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nil
12:11 AM
Ruby currently beats Python in performance, libraries, package management, and flexibility.
The only things Python has going for it are indentation-based scope (nevermind that actual scope rules in Python are completely fucked) and generators (i.e., lazy enumeration of collections)
I need my brain to be less fried today.
 
o/ Good morning guys
 
nobody uses these 2 languages for performance…
speaking about else, I think it depends
 
nil
You'd be surprised.
After all, saying "nobody" means you're automatically incorrect there.
 
yes, this is just shorthand.
if one needs speed, and dynamic typing™, there's Clojure
 
nil
Clojure's a piece of crap tied to the JVM. It's a waste of time.
 
12:21 AM
Ruby is tied to Ruby VM as well then
 
nil
Granted that's just kind of the case for most Lisps
Ruby's not actually tied to the MRI VM.
There's Rubinius, which does JIT compilation; RubyMotion, which does static compilation; MRI/YARV, the reference implementation of Ruby; JRuby, the JVM implementation; etc.
 
MRI VM or JRuby (JVM) or …
or there's also compiler to machine code?
oh, OK
 
nil
Oh, and mruby, the Ruby implementation intended for embedding and mobile systems.
Also MacRuby, but it's deprecated.
 
looks like it got very cool
 
nil
Rubinius and RubyMotion are good for performance, JRuby is semi-good but obviously has you stuck in JVM land and therefore cut off from anything useful. MRI currently beats Python 3, which says nothing good about Python 3 (nevermind that nobody is adopting Python 3 while everyone hopped on board with Ruby 2.x). mruby is off doing its own thing and I haven't gotten around to doing anything with it.
Also, RubyMotion compiles native executables for Mac OS, iOS, and Android (via JNI).
Wouldn't be surprised if there's also a .NET implementation of Ruby I'm ignoring because I generally ignore .NET.
There's also Mirah, which is kind of like a Ruby→JVM bytecode compiler sans stdlib and a few tweaks to make it more JVM-friendly.
Oh, and then there's Opal, which compiles Ruby to Javascript.
 
12:27 AM
sounds sort of wasteful, because a language is not suitable for big projects anyway as long as it has no decent static&strong type system
 
nil
Depends on how well you break things up and how clear it is what your code is doing.
 
and people spent many resources on Ruby :D
 
nil
That said, node.js exists and I keep trying to tell people how god damn stupid that is.
 
of course, but type system makes everything a lot easier
why should I bother thinking about types in my head when compiler can do it for me?
 
nil
You're going to be thinking about them anyway, the difference is whether you annotated all your things with types.
 
12:29 AM
well, not all types must be explicitly annotated
unless you are talking about Java
 
nil
Java can die in a fire.
 
thinking — yes, but not constantly checking them
and some complex types are not very easy even to spell or type
but easy for compiler
 
nil
The other thing is that, in the case of RubyMotion, it is doing some type checking since it's being statically compiled.
 
that must be cool in theory :)
 
nil
Your source code doesn't need types to handle types. The thing you're being in favor of here is static compilation and analysis.
i.e., you want a compiler.
Now if you're arguing in favor of static typing, that makes more sense, because that's an aid to the programmer. The compiler could determine this crap all on its own.
 
12:35 AM
yep, I'm talking specifically about static typing, which doesn't imply that types must be specified explicitly
 
nil
Yes, it does.
Otherwise you're talking about sometimes-static-sometimes-duck
Type systems are annoying in how many terms they have
Scala's possibly being the most offensive to me now
At any rate, need to eat.
 
in theory, I don't care about compiler, as long as there's clever type checking (which also allows IDEs to provide other help to me, lazy human) and nothing that inevitably limits performance in the end…
so I don't necessarily want a compiler
@nil I mean, they don't always need to be annotated
in Scala, not all terms are unique, some are just sort of a "syntactic sugar"
but it's complicated as hell :/
anyway, it's not necessary to abuse the language to create cryptic code
from practical point of view, Scala allows to do some nice things
it's sort of new C++ (haha, of course not)
 

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