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12:10 AM
posted on February 08, 2023 by Ben Mason

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 111 (111.0.5563.19) for iOS; it'll become available on App Store in the next few days. You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. Harry Souders Google Chrome

 
 
5 hours later…
4:49 AM
anyone familiar with selenium python? Need some helps.
 
@CarlCarl Welcome to the JavaScript chat! Please review the room rules. If you have a question, just post it, and if anyone's free and interested they'll help. If you want to report an abusive user or a problem in this room, visit our meta.
 
 
2 hours later…
7:08 AM
I mean... this is like taking a 10 line task and removing the line breaks, then calling it a 1 liner as if that's kind kind of feature — Kevin B 9 hours ago
@KevinB I don't know how you'd feel about this one:
 
 
7 hours later…
2:34 PM
@VLAZ So. Much. Redundancy. In. That. Q&A
 
Oh, right. You missed the discussion about it a couple of days ago.
I've blown my daily post votes on it for a couple of days straight.
 
@VLAZ yea, 'tis hard to keep up ^^"
 
The discussion was in SOCVR, as well.
 
well, that explains why I haven 't seen it :) Don't visit SOCVR often - too much traffic
 
Also, since you're here and I want to complain to somebody about this: I downvoted this answer and it was one of the very few that got updated. IMO, it's now worse than before.
Also, somewhere in that whole mess of answers, somebody went "Didn't work for me. I wrote this Java code which does". Had something like 10 upvotes.
 
3:13 PM
neat
there's an es2016 solution that shows how string templates can be used for concatenation
you know, because that's relevant to capitalizing the first letter
+103
and i'm out of votes
3 more pages
 
@VLAZ "surely the vote was because I used normal function calls instead of tagged templates"... Sigh
@VLAZ this one? Oh, well...
 
@OlegValteriswithUkraine Yes
 
these Q&A monstrosities just make me want to scream
 
3:29 PM
if only we had these, super users, lets call them mods, that could go through and delete all of it
> For TypeScript
(literally just javascript)
 
@OlegValteriswithUkraine Technically it was because it was the bajillionth answer that basically said "uppercase the first letter, concatenate with the rest of the string". But it was apparently taken as a "the bajillion answer that used these exact ways to get the first letter and the rest of the string". And in that latter sense, the answer is now unique.
 
this one is a gem even amongst those, admittedly:
1. Monkey-patching prototypes of global objects;
2. Using regular expressions where they only add overhead;
3. Using the deprecated `substr` method (and no, those answers aren't from 2012)
4. Answering in a completely different language;
5. Ignoring requirements from the question;
6. "Just use the X library";
7. Repeating existing solutions;
8. No explanation "try this" answers;
9. Overly complicated high-overhead bloated solutions;
10. "Here is a one-liner!";
 
Guarentee if you dig through a number of these answerer's answers you'll find similar garbage answers on high traffic questions
 
yeah, I know, I prefer to stay away from those Q&As for exactly the reason of everyone and their dog thinking they can add value by either reiterating the same damn thing for the Nth time or "if you have these <insert extremely specific circumstances>, do <insert a reiteration of what's been said N-1 times>"
@KevinB I can imagine another answer appearing "for TypeScript's strict mode: <insert the same [first char to upper]+[rest to lower]>"
 
they didn't even bother to apply a type to the argument
or to the function
 
3:45 PM
@VLAZ can't argue with it being unique - it's certainly in the "why, just why?" tier now
 
in SO Close Vote Reviewers, yesterday, by VLAZ
I can see maybe 3: 1. Chop of capitalise first char, concatenate the rest 2. regex to sort of do the same. 3. can't really think of anything but maybe.
 
@KevinB that would be too much work.
 
For 3. I think "use a library that does it" fits. The Lodash capitalize is a decent solution, so you don't have to reinvent the wheel if you already use it.
157 solutions are, dare I say it, unacceptable.
And 157 includes deleted answers.
 
i mean
if the op had any hint of it having lodash, sure
 
"How do I do X" -> "Use this library" is an acceptable answer. Not always the most useful but for a general X it's fine.
It's a different matter if it asked "How do I do X in vanilla JS" for example.
Still, I feel like fracturing "How to do X" into "...with library A", "...with library B", "...with library C", etc. isn't quite useful. Should just be one general question with just a few of the major libraries.
 
3:54 PM
@VLAZ you just lack Imagination™
@VLAZ yeah, for the most part, I don't mind library suggestions, however, they do indeed have a tendency to proliferate as time goes on. I completely agree that the proper way is to have a single answer listing major library solutions
 
Is there an advantage to compiling typescript to a newer version of JS?
Do you get more features in Typescript if you target a newer JS version?
 
Less potential discrepancies, less generated code.
And yeah, you do get to use more features. Otherwise you need to polyfill
 
4:09 PM
Does typescript do the polyfilling?
 
No. Polyfills are for functionality - e.g., .flatMap() which won't work with an older target: Playground Link TS can handle syntax level changes. For example class Foo {} can be targetted to ES5 (which doesn't have class) and you get the equivalent generated by TS.
 
polyfilling? No, not really. There are some helpers for transpilation (for example, when you downgrade iteration or have an older target), but nothing beyond that
 
what then should i set my target to in tsconfig?
currently "target": "ES6",
 
Erm, what do you want to target?
It's a circular question, I guess.
 
no polyfills target?
 
4:14 PM
whatever the users will be having as the environment?
@VLAZ sorry for basically echoing :)
 
the browsers should be at oldest 2021?
or 2022
 
Oldest ESR is probably 2021.
 
a safe bet is that by now nearly every environment will support ES6. The rest is a judgement call depending on your specific circumstances
 
But that doesn't mean everything from ES2020 is available in a 2021 browser. Safari is lagging usually, IIRC.
 
4:54 PM
Sup yall, anyone here ever used react-leaflet, the leaflet library?
 
@timventura Welcome to the JavaScript chat! Please review the room rules. If you have a question, just post it, and if anyone's free and interested they'll help. If you want to report an abusive user or a problem in this room, visit our meta.
 
 
1 hour later…
6:08 PM
Day 3 of trying to review all answers in that garbage dump "Q&A". I've used all my votes again. I've not yet gone through all answers, either.
 
posted on February 09, 2023 by Ben Mason

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 111 (111.0.5563.15) for Android. It's now available on Google Play. You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. Harry Souders Google Chrome

 
6:52 PM
posted on February 09, 2023 by Ben Mason

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Dev 112 (112.0.5582.0) for Android. It's now available on Google Play. You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. Krishna Govind Google Chrome

posted on February 09, 2023 by Prudhvikumar Bommana

 The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 111 to the Beta channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 111.0.5563.19 contains our usual under-the-hood performance and stability tweaks, but there are also some cool new features to explore - please head to the Chromium blog to learn more! A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in swit

 

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