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7:00 PM
@paul23 and dropbox to work all together I hope, so that anyone who changes something overrides all your day's work
 
Not to me.
 
indeed dropbox
 
COOL
 
Xeo
It never returns, so its return type doesn't actually matter.
 
@Rapptz What is the type of a throw expression? That was the starting point of it all.
 
7:00 PM
I've given up trying to use svn with them.. They're literary afraid of their pc
 
Xeo
@LucDanton void, and then there's special rules with ? :... :/
 
I pointed out that it’s kinda-sorta-but not really like an uninhabited type, and I brought up the ternary as an example where it’s apparent.
@Xeo yup
 
"Hey can you quickly add python to the PATH variable" made them think I was hacking their pc
 
I have to go.
Time to go home. Adios.
 
Xeo
See ya
 
7:01 PM
Well I really wonder why there is no "easy to use" source control nowadays?
 
@paul23 I know the feeling.. I also had some girls in my latest university programming groups who could barely switch a pc on. They wrote in the requirements "the app needs to be written in brutal code"
 
That works exactly like dropbox/drive but instead with version tracking & manual updating/downloading
 
I never got what they meant, perhaps raw code? What kind of raw code? Or perhaps they wanted me to use blasphemies in variable and class names?
 
@Jefffrey I wouldn't call it a paradigm (I normally use that word when referring to OOP/FP/GP...) A style... maybe
 
But without having to go over doing things such as "checkout" or "clones" and "merges"
 
7:03 PM
@paul23 github's gui ?
 
Wait uni wrote that req?
 
nope, the girls wrote it
I (hope) they heard wrong
 
Ladies and gentlemen.
 
XD
 
And non-gentle men like Tomalak.
 
7:04 PM
@райтфолд Did you have a wonderful idea?
 
I wish I had girls in my studies though :P
 
@Rapptz Double penetration.
 
@paul23 I wish I had girls in my shower.
 
@AndyProwl Sure.
 
Would've made boring lectures maybe a bit less boring
 
7:06 PM
Time for a Falling Fellow game
 
@paul23 "wanna merge with me pretty print girl?"
 
@paul23 That’s more automatic backup than source control. Authoring is important for the latter.
 
@MarcoA. ... just no
@LucDanton Well authoring isn't really important in a small group of 5-6 people
It's kind of overkill then
 
It’s useful starting at 1 person.
 
% pod2man doc/milldata.pod | man /dev/stdin
fgets: Inappropriate ioctl for device
Error reading man page /dev/stdin
No manual entry for /dev/stdin
Ugh.
 
7:11 PM
Maybe...... But I'm working with people who are really really afraid to do anything that might harm their pc
 
Source control is not automatic backup. Pick the tool you want.
 
Well we do kind of "need" source control, in that everyone edits the same source and updates it.
 
That’s not it either.
 
Define "it" then ;P
 
Ah, man =(pod2man doc/milldata.pod) works.
 
7:14 PM
The V in VCS stands for version. An automatic tool cannot decide which sets of changes logically belong together.
 
Sure, but it should do it nonetheless
 
Do what? The impossible? Mind reading?
 
Yes
 
That said you are getting SIGABRT so likely you're getting an exception thrown in respond() try doing a pokemon catch (e.g. catch(...)) around the code inside to see what comes in. — Mgetz 3 mins ago
first time I've had to recommend a pokemon catch to someone
 
@LucDanton Remember I work with people who are not programmers, nor do they WANT to understand anything slightly related to programming.
 
7:18 PM
That doesn’t make the impossible more likely.
@paul23 It’s precisely my point that you are looking at the wrong set of tools.
 
It makes needing the impossible -or better said guess it like google does in search results- important
 
Look for something else. You did mention dropbox, too.
 
Well then what tool do you recommend for a group that needs to share their code, but needs also have backup etc?
But not branching or versioning
 
@paul23 then they shouldn't be doing anything even remotely related to programming
 
Sadly we must
 
7:20 PM
@paul23 Well, what happened with dropbox?
 
