« first day (3454 days earlier)      last day (66 days later) » 

1:22 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
2:27 AM
@ABuckau I have chicken wire. They will go on the outside.
They should really go under the ground too because foxes can dig.
 
3:21 AM
Why do I think Australian government is treating its people like caged chickens - it releases arbitrary regulations at random, maybe to see how obedient people are. Some of them are to insure the slowing down to the spread of Covid-19, sure, I respect that. Others are just made on a wimp without too much thoughts or reasoning.
I distrust governments as day go by.
It's a LEARNED distrust.
 
3:43 AM
I am not sure new Australian regulation is a violation of human rights, when the new regulation says that they can jail you for 6 months if you go outside without a valid reason.
So a single mother can not go to shopping centre with her 2 children because it's a public gathering of more than 2 people, a person can not visit his/her old grandparents and help them to mow the lawn. You can not travel between your properties even one of them is for agriculture - plants and animals need routine care.
Australian death rate: 1 in 1 million people.
 
4:01 AM
I have not met up with friends or go to cafe/restaurants for more than a month and I have not gone to any public gathering. But this is no longer about 'flatten the curve', not there is any solid proof that flatting the curve is the best solution. This is about control when the people in control has no experience or proven intelligence in this issue.
The history of economical thoughts has taught me that super herds led by the 'elite' still could not be perfect. But this time, it's not about perfection, it's about not drive the whole country off a cliff because certain people in the government have wimps.
 
 
7 hours later…
nwp
Hopefully it stays that way.
 
@nwp well unless you're in Spain... which has been insane
 
nwp
That is pretty insane. Also apparently Hungary abolished democracy.
 
They were going to anyway
 
12:48 PM
Mornang
 
 
1 hour later…
2:13 PM
Well yeah, so now StackOverflow has a dark mode!
Apparently chat.stackoverflow.com isn't on a different codebase
 
April fools day joke I suppose :x
Stackoverflow was founded by troll wannabes. Of course April 1st is Stackoverflow's favourite day of the year.
Not everyone can be a 1337 troll, but that's just life.
 
 
6 hours later…
8:26 PM
SO's dark mode is horribly ugly.
 
@traducerad Horribly ugly might be an exaggeration. Then again, it probably isn't. I tried it for a bit, and gave up because it was too close to unreadable.
 
I just realised I said it is good looking lol
not what I meant. I meant "very ugly"
@JerryCoffin another downside, indeed
 
And they even have a whole blog entry dedicated to "how to get it wrong", I guess. stackoverflow.blog/2020/03/31/…
 
I am sorry, but this is really ugly
@JerryCoffin I hope not too many people base their design on this
 
I guess being fair, they do seem to realize it's not very good the way it is. meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/395949/…
 
8:36 PM
@JerryCoffin welcome to stackoverflow, where (semi-) competent people are extremely arrogant, spit on devs who make mistakes and all other sort of peasants. As a SO user your critique should always be harsh and as sharp as a knife.
this is not real life, where people are protected by social conventions. Here, the harsh truth kills.
Joking obviously. But this is to some extent how things go on SO, IMO
 
8:57 PM
More like "we're not here to help you, we're here to write an encyclopedia"
 
@Mikhail encyclopedia? How so?
I feel like quite some companies mix app dev and lib/framework dev. I all the time hear folks saying everything should be as modular and reusable as possible. But that directive imo is totally incorrect when writing an application. It is the building blocks it is using that you want to optimize for modularity and so on. Otherwise you are fighting the wrong battle.
@Mikhail I think Puppy was/is a good example of this. He was/is extremely competent, but it looks like helping others feels to him like cutting his own eye with a knife
but I am not sure whether he wanted to write an encyclopedia
 
9:29 PM
@traducerad Yeah, we're seeing a growing backlash against investing in generalization code. Part of the underlying reason is that such code often doesn't have a business case for many reasons, although personally, I often feel its pretty hard to get the abstraction "right" on the first product iteration so that writing generalized code can be technically too difficult.
@JerryCoffin Hows the quarantine treating ya?
 
yep, absolutely
 
@Mikhail Whole family's getting fed up with being in the house too much. Other than that, I have no room to complain. Still employed, saving on gas, saving close to an hour a day of commuting, ...
@Mikhail The other problem that constantly arises is we generalize the wrong things, so not only does our generalization do little or no good, but in a lot of cases actively gets in the way when a change really is needed.
 
