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10:33 AM
b: [1 2] compose [ [a b] (map-each c b [x * x]) ] => [ [a b] [1 4] ]
b: [1 2] compose [ [a b] (map-each x b [x * x]) ] => [ [a b] [1 4] ]
But I'd need => [ [a b] 1 4 ] instead ... any way?
 
@giuliolunati I think MAP-EACH should splice by default, which would give you the option of putting a block in a block...splicing is strictly more powerful.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:55 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE I'd agree
You mean, compose should splice by default?
 
12:10 PM
@giuliolunati This is what you need: b: [1 2] compose [ [a b] ((map-each x b [x * x])) ]. It produces [ [a b] 1 4 ]. Double-parentheses splice in COMPOSE, currently, which I prefer.
 
 
2 hours later…
1:57 PM
@MarkI thank you! Exactly what I searched for.
 
 
2 hours later…
4:02 PM
When I describe the idea of GET-BLOCK! being used in branching to subvert voidification, e.g. give back what you put in, I make an odd remark about WORD!-fetches of NULL giving back a VOID!. Then GET-WORD! fetches would give the actual NULL. That makes voidification seem more natural (you expect nulls to present as void unless you do something "get-y") and not a "weird" by-product of branching.
That breaks unused-refinements-as-null, which would force them back to BLANK! without an <opt> annotation or somesuch. So probably bad. But if that hadn't happened, I wonder if it would seem like an okay idea. Just a weird thing to think about.
 
4:30 PM
posted on July 03, 2020 by @hostilefork Brian Dickens

@hostilefork wrote: (Replace this first paragraph with a brief description of your new category. This guidance will appear in the category selection area, so try to keep it below 200 characters.) Use the following paragraphs for a longer description, or to establish category guidelines or rules: Why should people use this category? What is it for?

 
4:48 PM
posted on July 03, 2020 by @hostilefork Brian Dickens

@hostilefork wrote: (Replace this first paragraph with a brief description of your new category. This guidance will appear in the category selection area, so try to keep it below 200 characters.) Use the following paragraphs for a longer description, or to establish category guidelines or rules: Why should people use this category? What is it for?

 
 
3 hours later…
7:33 PM
Yes they are more a category now.
 
7:44 PM
For those who want to but cannot sleep and for those who can sleep but do not want to: a nice talk by uncle Bob youtube.com/watch?v=7EmboKQH8lM
 
 
4 hours later…
11:46 PM
Speaking of "strictly more powerful"... the issue of splicing has to settle in my head at some point. I know Rebol/Red coding is very frustrating for users who don't have a firm grasp on whether an operation is going to append one item or many... when you are dealing with an abstract "value" that may be a block or group or path... or not.
Beyond the frustration for new users, there are countless instances of bugs that emerge due to the lack of awareness at a source level of what append thing1 thing2 is going to do.
I had expressed that I felt it was unwieldy to have to type things like append/splice block [a b c] or collect [keep/splice compose [(stuff) and (more stuff)]]... that there was something about the natural mechanics of building blocks out of runs of other blocks which lined up with building strings out of runs of other strings, that the /SPLICE added too much "weight". Also, there is no non-spliced form for strings.
I wondered if I'd ever re-evaluated how "bad" this is after modal parameters, when you could say append block @[a b c] to mean splice, or collect [keep @(compose [(stuff) and (more stuff)]]. I've proposed that modal parameters might even allow collect [keep @ compose [(stuff) and (more stuff)]]
You'd still be able to append a literal @-block with append block '@[a b c], because modal parameters work that way. The evaluator burns off one level of quote and the modality is not triggered.
 

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