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12:34 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
1:48 AM
Anybody know if there is a way to specify a version of glibc when building?
 
 
4 hours later…
5:38 AM
@Mikhail I tried for a week to find a good solution. The best is still to just run a full target environment. In a docker container or something
 
Yeah thats exactly what I did for years but I no longer control my own destiny :-(
 
You could try to get a cross compiler going and there's some random linker scripts in GitHub
 
Spent all day trying to figure out build issues that can be summarized as "nix does something weird to dynamic library paths" and "not everybody runs the same version of nix-env"
Basically I have a .so built but can't get it running through python because python is made with glibc 2.31 and my program builds against glibc 2.32. Should be tolerable to mix glibcs between the main program and a .so but apparent it isn't...
also have a really massive headache :-/
 
Yeah. Besides glibc there's also random things like the path to the root certificate paths if you link some SSL lib. Linux really sucks for mixing binaries
 
Is there any way to unblock thread which are blocked on named message queue function mq_receive.
I checked mq_close and mq_unlink does not unblock the mq_receive
 
5:46 AM
in general you can supply a timeout
although frankly posix stuff is bug prone and you should use a condition variable and C++
 
mq_timedreceive I can use but that will wake up thread un-necessarily all the time, I just wanted this when gracefully exiting
 
   ssize_t mq_timedreceive(mqd_t mqdes, char *restrict msg_ptr,
                      size_t msg_len, unsigned int *restrict msg_prio,
                      const struct timespec *restrict abs_timeout);
has a timeout
mq_timedreceive() behaves just like mq_receive(), except that if
       the queue is empty and the O_NONBLOCK flag is not enabled for the
       message queue description, then abs_timeout points to a structure
       which specifies how long the call will block.
but for real stop using this API
 
Yes posix got bugs but what to do ORG restrictions
 
I mean standard C++ is less buggy
This is "bug prone" in the sense that it is unlikely that anybody can write the code without errors, posix bug not withstanding.
although if I were doing code review I'd prefer you just push a "terminate" message rather than have a timeout
 
Even I am thinking to just exit with the exit()
 
5:54 AM
Thats some low quality stuff
 
hahahhaha
yeah thats why my heart is not agreeing
 
"your code gave me a heart attack"\
 
hahaha
 
Ahh looks beautiful
I am wondering which company is hiring these strict stackoverflow guys, strict in code quality, because I just get good advices on SO no where else
 
6:00 AM
strict in code quality usually means its a pretty big place, or boring product
 
haha
 
6:12 AM
In my signal handler I need to open the queue for writing and push the "terminate" message, does that give you a heart attack or it seems ok
 
depends, I assume you're already using the queue for something else?
 
yes users can instruct daemon what operation to perform
 
yeah so then having a special "terminate" message is fine
 
but on few signals we need to exit and thus I cannot make users to push the "terminate" message
It will just be a empty message I am thinking:
while (run)
{
bytes = mq_receive();
if (bytes == 0)
{
continue;
}
}

// then in signal handler
handler()
{
run = false;
send empty message
}
 
that looks fine, i'd opt for a more complicated message if not because of possible spurious stuff
 
6:20 AM
Ok then maybe let it be some message instead of empty, will see.
Btw, thanks for you time. and for the laughs
 
Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
 
Sure :)
 
 
1 hour later…
7:41 AM
 
8:37 AM
Hehe, I would instead say:
"Because they can't C"
I wanted to put C++ but its not rhyming
 
 
2 hours later…
11:06 AM
@Mikhail irony that the IDE there is VS
 
maybe he's programming in J#
 
11:32 AM
Ah J#... Java (literally) with less suck
 
11:51 AM
Thought MS tried to promote C# as Java with less suck. Personally I think HTML is the language with the least sucks :p
 
nwp
TelKitty programs in HTML.
 
I have to be able to program in many languages before I can claim what I think is the best language.
 
@TelKitty C# really only came about after Sun sued MS for their custom Java runtime that beat the pants off of sun's
 
IMHO, the language that sucks the least has to be easy to learn and still works even when you have made a small error.
 
The Microsoft Java Virtual Machine (MSJVM) is a discontinued proprietary Java virtual machine from Microsoft. It was first made available for Internet Explorer 3 so that users could run Java applets when browsing on the World Wide Web. It was the fastest Windows-based implementation of a Java virtual machine for the first two years after its release. Sun Microsystems, the creator of Java, sued Microsoft in October 1997 for incompletely implementing the Java 1.1 standard. It was also named in the United States v. Microsoft Corp. antitrust civil actions, as an implementation of Microsoft's "Embrace...
 