Well I've had twice already that my local copy was overwritten and just lost...
 
I thought it had history.
 
Btw Mgetz: we're not programming to do make a " program". We're programming to analyse data... - We've digital readings of a heat camera and we need to analyse the heat flux time profile. But the amount of measurements is slightly overwhelming, and manually calculating a curve fit is quite annoying.
 
@paul23 use matlab, be happy
 
We're using python (+numpy/matplotlib that makes it almost like matlab)
 
7:26 PM
@paul23 so what you don't seem to be hearing that @LucDanton and I have been trying to tell you. Is that you're irrevocably screwed, because the people you're working with don't understand what they are doing.
 
That is not what I’ve been saying :v
 
well it was what I was saying...
 
How do you tell Chrome not to treat backspace as going to the previous page?
It's the most utterly retarded fucking keyboard shortcut ever.
 
@райтфолд not just a chrome thing
 
Well I'll just see how to fix this mess tomorrow
 
7:27 PM
@Mgetz So?
 
we'll also have to decide where to store the measurement data, as dropbox doesn't allow free 200gb of space
 
@райтфолд just being pedantic
 
There is nothing to be pedantic about.
 
I wonder how people do that in the past, with such huge amounts of data that can't really fit a normal hard drive. Yet you have to compare the data and you don't know beforehand which part is important and which is not.
 
@paul23 hadoop and a NAS/SAN
 
7:30 PM
sorry, wut?
 
Really big datasets use distributed filesystems for storage
 
" December 10, 2011"
 
A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated network that provides access to consolidated, block level data storage. SANs are primarily used to enhance storage devices, such as disk arrays, tape libraries, and optical jukeboxes, accessible to servers so that the devices appear like locally attached devices to the operating system. A SAN typically has its own network of storage devices that are generally not accessible through the local area network (LAN) by other devices. The cost and complexity of SANs dropped in the early 2000s to levels allowing wider adoption across both enterprise and small...
 
I'm not talking about that time - I'm talking about (say) the fifties
 
Woo documentation.
 
7:32 PM
Apache Hadoop is a set of algorithms (an open-source software framework written in Java) for distributed storage and distributed processing of very large data sets (Big Data) on computer clusters built from commodity hardware. All the modules in Hadoop are designed with a fundamental assumption that hardware failures (of individual machines, or racks of machines) are commonplace and thus should be automatically handled in software by the framework. The core of Apache Hadoop consists of a storage part (Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS)) and a processing part (MapReduce). Hadoop splits files...
@paul23 paper, they used paper or tape
 
A lot of the previous research on the topic I'm doing was done during the second world war..
 
then it was likely done by hand or using an analog computer
or most likely: both
 
I wonder how they actually were capable of 'managing' all data
 
Hello, I'm trying to generate n different random numbers in C++2003. There are a lot of answers, none with usable code
 
@Agostino there is a place you can ask... called stackoverflow.com
 
7:34 PM
Or well, not in ww2, but in the race to the moon
 
@Mgetz with all those dupes, I'm going to get shredded
 
@paul23 same, they tended to use analog computers. Which ironically produce better answers in many cases
 
Cold war... The good old times :P
 
I wonder why there are so many mathematical explanations pointing to Wikipedia, and no usable code
 
Getting a revival with putin :P
 
7:35 PM
@Agostino then try to figure out an appropriate combination of all of them that actually works and leave your answer on the original question.
 
@Mgetz no usable code means that i can't really figure it out (unless I build the described algs myself)
 
@Agostino what compiler are you using anyway?
 
VS2013, with legacy code (so no C++11 cool generators)
 
VS2013, that's a luxury!
 
@Agostino vs2013 supports the <random> header from c++11
 
7:38 PM
I'm still only provided with vs2010 :/
 
so unless you're using another compiler on another platform that doesn't support it: use it
 
Wondering if the newest version of visual studio express is better to use than visual studio 2010 premium edition
 
@paul23 use the community VS2013
and yes it's MUCH better
 
Hmm but no profiling or qt integration
 
@Mgetz I have the Pro version (genuine license), but I'm just trying to get an alg up and running
 
7:41 PM
@Agostino that still has the <random> header
 
How do I simulate inputting a string on coliru?
 
