« first day (2140 days earlier)   

12:00 PM
And I get that fixed how? MainController CTOR?
 
Yes, take an IDataContext in the constructor
and assign it to that member
 
Okay.
Considering I was told earlier to get rid of the CTOR, thats why I didnt have it there.
But it is now.
Which, crashes it immediately.
 
who said that?
 
1 hour ago, by War
@Xariez remove that ctor move the classes, clean up the naming and rejig that query
 
@War wtf
OK, did you do what I said earlier to do with wiring up the dependency injection?
 
12:06 PM
I havent looked much up about it, but since I were rather direcetly told that interfaces are good to have, I've got that if it has anything to do with each other.
 
C4u
C# 7.0 isnt available without the new visual studio preview 4.
And the preview 4 is only available for the enterprise users.
Sucks.
 
@Xariez you don't need interfaces to do DI but it makes it so much more useful. It's not magic though, you have to tell the application what to do. The framework has to know how to get an instance of IDataContext to pass to the controller's constructor
 
Fair enough
But you got as good as my current situation on that gist except for the CTOR being added to the controller, so besides that im rather lost even although I feel like whatever fault I got lying behind isnt that "huge" of a error. Might be the complete opposite.
 
What?
That sentence just looks like a random jumble of words to me
 
You got my current situation in the gist that I pasted, the link. aka. gist.github.com/JohannesSundqvist/…
And, I've added the CTOR which you told me to do.
But since its still broken, theres something missing (obviously), and even although I got a slight idea of what I am doing, its nothing that I could come up with now that looks obviously wrong.
 
12:13 PM
OK, follow that the article I linked earlier says about configuring dependency injection
 
Looking at it right now
services.AddTransient<IDateTime, SystemDateTime>(); - This little line
 
OR to check that it's working you can just make the constructor parameterless and create a DataContext yourself in the controller, it's a little hacky but it proves that what you have is working
 
I get what IDateTime is, but whats SystemDateTime? What should it be changed to, that is?
 
no not actually that
it's an example
 
That I know, but if you follow what i linked earlier you'll see what my interface looks like, so I am guessing that IDateTime shoudl be changed to IDataContext, but what about the latter?
 
12:17 PM
DataContext
 
Right.
That it did not like apparently
 
Please be more specific
 
This is as specific as it gets
The type 'CustomerManager.Models.DataContext' cannot be used as type parameter 'TImplementation' in the generic type or method 'ServiceCollectionServiceExtensions.AddTransient<TService, TImplementation>(IServiceCollection)'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'CustomerManager.Models.DataContext' to 'CustomerManager.Interfaces.IDataContext'.
 
pretty self-explanatory, that
 
The error message? Yes
The fix? Not so obvious to me anyways
 
12:20 PM
Implement the interface
DataContext is not an IDataContext
 
Well
So that means that this part needs to go in a file where the queries (DataContext) is not?
public DataContext(DbContextOptions<DataContext> options)
: base(options)
{
}
 
what?
no, it's nothing to do with the constructor
 
DataContext : DbContext is required for that part to work, but the Startup.cs part doesn't work on the other hand if I do it that way
 
None of this is anything to do with implementing the interface
Google "implement interface C#"
 
I got the interface, and I always have
 
12:25 PM
But it has nothing to do with your DataContext class
 
But since I got services.AddTransient<IDataContext, DataContext>(); , the DataContext class needs to look like public class DataContext : IDataContext {} or else I get the error message I just posted in chat.
 
yes!
exactly!
Implementing the interface, like I told you
 
But after I changed it to that, the constructor breaks, because it is expecting it to look like DataContext : DbContext {}
 
No
 
War
@scheien is that minecraft 2 or osmething
 
12:27 PM
The type 'CustomerManager.Models.DataContext' cannot be used as type parameter 'TContext' in the generic type or method 'DbContextOptions<TContext>'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'CustomerManager.Models.DataContext' to 'Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbContext'.
Theres the exact message
 
Nobody said you had to remove the inheritance of DbContext
 
War
@Xariez gimme a sec to get up to speed again ... i've been working (like anyone believes that in here)
 
I think you need to read some more about C# and how to use the language
 
Oh fuck. SOrry about that.
Did NOT think that you can have multiple ones
But I'll still need to ask actually, SHOULD the DBContextOptions and queries be in the same class or in seperate?
Wether it works or not?
 
War
public User GetUser(int id)
{
    return Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.Id == id);
}
try something like that @Xariez
 
12:30 PM
I don't recognise DbContextOptions, but it can't really be anywhere else, it's an argument to a DbContext
 
War
also ... you still don't need that ctor
 
@War god man don't confuse him any more, it's been a struggle just to undo whatever you told him earlier
 
Right @TomW
 
War
public class DataContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
    }
how is that complex ?
oh is he trying to figure out the DI side ?
 
Not that changing that did too much of a difference as far as immediate-errors go
 
War
12:33 PM
DataContext is a concrete type that is self bindable ... or you can add the interface to it to create a rule for binding this to the interface
 
Putting queries in the context, eh, it's ok as designs go. For just getting it working it's not important
 
War
public class DataContext : DbContext, IDataContext
    {
        public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
    }
 
Thats what i got atm
plus the query that you just gave me as well - as good as
 
War
ok so then you need a rule in your DI container
 
Which I have said several times
 
War
12:34 PM
services.AddTransient<IDataContext, DataContext>(); ... it seems you already have
 
And linked to an article that explains how to do it
 
I do
 
War
@TomW sorry man ... im catching up
ok so whats the current problem @Xariez ?
 
