« first day (1767 days earlier)   

1:09 AM
@nwp Thank you so much.
 
1:35 AM
@ThePirate42 instead of splitting in two you split by a factor of 1.6
 
2:27 AM
Folks, I see this kind of struct initialization where members of the struct are initialized by name.
const my_struct my_var = {
      .my_member = 12,
      .my_other_member = 24
};
when I try to write an initialization like that, I get an error "E0029 expected an expression" for each member. Visual Studio.
What may be the cause of these compilation errors?
 
2:52 AM
Come to think of it, does this kind of initialization wort differently in C++ and plain C ?
 
 
1 hour later…
3:54 AM
@NickAlexeev Yes. These are "designated initializers". They were added to C quite a while ago (C99, if memory serves). It was added to C++ much more recently (and some compilers don't implement it yet). Big difference between C and C++ is that in C, order doesn't matter but in C++, the order in an initialization list must match order of declaration.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:20 AM
Say I have a static struct A somewhere in the code, which I need to use in a function f in a different file. Functions f calls many other functions which also require A. I have 2 options : get the instance of A in f and pass it around as a parameter to the other functions, or get the instance of A in each of the functions. Which would you rather use? In C
 

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