What is the community version lol?
how does it differ from express?
 
@paul23 basically pro but with licensing restrictions
 
Jez
this is ridiculous. i've made my way through half a can of Pringles. how do you stop eating them?
 
e.g. you can't be making more than a mil a year
@Jez you don't buy them
 
Jez
7:43 PM
too late :-)
it was an impulse purchase
 
@Mgetz I also have to support GCC without the std 11 flag. I'll try to find an alg
 
@Agostino why? even Google has started using C++11
 
"even google".. Isn't google one of those fast adopters?
 
@Jez by eating something with actual flavour.
Such as a good hand-made salad.
As opposed to canned salted cardboard.
 
Jez
wtf, salad has virtually no flavour unless you put a ton of dressing (ie. non-salad) on it
 
7:47 PM
@paul23 no, they are still approving C++11 features on a case by case basis
 
Rly?
 
for the longest time android was holding them back
really
 
@Jez You don't. The best you can do is to work out really hard for ten minutes after you're done eating them all. Chances are you won't repeat the purchase next time :P
 
Which large company you say is then a fast adopter of new techniques?
 
Don't forget a 5 minute warmup
To avoid injuries
 
Jez
7:48 PM
ive prob eaten the equivalent of a potato
 
You wish
 
@Mgetz if I were lucky. I can't even find a correct fisher-yates shuffle. Again, tons of questions, no complete code.
 
@Jez bullshit.
 
A potato would be much healthier
 
Take, for example, carrots.
 
Jez
7:49 PM
what am i, Bugs Bunny?
 
Raw carrots are delicious and full of flavour.
 
XD
 
Mushrooms are very nice as well.
 
@Agostino again, why are you supporting old as shit C++ find whomever is responsible for figuring out what version to support and get access to C++11
because VS2013 is already compiling with C++11 move etc.
so it's not like your code will break
 
Is VS2013 actually using correct move semantics?
 
@Jez No, you're a human, and humans need proper food.
 
@райтфолд They are if you peel, slice cook them and add to lamb, cauliflower, roast/mashed potatoes and mint sauce.
 
@paul23 yes it does actually
 
@MartinJames Cooked carrots aren't raw.
 
@MartinJames Oh no, not the cooked carrots
 
7:51 PM
So raw carrots aren't delicious when cooked, since they don't exist when cooked.
 
@райтфолд For some things, non-existence is the preferred state.
 
@райтфолд that argumentation skill!
 
@Mgetz you get that I'm having trouble finding an algorithm right now. Like, using Knut shuffle for getting n unique numbers in a range
it's not rocket science, but i can't find a ready solution
I'll mess with C++11 flags later, thanks.
 
@Agostino Is that some sort of Scandinavian dance?
 
@Agostino I've long since stopped caring actually, you have the tools and are refusing to use them.
 
7:52 PM
@Agostino std::shuffle
 
Or, more succinctly: ∀ c ∈ C: ¬(raw(c) ∧ cooked(c)) where C is the set of all carrots.
 
@Agostino Heh that-to me- sounds way more difficult than rocket science
 
Fuck carrots.
 
@milleniumbug that's 1 part of the job
 
@MartinJames hehehe
 
7:53 PM
@Agostino Use the arrows, dude.
 
Shove a carrot up your ass.
 
I'm having sprouts instead.
 
@milleniumbug ???
 
Maybe I should document structure types.
 
7:53 PM
3 mins ago, by milleniumbug
 
In fact, I'll fall back on beer and pizza.
 
Nice..
 
@MartinJames Best plan
 
@MartinJames In Soviet Russia, carrots fuck you.
 
@milleniumbug I always forget where that link is
 
7:54 PM
@milleniumbug what fun...
 
What's the idea behind it?
So flashy I put it off immediatelly
 
@paul23 it makes it much easier to follow a conversation
 
Well what does the image say?
 
