've got nothing.
 
If there isn't an sys.__exit__ (similar to sys.__unraisablehook__) I guess not.
 
@AndrasDeak--СлаваУкраїні Something like raise SystemExit()?
 
But as far as I can tell, sys.exit(arg) is functionally equivalent to raise SystemExit(arg).
 
3:57 PM
fair duplicate points
 
Neat, thanks. Will go with that then.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:38 PM
@AndrasDeak--СлаваУкраїні you can use importlib.reload(sys)
unless you don't want to import importlib, then Miyagi's suggestion is better
 
5:53 PM
Wow, that line of code simultaneously looks 100% correct and hacky at the same time
 
I see, welp
@Aran-Fey I know right?
I knew importlib but never knew that it had reload
 
That really doesn't work? Huh
 
at least on 3.8
although I did notice that the try-except block does not actually catch SystemExit for some reasons
wait
 
@NordineLotfi Probably easier to test with sys.exit = print. Doesn't work for me in 3.11.8 with your code.
 
6:04 PM
nevermind it doesn't work, you were both right
@Peilonrayz yeah, doesn't actually work after I used print(sys.exit). What a blunder
 
I first thought the script exiting meant it worked but found it weird that SystemExit wasn't caught
 
6:16 PM
couldn't find the python bugtracker for this one, so I guess that's that
 
6:35 PM
I assume it's because sys is built in
 
you're right, this is probably why :o
 
Also sys.modules puts it in a very special place
 
 
2 hours later…
8:26 PM
Hello! Can someone give mea hand with my question? stackoverflow.com/questions/78498152/… Im still not able to solve it :( Thanks for your time!!
 
9:20 PM
@user24900119 I'm quite confused about that question - there's a lot going on
 
@roganjosh Hi! Im iterating over a polars dataframe to make a for loop of queries into a database. However, some of the queries are taking more than i would like to accept. So i want to create a threshold of n seconds to finish the connection an keep with the next values of the loop.
 
Largely I think it's a "me" thing but I really don't like SQL being wrapped by a df library. Have you tried to see whether the timeout is obeyed simply with the SQLA engine on its own?
 
But saving into the dataframe some message, like fill the column with "Time Out"
@roganjosh I added a timeout into "connect_args={'timeout': 2}", the results ar ebetter, but i cant be sure wich values was not taken into consideration
 
But what I\m suggesting is removing pl.read_database and using the engine directly. Firstly, can we confirm that the connection timeout works? I think you're suggesting that it does?
In which case, your problem is with else: pass surely? You're not attempting to add any default values on a timeout
The other thing I'm confused about is why a timeout has any significance at all
It shouldn't be the case that some values are harder to find than others, so you give up after 2 seconds. What is the significance of the timeout criteria?
 
9:36 PM
@roganjosh Thanks for your answers! First, im not sure how to just use the engine directly for this case. Second, im using the pass to just keeping the loops (in case the result its not empty) Im not complety sure if the timeout its working. The criteria is give up after 2 seconds because the result are easy to get on the datase, if i get a time out i would find for just those values after
 
No worries, I'm just trying to get my head around what you are actually trying to do here. What do you think it means practically if you get a timeout?
 
I think the connection is closed
 
The timeout you're applying is probably on a connection attempt, not a query runtime for a start
In which case, getting a timeout would have no bearing on the data you're looking for anyway. It would be based on your internet connection to the database, so is entirely independent of the data you're looking for (you could run it a thousand times and get different answers every time. It tells you nothing about the data itself)
@user24900119 Also, this isn't true. SQLAlchemy will set up multiple connections. When you use engine.connect() you're really just snagging a connection from an existing pool and when it gets "closed" it just goes back into the pool. This is actually a very good thing compared to other SQL engines. I just feel like you're operating under a number of misapprehensions here
 

« first day (4968 days earlier)      last day (30 days later) »