InvalidOperationException: Unable to resolve service for type 'Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbContextOptions`1[CustomerManager.Models.DataCon‌​text]' while attempting to activate 'CustomerManager.Models.DataContext'. - to be specific, on the other hand however I will have to leave for now, might hop into here later but yeah
 
War
so it knows the type but can't resolve it
seems odd
 
12:41 PM
You can lead a noob to documentation but you can't make him read...
 
War
ah is that the current problem?
 
Explains exactly how to DI an EF Core datacontext
linked it once already
referenced it again in the recent conversation
 
War
dam that makes that harder than how I do it
I use ninject though ... is this for the built in DI stuff
jeez thats a ton of work by comparison lol
 
err what?
It's one line
 
War
overriding onconfiguring
building an options object to construct the context
 
12:45 PM
whaat
 
War
factory patterns
 
no, I linked to the specific section that is relevant
services.AddDbContext<BloggingContext>(options => options.UseSqlite("Filename=./blog.db"));
obviously not sqlite in this case
 
War
but why?
 
why what?
 
War
12:46 PM
LMAO
services.AddDbContext<BloggingContext>(options => options.UseSqlite("Filename=./blog.db"));
seems overkill
concrete types are self bindable
no rule needed
serviceProvider.GetService<BloggingContext>(); <-- all the code needed
maybe microsoft did some weird stuff with it
or maybe ninject does some magic I just don't know about lol
lol i did not know you can await stuff that aint async / a task
funny but feels ultimately pointless
 
await TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15);
0.o
 
War
exactly ROFL
 
@RoelvanUden Its almost sad how true this is ^^
 
War
I was like ... ehmmm .... WHUT ?
 
await from url in urls select DownloadAsync(url);
No.
 
War
12:57 PM
LMAO
 
What the language needs is MORE THINGS
 
War
@TomW ALL the things!!!
I still don't get the reasoning behind adding tuples
are they basically not just dynamic objects?
 
@TomW oh no. ohh nooooo. please make it go away. trump can be president, just make it go awayyyyyyy
 
How about an AOP step that implements GetAwaiter for everything
 
War
@KendallFrey its almost like they want to piss everyone off
 
1:01 PM
 
So it's not visible in your codebase, but you can await every fucking thing and some 'genius' programmer writes unnecessary await code everywhere
 
seeing 2000 line method in legacy code
 
you know, that article reminds me of Haskell
where you can implement anything on any type
even built-in ones
 
@QuietNaN how about 8k + :P
 
@Proxy is it a whole project in one method? :)))
 
Amy
1:04 PM
but can haskell forge new relationships where none previously existed? that's what i want most out of a language.
 
War
@QuietNaN @Proxy meh ... lt me know when you hit 20k lines
 
@Amy oh you're gonna love Haskell
 
@QuietNaN sadly but nope, there are more then few functions with over 1k lines
 
War
the dev in question thought that was the very definition of procedural programming
 
manager wants to talk about very old project :)))
 
War
1:06 PM
rofl
 
hahah
 
that is an amazingly creepy gif
 
coding in vba
 
War
feels like it came out of a horror movie
 
rofl
bug reporting in my company
 
War
1:11 PM
@QuietNaN dude I'm so jealous .... you have monkeys!!! such an upgrade
 
monkeys rule the world
 
Monkeys!
 
when designing a multitenancy saas api ... would you guys provide all api calls and let the devs use it how they like - even if it means they could do harm if used wrong - OR - build the calls in a way that he can't really destroy anything (scoped)?

examples:
a) the dev could patch user X at any time via PATCH /user/:id
b) he has to first authenticate as a user and can only make calls specific to that user (so he can't touch user X)
 
I look at it like this:
- someone will always try to break it on purpose
 
build the calls in a way that he can't really destroy anything (scoped)
 
1:14 PM
@codepushr Scoped.
 
Authenticate, Authorize
 
Permission filters to the rescue.
 
You really have to code to defend against that person never mind any accidental but destructive use, which means scoped
Suppose two businesses in direct competition are both customers?
 
War
@codepushr option b
 
i mean, he would only destroy stuff in his own data anyway - all our clients will have their data separated (multitenancy) ...
 
1:15 PM
How happy would they be to learn that you let their competitor trash their data?
 
@TomW If it has 24TB, it matches my setup.
^ A little late.
 
War
@codepushr I tend to give people ultimate freedom within their permission scope ... so if they fuck up they only fuck up what they have access too not the whole system
 
@War that's my point
 
War
users do dumb shit
bu there's only so far you can go
 
i was asking my question not in general but under the premise that they already are scroped - like inside their scope - should i there guide them with my calls or give them complete freedom
 
War
1:17 PM
It's like my boss says adding the rule that users must reset their passwords once ever 30 days to anything makes it less secure on the basis that users are stupid will just write their ever changing passwords down
 
i'm new to this, i'm having a hard time explaining, sorry :D
 
War
my thinking is that the system is not less secure ... in fact it's more secure
can't defensively code a user
 
@codepushr Guide them. I presume you have an administrator permission that can basically fuck up a whole lot? Design your APIs around such power users so that chances are less that a fuckup occurs.
 

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