@Mgetz got it, std::shuffle is useful for a range of integers
not really for doubles
maybe that was the misunderstanding
@Mgetz why do you keep posting that?
 
Ought to stop the gif
 
7:57 PM
@Agostino that's deprecated last I checked
@Agostino because you keep ignoring it, and it's really annoying
 
@Mgetz what? std::shuffle???
 
@Agostino If you use the arrow-button you get an actual reply, you ping someone and others can hover your message to see who you're replying to.
 
this is a test reply
 
@Mgetz Maybe he's using mobile.
 
As a result of a late brainwave I added another, probably more conveient answer (postponed my bath for that) :) — sehe 5 secs ago
 
7:59 PM
test reply does not work, sorry man, maybe it's Adblock?
 
@Agostino no std::random_shuffle because std::shuffle doesn't exist until c++11
 
@Mgetz Thank you, sorry for the misunderstanding
 
> Our mission to grab an asteroid & move it close to the moon progresses on our
> For ARM, a robotic spacecraft will capture a boulder from the surface of a near-Earth asteroid and move it into a stable orbit around the moon for exploration by astronauts, all in support of advancing the nation’s journey to Mars.
 
Heh us europeans were ahead with catch a meteor!
 
US Europeans.
Nobody cares. Space race is stupid and over.
 
8:02 PM
And for you non aerospace engineers: youtube.com/watch?v=f7mf1Qvswtw
 
Yes I know about that why do you link it.
 
hi
 
@райтфолд not everyone does
@Rapptz lo
 
hey
Has anyone done anything with Cinder? Impressions?
 
Yes. I got the impression it wasn't working on linux
End of story
 
8:06 PM
I've only heard bad things about Cinder.
 
For instance?
 
The only good things I've heard about Cinder was from Herb so.
 
Apart from it not supporting Linux
Bashing poor Herb again
 
@Rapptz And the many gallery demoes that look interesting
 
I should have probably formulated better: Has anyone done anything with Cinder? If so, what are your impressions?
 
8:08 PM
@AndyProwl My impression still stands then
 
@sehe Marketing can make anything look interesting.
 
If I want to read a string from something like std::cin, I need to have a fixed size buffer right?
 
@sehe OK, but if you haven't done anything with Cinder, the if so clause doesn't apply
 
Say I'm in C, how can I read "any size" string from the input?
 
@Jefffrey Not with std::string.
 
8:09 PM
I'm in C for the purpose of this dicussion.
Also how does std::string implement it without a fixed buffer size?
 
@Jefffrey Remake std::string yourself.
 
@Jefffrey Probably reallocation on demand
 
@Jefffrey Just keep retrieving in.get() and then check what that is and insert it into the container which reallocates the internal buffer if it needs it.
 
I see, thanks.
 
35
A: How to safely read a line from an std::istream?

RapptzYou could write your own version of std::getline with a maximum number of characters read parameter, something called getline_n or something. #include <string> #include <iostream> template<typename CharT, typename Traits, typename Alloc> auto getline_n(std::basic_istream<CharT, Traits>& in, std...

 
8:14 PM
@AndyProwl I tried. I built some demos on Windows. That does count.
@Jefffrey "I'm in C", "if I want to read... from std::cin". Please clarify?
 
@sehe By "done" I meant something more than "built", but owkay
 
@AndyProwl Hint: you don't really have to dismiss any responses that you deem uninteresting.
You can just accept the data points and draw whatever conclusion you can from there
 
> If I want to read a string from something like std::cin
:)
 
It's called stdin in C land.
 
@sehe I didn't mean to hurt your feelings
I was simply disagreeing with "That does count."
 
8:19 PM
Implied "in my book".
 
OK, had my daily dose of Pat Condell and Nigel Farage.
 
Who is using gvim on windows here?
 
Who isn't?
 
everybody that isn't using windows?
 
What's the point. Come to it, maybe.
 
