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10:13 AM
Anybody have a git / github workflow setup on Linux. Would like to share best practices? (I am always at war with git it seems ;-) )
 
 
3 hours later…
1:20 PM
posted on January 20, 2020 by Oldes

Current state: >> form 0% == "000%" >> mold 0% == "000%" Expected result is "0%" in both cases. This issue was not in the initial release. It is there probably since this commit: rebol/rebol@f4ce48e

 
1:49 PM
@iArnold On Linux I just use the command line. GUI-wise...I haven't done a lot of research on what good version control tools there are so I still use SourceTree on a host Win/Mac system and then run the Linux development in a VirtualBox which shares the folder.
Probably the right thing to do is to be using some VSCode-based Git Plugin. I just haven't taken the time to pick the right workflow in there. GitKraken has some okay-seeming features, but it's quite a heavyweight piece of bloaty Electron stuff.
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE I did something similar on my macbook when syncing the repos for freered and altred. I kept the terminal windows open so I only had to arrow up and enter a few times.
 
Workflow-wise: each task make a separate branch and name it. Commit as you go. Squash them down if intermediate commits aren't meaningful.
 
Yep, commandline combined with gitk I think it will be.
 
Learn to use git rebase -i (interactive) It's really not that hard to learn.
You can then combine commits (fixup or squash), omit them, rearrange them, etc.
 
I have some tuts and cheatsheets printed.
 
1:54 PM
Git rebase really just brings up a text file where each line represents a commit. If you move the lines around you reorder the commits. Not all reorderings will go seamlessly so you have to edit any conflicts.
If you delete one of the lines, the rebase just won't have that commit in it.
If you change the label on the line of the commit for what to do with it, it will take that action. The text file has comments in it telling you what your options are.
Another good feature to know is git reflog. Basically, all your screw-ups can be restored to a previously known state unless you purge them. I wish I'd known about that earlier than I did.
 
 
5 hours later…
6:42 PM
Is -- a synonym for dump ?
 
 
3 hours later…
10:08 PM
@GrahamChiu Sort of, though it prints "--" before what it outputs.
The design for -- emerged around the time of the creation of invisibles, and I was trying a lot of novel ideas of the time. I wanted you to be able to say things like --dx: dumper or somesuch and then say --dx foo and get output like --dx foo: 10 where it would pick up the name automatically so you could know what dumper it was.
 
Not quite a synonym
>> 	b: 2
== 2
‌
‌>> 	a: dump b 3
b: 2
‌== 3
‌
‌>> 	a: -- b 3
-- b: 2
‌** Error: Item not TEXT!, INTEGER!, WORD!, PATH!, GROUP!: 3
‌** Where: -- main
‌** Near: [... -- b 3 ~~]
‌** Line: 1
‌
‌>>
so dump acts like ??
from R2
The forum.rebol.com has been active now for 2.5 years!
2
 
@GrahamChiu Let's make sure it stays backed up :-) Lot of info there.
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE there's an automatic backup to s3:// daily and backup rotation at 5
 
@GrahamChiu Yes, that's correct.. -- and its kindred are variadic and read to end of line (or end of group/block or to |).
It would be cool if people felt like hacking on -- to make it better. The one thing is that technically I believe I decided there is no such thing as a "conditional invisible function". So you can't have it return a result sometimes and sometimes not; that is a fundamentally flawed idea in the evaluator's model.
 
USAGE:
‌    -- :value :extra
‌
‌DESCRIPTION:
‌    Show the name of a value or expressions with the value (See Also: --)
‌    -- is an ACTION!
‌
 
10:20 PM
I've made some notes about why but I'll have to look them up.
 
is help circular referencing?
 
You can file that as an issue if you like. That string is not produced by help, it is the string that was used as the description when the function was created in the first place.
Since -- was created by an expression something like --: dumper on or something like that, then it's the fault of DUMPER when it asked for the function to be made.
I don't recall the exact syntax but you can do things like -- #off and it will disable the output of all -- dumpers. So you could make your own other ones, like --net: dumper #on etc.
Then --net #off would not disable plain -- dumps.
The fact you can do things like -- x: 1 + 2 and have it do the assignment as normal but still do the dump with the name and value is rather nifty.
 
-- #off works?
seems not
 
@GrahamChiu I said I didn't remember the exact syntax, and even if I did it hasn't been tested lately.
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE where's the syntax? It's not in help --
 
10:31 PM
You'll have to look at the source, I'm doing something else right now: %mezz-dump.r
Looks like I called it "dumps" not dumper. I dunno.
Speaking of which, I've been wondering if <opt> should be changed to the more verbose but explicit <nullable>
I still think that even if you can access null variables without causing an error (which is likely going to happen shortly), that doesn't mean functions should take them by default as parameters.
 
10:50 PM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE sounds unclear
 
@GrahamChiu If you want to muck around with the implementation of something like -- I'm sure you are probably aware you can copy that code out into a file and DO it and you'll be using your updated implementation.
You don't have to rebuild Rebol to try tinkering with it.
 

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