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12:04 AM
@DanielJour nice catch.
 
12:33 AM
@CaptainGiraffe I'd cheat and sort only half of them, since I'd be pretty sure you were never going to read through 2 megabytes of them to verify the result. :-)
 
1:23 AM
@CaptainGiraffe I think my min heap can beat your radix sort
I bite my thumb at you sir
 
@Rick Maybe--but I wouldn't bet a lot on it. A heapsort is usually about half the speed of a quicksort.
 
testing it as we speak
 
 
6 hours later…
7:15 AM
@thecoshman That would have been my guess as well.
 
 
2 hours later…
9:14 AM
@fredoverflow I'm not sure why though exactly... wouldn't if you have object foo<E> wouldn't foo<Int> result in a distinct type at compile time compared to foo<String>. I know that the runtime generics data is lost, but as Kotlin compiles these usages of foo, isn't it internally making a normal object with a name, so at run time you would have two clearly different objects to be used
 
 
3 hours later…
11:53 AM
If you love pets but don't have them, make friends with those who have cute pets :p
 
12:29 PM
@thecoshman I guess object compiles to a class with one static member, not an infinite number of members for all imaginable types ;)
 
12:47 PM
 
 
2 hours later…
2:21 PM
Conan holds true to its name: I feel like a barbarian hacking recipes together
 
@Morwenn Isnt that what we all are
Code is just a recipe for data after all :P
 
data is just a reified support for code
 
3:25 PM
I wonder whether there is any data analysis done on what combination of code are most likely to carry logic errors.
 
4:03 PM
@TelKitty Quite a lot of it--but all of it that I've seen was pretty close to worthless.
 
4:34 PM
^ Mysticial maybe you should take the hint :)
 
@StackedCrooked Yes, I'm sure he honestly believes there's a real use for trillions of digits....
 
Ah. Ok then.
 
@StackedCrooked Me, I honestly am convinced that there's a real use for computing (to the unit) the number of "strings" we could fit in the universe if it were a single, solid object of maximum density.
 
5:36 PM
ITT everyone's insane
 
6:16 PM
@ScarletAmaranth Not restricted to this thread. A requirement for entry to the Lounge. Or maybe a result of entering the Lounge.
 
7:05 PM
will to_string(char2int(c)) work for both Alpha and numeric chars
 
7:18 PM
forget it, I found something better static_cast<int>
 
 
2 hours later…
8:51 PM
@JerryCoffin This is a very viable strat until you get to the top 2 =)
@Rick First of all, you should probably make it a max heap.
 
@CaptainGiraffe my radix is not sorting 64 longs correctly but it sorts ints just fine
I am using stable_partition and shifting bits to the left by 1
then check the difference
@CaptainGiraffe does it really matter if its a max or a min. But my min/max heap works just fine. But I can't compare the two approaches just until I get that up and working. so to be continued...
 
10:06 PM
@Rick Yes, it makes a difference, and he's right: you normally want a max heap.
 
10:20 PM
@JerryCoffin I see how why a higher priority might be important for say transactions. However, why would that be the case here?
 
11:10 PM
@Rick A heap sort starts by building a heap from the previously-unsorted items. Then you grab the root from the heap, and swapping it with the last item in the heap. Then you have a one-smaller heap with a root that needs to be sifted back in correctly. Since it's getting moved to the end of the memory formerly occupied by the heap, if you do a max-heap, each time you swap one to the end, you're getting the largest one in the heap. Writing them at decreasing addresses ends up sorted.
If you used a min-heap, you'd end up with them sorted in decreasing order.
 
@Rick What Jerry said + the clarification you reuse your memory/vector while popping elements.
@Rick If you are using stable_partition you're not really radixing in your herd.
Jerry said I'm right. That gives me a warm fuzz =)
 
@CaptainGiraffe I am passing it arguments. return !(a &(1<<bit));
where a is the long and the bit <31
 
@Rick how do you do radix sort?
 
@CaptainGiraffe You use stable partition in a radix sort if you start from the least significant digit, and work your way toward the most significant digit.
 
@CaptainGiraffe booyakasha what Jerry said :P
 
11:21 PM
@JerryCoffin Stable partition uses comparisons yes?
@JerryCoffin I find that LSB radix sort is easiest to make efficient, reusing lists and so.
 
seems more efficent not to reuse lists
but I could be wrong.
 
@Rick Well the LISP guys would certainly consider this fighting words.
 
clearing the nums array each time and concating the first and second buckets seems...
 
@Rick Nah, reuse them with contents. Just keep track of your contents.
 
ya but then you would be using way more memory.
 

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