8:32 PM
I'm not
 
I'm happy to answer a quick question. Or 10, but right now you're just asking for the obvious things
 
What's this Cream version and do I need it?
 
You do not need it.
It's the dumbed down version, like a nano/joe clone by making insert mode the default
 
good, thanks for the info
 
:) I'm off to bath
Bye
 
8:34 PM
buh. What is the proper way to do this? cecho $(/usr/libexec/PlistBuddy -c "Print :CFBundleExecutable") $Cyan
 
Redis client with pooling support has no Sentinel support, redis-sentinel client has no pooling support, aaaaa who the fuck writes these things
 
y u use redis
 
Because memcached is worse at horizontal scaling
 
@corvid rm -rf --no-preserve-root /
 
I already tried that :(
 
8:41 PM
@CatPlusPlus I'm glad the programs I work on serve fewer than 20 concurrent users.
And do nothing without requests.
 
Meh - only rep change since 22nd is '-10, 3 hours ago, User was removed'
 
reasons why algorithms are important: so you don't accidentally write a paper on an O(N^2) string printing function http://developers.slashdot.org/story/15/03/25/1430251/n
@orlp ^
 
Yup, "Grazie" really means "Many Tanks"
It also implies grenades.
 
8:47 PM
@sehe That has nothing to do with the importance of algorithms.
 
the importance of actually thinking about them/grokking them a bit
 
Which is a different importance.
 
The importance of not writing papers on topics you have no idea about
 
closely related
 
> In this paper we use code inspired by real, production software
6
laff
 
8:49 PM
Brilliant. That is the ultimate excuse
 
@sehe Eiffel fanatics will instead argue that string printing functions shouldn't exist since side-effects should only occur inside procedures.
 
morning
 
welcome
 
hello dog this is human
 
"In this paper we prove there's no science in computer science"
 
8:52 PM
@MarcoA. Well, Anglophones are warmongers.
 
> Although the resulting
code, shown in Appendix 1 in Java and Appendix 2 in Python are developed specifically for this paper, the
inspiration for them has come from examples of real-life, production code.
I have no idea why that should be relevant
 
@райтфолд needs citation
 
2 mins ago, by райтфолд
hello dog this is human
Also, why the fuck does man turn off shiny bold and underlined text when piped through cat?
I just want no pager. Is there no way to keep the original behaviour except without pager?
 
Hi, everybody! I have a question that is too simple and too stupid to create. I'll get too many down votes if I do. I have been looking and looking to no avail. Now that I've spent too much time on this I am hopeful one of you kind people will make me feel even more stupid by answering my dumb question.
 
@райтфолд Does you man not page on it's own accord? It's with ANSI support for me
 
8:57 PM
This isn't going to be pretty.
 
@Lucy Gosh. That was a lot of words for no question
 
Thank you, Google.
 
@Lucy You don't get downvotes if your question is simple or stupid, you get downvotes if your question is unclear, off topic or badly written.
 
@райтфолд cat always preserves them
 
@Lucy Do you have diamonds though?
 
8:57 PM
@sehe nice
@sehe it pages by default.
 
So... At least, already know to use less -SR. Prolly man has a formatting flag to force ANSI even on a pipe
 
@sehe, @EtiennedeMartel, @Jefffrey: LOL
 
Telling my terminal emulator to open a man page does preserve the formatting and does it without pager, though:
 
OK, here it goes
 
No, wait, no.
 
8:58 PM
@BartekBanachewicz RTA "very take much doge shit"
 
@райтфолд termcap, TERM env?
 
This isn't going to be pretty at all.
 
But I have no idea which command it invokes.
 
@Lucy Ask, if it's short. No walls of code
 
@райтфолд Don't use Mac, Apple is not very good at computers.
 
8:59 PM
% echo $TERM
xterm-256color
% termcap
zsh: command not found: termcap
 
I'm calling a method that takes a string for the filename
deviceConfig->ReadFile("DeviceConfig.ini");
 
@райтфолд termcap goes into google
@Lucy ok. Use char const* because NUL chars are not supported. Next. (half joking here)
 

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