« first day (1369 days earlier)   

1:24 AM
@Owatch No, they've had more people applying to go than they've had openings for the last 4 or 5 years at least, and it gets worse every year. The past 2 or 3 years they've held a lottery. I am not one of the chosen. :(
@Owatch No, the tickets are not transferrable. Sometimes they'll let you transfer a ticket within the same company. I guess I could mug my partner and take his slot...
 
2:00 AM
@owatch you still come here?
You can all thank @enricosusatyo for me coming back
 
2:39 AM
Your welcome
 
 
3 hours later…
nil
5:11 AM
@EnricoSusatyo Behold:
in Android, yesterday, by nil
http://stupid.af ← Hey guys! I bought a new domain name for comedy purposes!
 
5:49 AM
@nil ....... You've done it.
10/10 best domain ever
You gonna be rich
WAIT IT REDIRECTS TO PHP?! LOLOLOLOLOOL
 
nil
6:19 AM
@EnricoSusatyo That is the true beauty of it.
 
LOLOLOLOLOL
 
6:56 AM
@Maximilian Of course I still come
here.
 
nil
Mhmm
 
8:00 AM
Afternoon Fellas!
Any idea, what to do when presenting Alerts for versions before and after iOS 8?
I mean, the code before was to simply show an instance of UIAlertView..... but after iOS 8, is presented instead, as UIAlertController.
Now we're supporting an app for iOS 7, 8, 9... so...
 
 
3 hours later…
11:15 AM
@PushpinderN. You have a couple of choices. You can write code that checks (at runtime) to see if UIAlertController is available, and if it is, use that, otherwise fall back to UIAlertView. That's the most compliant approach, but also the most work. Another, simpler approach is to just ignore UIAlertController and always use UIAlertView
Is it really worth the trouble to support iOS 7? The numbers get really small on iOS when you go back 2 major versions. (less than 10%)
 
 
2 hours later…
1:32 PM
Thanks @DuncanC. And no, not exactly worth the trouble these days.
 
 
4 hours later…
5:19 PM
@pushpinderN. Write a custom alert class which uses UIAlertView for iOS 7 and before, and uses UIAlertController for iOS 8+
 
 
3 hours later…
8:46 PM
Checking for multiple variables in a tree.
If a branch is a number, or null, I returned (variable_pointer != NULL)
If a branch is a variable, return true if variable_pointer is NULL, and assign the variable to it.
else, if the variable_pointer is not NULL, return false if the variables do not match.
Then recursively call the function on each branch, and return the &&.
Except if a variable is encountered after a number in a branch, the number will return false (No variable assigned yet), and then the variable will be assigned and returned true. False and true is false, so it breaks.
But if I always return true upon encountering NULL or number, I essentially say that a tree of a single node (being a number, or Null) has a variable. Which it does not.
Its a paradox.
 

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