11:58 AM
kind of interesting how how Google v Oracle went, considering how the whole J# saga played out
 
I was wondering the same thing.
Google LLC v. Oracle America, Inc. was a legal case within the United States related to the nature of computer code and copyright law. The dispute centered on the use of parts of the Java programming language's application programming interfaces (APIs) and about 11,000 lines of source code, which are owned by Oracle (through subsidiary, Oracle America, Inc., originating from Sun Microsystems), within early versions of the Android operating system by Google. Google has since transitioned Android to a copyright-unburdened engine without the source code, and has admitted to using the APIs but claimed...
 
I think the technological and eco-system realities were quite a bit different at the time. I can definately understand that the MS lawyers settled instead of trying to fight that in the courts
 
@PeterT The oracle case was IMO much more money seeking than Sun was, MS really hadn't fully implemented Java previously
whereas Google did
 
Sure, Suns demands seemed very reasonable. But I think the whole context about the DOJ anti-trust investigation into MS happening at the same time might've also played into their decisions.
 
I think it very much did, IIRC Sun had investments in Netscape too... but I could be wrong
 
12:04 PM
Sad reality is that there may not be a winner, it will only depend on who bankrupts first. Just like law suits for large inheritance - who ever dies first lose by default.
 
nwp
Death is indeed difficult to recover from.
 
Zombies and Vampires seem to disagree
 
On the other hand, the more law suits there are, the better job prospect for lawyers.
 
nwp
That's not on the other hand. That's also bad.
 
Part of your country's tax come from lawyers. You need them to be employed and not be some jobless bums who claim social security month after month.
 
nwp
12:15 PM
It's difficult to assess how much value they generate and how much damage they do, but I'm pretty sure it's not worth it.
 
12:35 PM
Today world does not promote providing real value and progress to human societies. Leeches are every where.
IMHO, if we do not keep on escaping, out of earth, out of solar system, out of our galaxy. Sooner or later, we are all going to be eliminated from this universe.
Propagating throughout the universe is actually a probability trick.
 
nwp
It's also completely infeasible with near future technology.
Earth is insanely nice compared to everything else we have a clue about.
 
If you have not put enough resources in it, how can you expect it to progress?
 
nwp
Colonizing the north pole is so much easier than another planet.
@TelKitty We do put plenty of resources into it, without expecting much in return. We get some Mars pics and maybe we even find alien bacteria, possibly even alive. That's about the best case scenario.
 
A basket is a great place to put your eggs in. But putting all your eggs in that basket for eternity is just stupid.
The boiling frog is a fable describing a frog being slowly boiled alive. The premise is that if a frog is put suddenly into boiling water, it will jump out, but if the frog is put in tepid water which is then brought to a boil slowly, it will not perceive the danger and will be cooked to death. The story is often used as a metaphor for the inability or unwillingness of people to react to or be aware of sinister threats that arise gradually rather than suddenly. While some 19th-century experiments suggested that the underlying premise is true if the heating is sufficiently gradual, according to...
@nwp I believe human societies are running at very low efficiencies right now.
 
nwp
@TelKitty The analogy doesn't work because it's not for a lack of trying. The area around the water is toxic and the temperature is deadly. We do want to go, but we also know every jump out of the pot is certain death. For now.
 
12:45 PM
Productivity in agriculture and manufacturing have increased many folds, yet people are still working long hours yet produce less children. Something does not add up.
 
nwp
@TelKitty So do I.
@TelKitty It ads up perfectly. People want a certain number of children, roughly 2. Child mortality means you have to produce more children. Less child mortality means you can get away with less children.
 
So if we increase productivity from, say 30% to say 80%, we would have enough resources for space exploration.
 
nwp
I doubt it. That makes the frog jump 50% farther, but it still lands in certain death and we know that. We can kinda sorta very blurrily see how far we'd need to jump and there just is no way we can.
 
But there is not only 1 frog, there are many frogs. Some will die during the process, but some will stay alive and propagate.
Like I said, it's a probability thing.
 
nwp
It's not a probability thing. You can't just strap a billion people to a billion rockets and hope you get lucky eventually.
It's a technology thing. You need better radiation shielding, rockets and a ton of other stuff that we just have no clue how to make.
Maybe in a couple hundred years it becomes viable, but that seems like wishful thinking, not realistic.
Fixing the problems we have here is much more realistic.
@nwp Inb4 "not with that attitude"
 
12:55 PM
If you don't buy lottery, you can never win lottery. The more you buy, the higher chance you would win. If you goal is not to win more money but money laundering a large sum, then buy more lottery is the way to go ...
Also, if you train people to aim to have a 9-6 job and hopefully make more money, then how many people are you expecting to make great innovations?
Domestic chickens walk more than fly because they are trained to walk.
 
 
3 hours later…
3:57 PM
@TelKitty all of those with enough time to work on side projects =w=
 
4:13 PM
@TelKitty We already have enough resources for space exploration. We've just chosen to use those resources in different ways. Most people simply don't consider space exploration a high priority.
 

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