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12:26 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE <optional> would be the exact same length and more explicit for most ...
 
Perhaps. I was just noticing in writing things like my ELSE that the <opt> felt like jargon, a bit of a wart.
But maybe you could choose to use the abbreviation if you liked. Kind of like how I am in favor of this direction where FUNC and FUNCTION are synonyms.
 
 
2 hours later…
2:43 AM
Agreed.
 
 
5 hours later…
7:52 AM
@GrahamChiu forum.rebol.info that is.
@giuliolunati Thanks for the update on r3n/renc repo.
 
 
11 hours later…
6:49 PM
posted on January 21, 2020 by gchiu

USAGE: ‌ -- :value :extra ‌ ‌DESCRIPTION: ‌ Show the name of a value or expressions with the value (See Also: --) ‌ -- is an ACTION!

 
I feel like multiple return values is a fairly important feature; and the inkling I have is that it is the most important use of the [x y]: whatever syntax. One thing that bugged me though is the same thing that bugged me about multi-SET...what happens to the overall return result when you get a NULL back that you can't put in a block.
e.g. if you get a situation where that wants to return it so that X gets set to 10 and Y gets set to NULL, it seems bad to have that evaluate to [10 _] or somesuch.
It could be that the overall expression does not try to evaluate to the aggregate, but only evaluates to the first value. So even though you can assign multiple results, the overall is just the first result. So in that case, it would assign x 10 and y null, but then simply evaluate to 10.
And when I think about it, that's actually probably more useful.
That is contentious with my sort of idle thought that [x]: whatever would be a notation for saying "assign x but assure it's not null". But x: non null whatever shortened as x: the whatever or x: must whatever is probably fine for that, as it would be a shame to ruin a broad feature like multiple return results for something so narrow.
new-pos: evaluate block
[new-pos]: evaluate block  ; same result as without the block
[new-pos value]: evaluate block  ; same result as without the block, but sets value
The trick is that multi-return functions need to be designated so, as there is no particular value that can be returned in the full bandwidth of value-space which couldn't be the value itself. Also, for reasons of performance, these special functions probably want to know how many values are being assigned so they can avoid unnecessary calculations. Not only that, they might want to leave a variable as-is in certain cases.
I mention it as I've been particularly non-thrilled with the new-pos: evaluate block vs. new-pos: evaluate @value block skippable parameter syntax. It's nice that it's possible and was interesting to try as opposed to new-pos: evaluate/set block 'value. But it is contentious with what I see as the broader usages of @ and it's not a convention I want to see catching on.
I'm kind of feeling a bit set on [new-pos value]: evaluate block and it's beginning to seem I will settle for nothing less. :-)
 
 
4 hours later…
11:23 PM
@iArnold you're welcome! Also sync'ed on metaeducation.
 

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