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2:52 AM
_/¯(ツ)_/¯
why is chat cutting \s ?
 
Why twisted arms, is this a protester after fought with the police? :x
 
 
3 hours later…
5:56 AM
Another day, another article on how people do not want to return to the offices and prefer to work from home. As someone who majored in economics (and not affected much by this) it's always fun to watch how this falls out - the power struggle between CBD/employment centre landlords(and landladies) vs capitalists & employers vs employees.
 
in C#, Oct 14 at 15:11, by Hans1984
୧༼ಠ益ಠ༽୨ riot ୧༼ಠ益ಠ༽୨
 
 
1 hour later…
7:13 AM
@Morwenn Yeah rather easy read but I couldn't tell if its criticism or just a description of std::once_flag :-)
 
8:11 AM
I learnt what it did when it failed
 
Meta analysis says its more POSIX leaking into C++ :-)
 
A classic
 
 
1 hour later…
9:34 AM
The only tasks left on my release checklist are "brag about it" and "start working on the next version"
As far as I'm concerned this is a successful release :')
 
Do you think you're making the world a worse place by supporting ugly data structures like std::list?
 
9:49 AM
No
Blindly hating on std::list is stupid
 
@Morwenn I hate std::list with one eye open.
 
Knowing why it's bad and when it's a decent solution for a problem at hand is the key to making the world a better place
Now there isn't much we can do about the dumb per-element allocation scheme...
 
Is there any good place to use std::list?
lol per-element allocation
 
Whenever you need iterator stability and you can afford the allocation fuckup
 
At least of features in commonly used programming languages do what they promise to do, unlike some leadership in certain countries - promise your paradise but give you hell.
 
9:52 AM
If your algorithm handles O(n) elements and you need a data structure of size O(log n) with iterator stability it's probably good enough
 
I mean the only real use is if you need to insert elements but for some reason you're not doing the O(N) lookup because maybe you look at the first element or something (like in the kernel). Although I suspect a bunch of profiling shows that for small structures std::vector is better due to avoiding memory allocations...
I've just never had to use it so I assume everybody who is using std::list is wrong
 
Here is an example I have: I've got a sorting algorithms that keeps track of the runs it finds, with a maximum of O(log n) runs. I store them in a list and merge pairwise, using a list allows me to easily remove every two runs while merging pairwise, all while keeping iterator stability (I don't remember why I needed it here, but I do remember that I needed it at some point)
I didn't use std::list a lot, and I have to admit that I replaced it with a hand-rolled one where it was too much of a performance hog
But it's still a useful tool from time to time
I used a list to implement this algorithm because doing it without a list was horrible: codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/116367/…
 
I think your first example was motivated by iterator stability which seems like a case of indirection leading to more complications :-)
 
A lot of the times people use std::list with a lot less than a million items, they just have maybe tens or hundreds of items, running time really is of no issue.
 
Iterator stability is literally the most useful feature of lists tbh
 
10:02 AM
I was going to congratulate somebody for actually answering on Code Review :-)
Got anymore C++ metaprograming articles?
I need to learn C++ in 7 days
 
I can give you a Ruby book
 
I've done too much php, although I can understand why variables are prefixed with the cash symbol
 
I have a bunch of link to metaprogramming articles, slides and tricks in this issue and in this one
But it's often arcane shit
Otherwise just find the CppCon GitHub, take any year's repository and lookup for the talks with "metaprogramming" or "template" in their name
 
Oh I've read one of these: Improving error messages in C++ by transporting substitution failures
 
Which is pretty arcane IMO
There is a whole series of articles about the kvasir metaprogramming library which are pretty mindblowing, but also generally doesn't describe tricks you need unless you're making metaprogramming at a ridiculous scale
You can probably find a few articles about stateful metaprogramming around the web too, but due to no compiler support it's extremely wonky and little used
 
10:08 AM
Yeah I was kinda more interested in stateful stuff
Was hoping to prototype meaningful scheduling at compile time :-)
 
Well, the general wisdom is "don't do it"
In C++20 you can get easy stateful metaprogramming fuckiness with lambdas as default template parameters
 
10:48 AM
I still miss good articles about tricks can do by abusing explicit deduction guides
I remember having seen a few nifty examples to solve issues that are otherwise hard to solve, but I lack a good intuition for those
 
 
3 hours later…
2:16 PM
when you post a comment like that you really wonder what they are trying to benchmark
 
 
6 hours later…
8:36 PM
posted on October 26, 2020 by Herb Sutter

This video actually posted about two weeks ago, but… busy! Sorry. Here it is, I hope you enjoy it. Note that as of this writing the Clang-based prototype implementation on Godbolt is not yet complete, in particular it still needs to implement out and forward parameters.

 
9:34 PM
Sep 22 '15 at 21:21, by elyse
Herb Slutter
 
10:10 PM
 
 
1 hour later…
11:15 PM
yo
 
yoboy
 
gotta learn more meta programing
Retention is low because I can't seem to find a problem to work on
Also my neural network failed to converge and my future employer prefers tiny Apple products (Free laptop is nice, but tiny...)
 
You could try to get my library to work on MSVC
That would surely teach you all the ways MSVC can ICE or randomly fail SFINAE things
 
I mean I know that already :-(
Also I used MSVC + NVCC
minor version updates would break my main software, and randomly switching in boost:: versions of std:: things to avoid ICEs
 
oof
 
11:19 PM
horror
 
11:30 PM
So is there any way to use KDE as a replacement in the OS X operating system?
 

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