« first day (3321 days earlier)   

12:02 AM
hello
 
Wes
12:24 AM
@Ekin there are probably cases where interning would be helpful
sorry was cooking. 5 days without carbs. i am freaking out
 
@Girgias None. In PHP, a switch and if/elseif statement have no palpable differences in any area beside flavor. A developer might find the fact that you can see the checks being made more terse, another will find that the way switch is constructed, you can see exactly what to expect.
 
Talking in C level
On the engine
 
Sorry, mis-read.
 
In C, switch immediately sends you to the case (a constant) that it resolved to, skipping others, afaik. "Afaik" because I really, really never had to care. Frankly, there's no difference between them and it's just preference.
I agree with if/elseif. If you have a lot of complex logic, it's kinda...weird to look at a switch statement. Plus, when you're inside switch, you obviously hit a break and so, you're forced to resume your thinking from outside the switch block. I like the fact that when I write if/elseif, you're pretty much in the same block mentally.
 
Wes
12:42 AM
do you think circular references should be avoided by design, or are they inevitable?
 
If you meet circular reference in PHP, you're absolutely doing something crazy wrong. You should extrapolate the functionality that's making both classes depend on each other available to another class and make the classes depend on it.
Is Circular Ref. even possible when using dependency injection in PHP?
(Assuming each class needs the other to even start)
 
Wes
i don't think it's hard to hit them lol
 
Got code? I wanna see what's attempted.
 
Wes
classic parent child relationship
child having means to access the parent, and the parent having means to access to the children
 
Sure, but that's not circular dependency? If we take Clubs for example which might ask for City $city, Team $team in the constructor, we can also see that Cities also requires, in its constrctuctor a City $city. Given the way PHP works, you should have $city initialized before.
 
Wes
1:02 AM
@DanielSmith so you are saying i should never do this stuff gist.github.com/Netmosfera/608090da014144f588db044c322fed61
and stick to "pure" dependency injection
you said "i am doing something crazy wrong" like it's rare doing that sort of stuff
but it's not rare, because you can create the self dependency at a large distance without you not even being aware of it
it happens much less with immutable stuff, as you said i cannot construct B if depends on A, and i cannot construct A if depends on B
but i can do $b->setA($a); and $a->setB($b)
that is nasty but the problem is often you don't even realize you create a self dependency
 
But that is not CD. You're "deflating" the issue with parent::construct and initializing $this->child = new AdoptedChild. In the process, everything becomes not only hidden, but hard to follow.
What I said was "who writes code like this?".
 
Wes
like, millions of people?
ftr i am not saying it's nice
but $child->getparent() and $parent->getChild() is extremely common
and that requires some sort of circular dependency
 
Ok, hold on. Is it right to assume that you're in a situation where both Clubs and Cities depend on classes of type City?
 
Wes
$team->located_in_city->teams_in_city[4] === $team
i don't know what clubs means, i realized :B what's the difference with team?
$team contains a link to $city, $city contains a link to all the teams it hosts, including $team
 
1:17 AM
Aha, I get it. But this is a non-issue. Again, this is not CD at all. CD is a situation where you hit a race condition because a class depends on another and that class itself too depends on the one...you get it. Each one of these objects instantiates with clear dependencies which can never enter CD.
 
Wes
it is a weird aggregate but you get the idea :B
 
It's not weird, but there's no CD there.
 
Wes
how do you call it?
i call it self dependency, or circular dependency
always called that way
or self reference
 
Then I think you have the wrong impression of what the term means and it'll lead to confusion. These main three classes simply depend on a class of interface City when they instantiate. Nothing more.
 
Wes
no
 
1:20 AM
Try to instantiate these classes.
 
Wes
team depends on city, city depends on team
class Team{ public function __construct(City $hostCity); }
class City{ public function __construct(Set<Team> $hostedTeams); }
you cannot construct city unless you constructed the team first
and you cannot construct the team unless you constructed city first
 
...and that code will not run at all.
 
For me, that is objectievly bad, because it instantiates a dependency - hardcodes is. I've written software that is now used by millions under the hood and I've never had this issue to solve.
never reached the point where I need to solve this issue*
 
Wes
class Team{ public function setHostCity(City $city); }
class City{ public function __construct(Set<Team> $hostedTeams); }
 
1:25 AM
Yes, setters solve this issue instantly.
 
Wes
except that's not a true dependency
aka it's pretty bad and that is why i prefer the approach in the gist
 
Correct. You're hiding dependencies under setters.
That's why setters are bad.
...well, in a purist way, at least.
 
Wes
which is pretty much the approach used by most of aggregates having that kind of api
 
But why do you need this, again? You're hardcoding a dependency inside. You make achange, it goes boom.
There's no real case, ever, trust me, because I wrote something akin to Laravel for WordPress (in an environment where everything's fucked) and thrived to do this in PHP.
You are thinking about your issue wrong, whatever it is.
 
Wes
the original question was, "what do you think about... ?"
 
1:28 AM
Ah, it was just a theoretical talk, I see!
 
Wes
i don't have a strong opinion
 
That is good. Nor do I. Ever.
Can you come up with a real world situation where that solution will be better over simply what I showed you? It's how I test my "opinions".
 
Wes
but i have experimented with all possibilities over the years
 
Yes, but the answer to the question of Teams depend on Cities and Cities depend on Teams is...for them not to depend on each other, but rather on CitiesProvider and TeamsProvider :D
A City should know what Team it needs and a Team should know what City it needs. Therefore they just need to depend on A PLACE to get these items from.
 
Wes
sure
 
1:31 AM
Which will, in turn, not create any DC :)
 
Wes
i had a repository that allowed me to locate a parent from one of its children
but it was extremely clumsy
 
How can it have been clumsy?
 
Wes
imagine you have a bunch of relationships in the aggregate that is not just a simple parent-child
you end up with a bunch of ugly methods
 
No, you don't have to.
Let me show you.
 
Wes
also, since you don't have a direct access from a child to the parent
you have to cache it yourself in the repository
private $parentsOfChild[$childID] = $parentObject;
it's a major clusterfuck :B
but ultimately all solutions have pros and cons
 
1:41 AM
In essence, this is a service container / provider coupled with a dependency injection manager do for you.
At a very dumb level.
REMEMBER. In PHP, objects are passed by "assingment by reference". Basically, objects are never inherited and made local to the objects that ingest them.
As such, it's not an optimization problem to do this.
But if you make City depend on Team and Team on City, even an auto-wiring DI package will fail. Because you're making it hit a race condition.
Wish I could refer you to an easy to understand DI (in terms of source) so you can see how they do it and why it's the only sane way, but, to be fair, they're complex because they need to be and it's hard to see exactly what they're doing at a base, raw level.
Sorry, you can't edit and I don't wanna confuse anyone: this is not what a service container / provider / DI do for you, but it's how they expect you to think about your classes and therefore you see what problems they solve for you. You should always think about your hierarchy and if you meet cases where you logically can't explain a dependency, you have a problem and if that problem's solution is to hide depenendecies: when you make a chance, everything breaks.
 

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