Yeah, on a similar note, I'm increasingly believing that the advise "write general code" is among the worst because you can't find anybody that can actually do it. Instead you're stuck with a ton of code.
I ran into a interesting life cycle mistake for a plugin system from an OEM. They basically implemented a small C like scripting language. They have commands to do external function calls from dlls. The problem is that each script loads and unloads the entire dll. This is bad if you're dll performs a long initialization sequence. The correct thing is to keep the dll in memory, or have a special "load on startup" feature.
because of this I will need to write a painful IPC server
 
In order to write general code you need a very strategical approach: you need to precisely know what your product looks like now and what it is supposed to look like now and also what it is supposed to look like in the next 5+ years. Thqt way you know what aspects will become generic.

Buuut then 1-2 years later comes a new customer with a very new unexpected request which is totally orthogonal to what was considered as being generic. But he pays big bucks and the sales dept said we can perfectly do what he asks. And from there it goes downhill...
 
@Mikhail Stupid thing is that if they'd just done the simple and obvious thing (call LoadLibrary, probably call GetProcAddress a few times), the system would have handled keeping the library around, and eventually unloading it if there was no longer any reference to it.
Simpler still, if they'd just included it in the link (possibly with the loadoncall flag), it'd almost all work reasonably well automatically.
 
9:45 PM
#import("YourDLL.dll");
#import int YourDLL_DoSomething(int64 init_settings);
int main() {
   YourDLL_DoSomething();
   return TRUE;
}
So in this example, the dll is loaded on each macro call, but also if you don't include the #import you can't actually use the functions from the dll. So, even if it persists you need to keep #import-ing it. So unless #import calls are "cached" the language actually doesn't let you call other functions without loading dlls multiple times.
@traducerad This story is screwed up because if the code were actually generic they'd be able to handle the massive changes because, by definition, their code was generic. A more likely situation was that the developers and management thought they were writing generic code, but really, when "push came to shove" it ended up they didn't have generic code, and the lead developer fled to some higher paying job (which he got after writing cool generic code).
 
@Mikhail having code which is 100% generic in all possible ways/cases is not possible I think
Haven't seen that yet
 
Here is a common situation, developer convinces management to give them more time to make some portion of the code generic. When people need to use that portion it ends up not being generic. As I grow older I find it almost impossible to believe anybody when they say their code is generic, unless its being used in multiple bases, etc. This trial by fire approach means its not worth writing generic code from the start.
 
Oh, I see
 
10:12 PM
@Mikhail I agree.
Write code that is concrete. This means write code that does what it has to do. And don't hide it behind some kind of foggy abstraction.
I've seen a lot of "fake abstractions" in our codebase at work.
 
@Mikhail Likewise, code isn't portable until it's actually been tested and used on at least three platforms.
 
@JerryCoffin Yeah, it's one of those "rule of three"s.
Like the rule of 3 of code duplication.
 
@StackedCrooked Likewise (and most of our code at work isn't terribly old either).
 
I wonder if the underlying reason is the need to distribute parts of the code to different team members
Like I've never worked in an environment with more than 4 simultaneous contributors and even at four we had a few times when I had to tell people to stop coding on my turf
 
@Mikhail We certainly have more than 4 in our codebase at work. We do plan sprints pretty carefully to assure people won't get in each other's way though.
 
10:32 PM
@Mikhail Try to introduce the concept of "code ownership". It's natural that any codebase can be divided into parts developed by different individuals. The developer of a "part" (or "subproject") is naturally the "owner" of that code. This implies that if people modify your code, they need pass your review before they can commit.
 
Yeah, somehow the ownership conflict was rather minor, the real issue was that certain parts of the backend I felts only I could do because only I knew how they were supposed to be written :-)
Not to mention that I should have been doing more optics/product development and less routine coding.
 
@Mikhail Seriously? "The sea god Poseidon is presented here as a disgruntled manager of the waters, which he does not really know." Do you think of yourself as someone micromanaging the code without understanding what the code is for?
 
Ah, not that part. More like Poseidon insisted on doing everything himself and was thus overworked.
 
Ok. I feel relieved now :)
@Mikhail Maybe they are just waiting for you to take on the role of a leader.
 
10:51 PM
I was the leader so the conflict was minor :-)
 
Wait, what was the problem again? :)
 
I was wondering if the big reason people write generic code (certainly modular) is that despite being a poor use of time it enables teams to grow larger.
So the productivity per developer drops but you can more developers.
 
I don't think that works well.
If you mean "generic code" as in "library code", then that's a really hard goal to achieve. Writing a good library is like a lifetime achievement.
Anyway. I should sleep soon :)
 

« first day (3454 days earlier)      last day (66 days later) »