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11:44 AM
Hi all, how could I map this JSON?
{
    "a484075a-6920-4f13-ad18-203b64dc4f90": [
        {
            "price": 0.43,
            "createdAt": "2022-08-09T16:40:28.806Z",
            "regionid": "a484075a-6920-4f13-ad18-203b64dc4f90"
        },
        {
            "price": 0.63,
            "createdAt": "2022-08-15T16:40:28.806Z",
            "regionid": "a484075a-6920-4f13-ad18-203b64dc4f90"
        }
    ],
    "402608fd-81be-4fd6-8c70-70692d6267da": [
        {
            "price": 0.5,
            "createdAt": "2022-08-09T16:40:28.806Z",
 
11:56 AM
traverse through it?
what you have now is a JavaScript object. It is kinda a basic thing in JavaScript to work with it.
 
12:11 PM
what I used is .get("a484075a-6920-4f13-ad18-203b64dc4f90") ...so now I can loop the array...
 
How to open graphql playground page using apollo server express in 2022?
I am getting below error
The full landing page can not be loaded; it appears that you might be offline
 
12:30 PM
The maintainer of an open source repo I'm trying to PR just stated "!= null should not be used under any circumstance". I found this to be an interesting assertion. Any idea what the reasoning is behind this?
 
it's a stab in the dark. Why not asking that question to the reviewer?
using null is an anti-pattern for me, but people uses it anyways
 
I did. Awaiting response.
 
@mellis481 It's their opinion.
 
Wasn't sure if there was a fact behind it. A colleague presumed it was something espoused in a 20 year old book called "JavaScript: The Good Parts".
 
To me != null is acceptable. And it is the only acceptable use of non-strict inequality. Conversely, the only acceptable use of non-strict equality is == null
 
12:41 PM
I've always used it as a convenient way to check for !== null && !== undefined in a third as many characters
Sure the long way is more explicit, but I see no benefit in this case.
 
@mellis481 curious at the reply tho
 
I doubt there will be one, but you can follow the thread here: github.com/react-component/table/pull/856#discussion_r947878832
 
it happens that the responses are batshit that I just write "well ok, I fixed this important (security) problem. Feel free to update the code. Bye"
and move on
reminds me of a PR I worked on for multiple days. Huge commit, but reviewer struggled with variable & 1 somewhere. So I put it in a function isOdd(variable) and after that the PR kept open for ages, despite requesting for update.
 
12:59 PM
How to open graphql playground page using apollo server express in 2022?
I am getting below error
The full landing page can not be loaded; it appears that you might be offline
 
1:50 PM
Are you offline?
 
2:26 PM
Good morning, peeps.
I'm having an issue with Angular, npm, and my command line.
I ran
npm install -g @angular/cli
to install Angular on my system.
But when I type the command:

ng --version

I get an error that says:
bash: ng: command not found

I think I must be making some simple mistake. It has been a while since I have used Angular.
 
either it's not called ng, or something's off with your path
i'm not familiar with angular/cli, but this kind of problem wouldn't be unique to angular/cli
 
I don't think so.
 
@mellis481 most likely they hold a preference that the only acceptable approach is using strict equality. They are the maintainer, after all, so they are calling the shots. As for the rationale, I have to note that, as per ECMA spec, strict equality does not perform unnecessary coercion steps while the equality check does a bunch of extra checks. That said, ofc, the performance difference is so negligible, it's only worth considering as a theoretical basis behind the choice.
In addition, strict equality is used by many unconditionally for consistency's sake given that normally, there is little benefit to using simple equality that bears a risk of sneaking in bugs during data type coercion
 
well, also, there's certain... rules that people often follow for no reason other than consistency.
 
Ah, I did another google search that tells me that I can get the path to where global packages are installed with

npm config get prefix
 
2:31 PM
If you know every instance of equality in your code base is strict, no coercion, you can feel a little bit safer in that things will return what you expect them to
 
yup, that's basically the whole reasoning if one approaches such rules mindfully and isn't just cargo-culting
 
2:56 PM
posted on August 18, 2022 by Ben Mason

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Dev 106 (106.0.5243.2) for Android. It's now available on Google Play. You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. Erhu Eakpobaro Google Chrome

 
 
1 hour later…
3:58 PM
@VivianRiver Have a look into npx, generally fixes a lot of these problems
 
4:21 PM
reminds me of the time when I unknowingly ended up with 2 npm versions at the same time
 
5:02 PM
posted on August 18, 2022 by Ben Mason

The Dev channel has been updated to 106.0.5245.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux. A partial list of changes is available in the Git log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues. Srinivas Sista Google Chrome

 
5:47 PM
Hi.
 
6:06 PM
Nornalizing with NFKC and NFKD result same why?
    let str1 = '\uFB00'
    let str2 = '\u0066\u0066'

    console.log(str1 + " (" + str1.length + ")");
    console.log(str2 + " (" + str2.length + ")");

    let str1_NFKC = str1.normalize('NFKC');
    let str2_NFKC = str2.normalize('NFKC');

    console.log(str1_NFKC + " (" + str1_NFKC.length + ")");
    console.log(str2_NFKC + " (" + str2_NFKC.length + ")");

    let str1_NFKD = str1.normalize('NFKD');
    let str2_NFKD = str2.normalize('NFKD');

    console.log(str1_NFKD + " (" + str1_NFKD.length + ")");
 
posted on August 18, 2022 by Srinivas Sista

 The dev channel has been updated to 106.0.5245.0 for Windows, Mac & Linux. A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues. Srinivas Sista Google Chrome  

 

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