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2:12 AM
Here are some splines I'm algorithmically plotting pixel-by-pixel.
Question here is: are splines approximated in graphics, because the ones I keep ending up with always look fuzzy & rough, rather than interpolated & smooth 🤔
 
 
2 hours later…
3:50 AM
@Lapys Magnifying a bit, they don't just look rough, they are pretty rough.
 
That's the raw output from the sampling 'm doing 😔
 
That's the one with a degree of 4, gets very much less accurate the more degrees are added
Any idea on how to smooth it out? (algorithmically, or otherwise)
 
I'd probably do a lot fewer samples, and just draw straight lines between them. You don't really need a huge number of straight lines to do a decent approximation of a curve.
I'm still a little puzzled how you're doing things that's producing that poor of results to start with though.
 
@JerryCoffin *sigh Alright. But I must warn you, it's very barebones (really just me fumbling about trying to intuit things)
Check the `WM_PAINT` routine (line 390) and the `drawSpline(…)` function (line 156)
https://github.com/LapysDev/Experiments/blob/master/C%2B%2B/Graphics/Windows%20API/geometry.cpp
The number of samples done were essentially the "length" of the longest control line in the spline
By reducing the number of samples (`maximumLength`) to `50`, I get something like this.
Guessing I should work off of sample sizes this small? 😕
All of a sudden I feel like a dum dum 😅
(the GitHub code's been updated)
 
4:43 AM
Seems to get more rough with additional sample points :p
Thanks, @JerryCoffin
 
 
1 hour later…
5:49 AM
@Lapys Sorry, got distracted. Glad it helped.
 
 
3 hours later…
8:38 AM
A question about the C++ definitive list and guide. (https://stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/the-definitive-c-book-guide-and-list)
I think that Introduction to Programming with C++ for Engineers (http://home.agh.edu.pl/~cyganek/BookCpp.html), could be added to the introductory list, in addition to C++ Primer and Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++. It is similar to PPP in spirit - focuses less on being a "language lawyer" and more on writing programs using the language, while introducing the necessary parts of the language. It uses/teaches modern c++ most of time, and shows so
Sorry if this is not the write place to post - but the stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… required to discuss the suggestions here first.
 
nwp
@TelKitty Those are not alike at all. We measure gravitational waves with laser beams, so what we get is a recorded wave that looks like this. Playing that as sound is straightforward, unlike turning manure into gold.
 
 
3 hours later…
12:00 PM
Any of your 'experts' would enlighten me how to turn a laser wave into a sound wave??!
No, I don't think so ...
 
nwp
You just do. I don't know which part you think is difficult.
 
How?
 
nwp
You know what a sin wave looks like, right?
Now imagine someone dangling a laser pointer. over time it draws something like a sin wave.
Then you put the values into a .wav file and give that file to VLC or whatever.
Voila, you turned a laser wave into a sound wave.
 
...
 
nwp
You probably won't be able to hear that since it will be in the single hertz range, but the gravitational waves are of suitable frequency to make them audible.
 
12:04 PM
I could draw a chair in my computer using the image of a chair, the thing in computer is not a real chair.
It is a computer presentation of a chair.
 
nwp
I don't get your point. The gravitational waves are real and the sound waves are real. Computers helped computing, that's what they are for, but the end result are physically existing things.
 
Laser could burn a hole on your skin, sound could too? Visible light is 4 - 7.5*10^14 (10 to the power of 14, i.e. 100000000000000) hertz, human hearing spectrum is 20Hz to 20000Hz (extreme case). Laser (light) has wave and particular dual quality, sound does too??!
 
nwp
You're severely misunderstanding the light part. It's just the information carrier. Forget the laser part, use a seismograph instead. It's just a pen on a piece of paper that is moving. Normally that makes a line, but during an earthquake the pen starts shaking and draws a wave, Which you could then play as audio.
 
12:25 PM
Look, I could build a bridge using chocolate too:
It looks awfully like a bridge, but no, it's not a bridge.
Because it lacks the intrinsically value that a normal bridge serves!
 
nwp
Again, I don't know what you're talking about. Those sound waves don't just sound like sound, they are sound and have all intrinsic values that sound is supposed to have.
 
Yes, a sound wave would have all intrinsic value a sound wave should have, but it does not have all the intrinsic value a light wave have, or gravitation wave should have for that matter.
 
nwp
There is no light wave. And of course it doesn't have all intrinsic values that a gravitational wave has because then it would be impossible to perceive by humans. That's why we turned it into a sound wave in the first place.
 
1:14 PM
Wait why the fuck is google saying me that 1GB=1000mb that's weird
Curious ,wasn't 1gb 1024mb
 
1GB = 1000MB
b = bit, B = byte
But 1 GB could be 1024MB, it depends ...
 
1GB is actually 1014MB, 1000 is an approximate to make calculations easy
 
But days ago it used to show 1GB=1024 mb
 
Yeah it did
 
Everything fucking changed 1mb=1000kb that's weird now don't say 1byte isn't 8bits
Yeah indeed lol
 
1:19 PM
Maybe 2 ^ 10 = 1024, it's all for convenience ...
 
@Agent_A you got me
 
But this small difference of 24mb might bring a lot of difference
@WalidSiddik yeah
I was about to root my phone and get some swap memory for my Android then checked this for confirmation
 
@TelKitty 1GiB = 1024MiB
 
what is MiB
or just a typo
 
The byte is a unit of digital information that most commonly consists of eight bits. Historically, the byte was the number of bits used to encode a single character of text in a computer and for this reason it is the smallest addressable unit of memory in many computer architectures. To disambiguate arbitrarily sized bytes from the common 8-bit definition, network protocol documents such as The Internet Protocol (RFC 791) refer to an 8-bit byte as an octet. Those bits in an octet are usually counted with numbering from 0 to 7 or 7 to 0 depending on the bit endianness. The first bit is number 0...
not a typo
it's the resolution of an argument between storage makers who are cheap, and OS writers who are lazy
 

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