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7:09 PM
@NikiC Just wanna throw an idea off you: Could we add an is_null() macro to Zend? It's not as crazy as it seems.
the problem is stuff like if (UNEXPECTED((a = b(Z_STR_P(c))) == NULL)) {
there's so many brackets it's easy to slip up and make it assign the comparison to a, rather than the function call result
whereas this wouldn't have that issue: if (UNEXPECTED(is_null(a = b(Z_STR_P(c))))) {
@Fabor ikr
 
@AndreaFaulds s/brackets/parenthesis/
 
@LeviMorrison :D
 
Also, I would say the issue here is because of style.
 
string(239) "class Foo
property foo public not-static long 12
property bar public not-static long 13
method public not-static not-final getFoo long
begin
var $1 unknown
propertyfetch foo $this $1
return $1
endmethod public not-static not-final
endclass"
 
Actually, along the same lines, a macro for if (UNEXPECTED()) could go some ways to reducing bracket hell
 
7:13 PM
Just do the assignment on the line before.
 
@LeviMorrison not possible, if/elseif/else
 
You posted an if. It can be done before an if.
 
sure, but it's also done in else ifs :)
 
I'd say that's probably horrible as well.
(Would have to see a specific example)
 
@LeviMorrison grep EG(function_table) in zend_vm_def.h
ifu (is_null(a = b(Z_STR_P(c)))) { ?
 
7:16 PM
Hi, is it faster to do 1 big mysql dump or lots of separate dumps? :)
 
Although, actually
is_null is unnecessary... we could just use !...
if (UNEXPECTED(!(a = b(Z_STR_P(c))))) {
yay
maybe I should make a language with POWER BRACKETS
 
Ugh, I would not want an IFU macro.
 
@LeviMorrison yeah, it doesn't seem like such a good idea
though, god, it'd be so much nicer than if (EXPECTED( everywhere :(
 
I think the EXPECTED and UNEXPECTED macros are horrid
 
Yeah.
 
7:18 PM
Want to know the proper way of doing that? Use your compiler for profile guided optimization...
 
Do our target platforms even support static prediction hints?!
 
It's stuff like this that makes PHP-src just that much less enjoyable.
 
They haven't been in Intel processors since the Pentium 4
@LeviMorrison You know what... kinda tempted to #define them away
 
@AndreaFaulds yes
 
@ircmaxell Oh? I thought modern platforms didn't support hints?
 
7:21 PM
the processor may not
but the compiler does
for example
 
Ah, right
 
If we're going to make the compiler work we should just use profile guided optimizations.
 
to determine which way to branch (jmpz vs jmpnz)
 
I agree with Levi there
 
Also, the cost of getting one of these macros wrong could be quite high.
 
7:22 PM
@LeviMorrison not all of our target compilers support that
 
Though doing a good job of profiling is important
 
@ircmaxell I honestly don't care.
 
Bear in mind that the PHP test suite is not a typical application
@ircmaxell not all of our target compilers support hints either
 
We don't ship binaries.
 
We don't even ship working code.
ducks
 
7:23 PM
@AndreaFaulds precisely why expected/unexpected is actually somewhat reasonable
I'd be curious to see statistics on compilation options
but if you're talking about optimizations, how many people are compiling PHP at -O3, and do we know if PHP is stable at -O3?
 
I test on O3.
Everyone should test O3.
If code doesn't work on O3 you are making some wrong assumptions.
 
We also should compile on -Wall, though we don't.
 
@AndreaFaulds yup
 
-Wall -Wextra
 
@LeviMorrison does travis run the test suite on -03?
 
7:25 PM
-Mauer -Antifaschistischerschutzwall
 
New projects should start with a flags line with something like: -std=<your choice> -Wall -Wextra -Werror
This generates basically the maximum amount of warnings and errors on warning.
You have no idea how worried I get when I build projects and see warnings.
There are legitimate reasons for not erroring on warning; unused arguments are not always an issue, for example.
 
@ircmaxell public $foo, $bar;
 
I know it's not a perfect solution, but could we at least slim down the hint macros a bit?
 
Maybe it's a sign of a design that could be work (emphasis on maybe).
 
EXPECTED() and UNEXPECTED() are pretty long
 
7:28 PM
Would be wonderful if UNEXPECTED was equivalent to !EXPECTED ^^
 
For hints they take up way too much space, a lot of common Zend macros are shorter, e.g. EG(), Z_STR_P()
@LeviMorrison hah
I wonder if it is
In any sane compiler it probably is, right?
 
Someone should test. They might actually be equivalent.
 
hmm
would anyone mind them becoming EXP() and NEXP()?
 
@NikiC I didn't realize that was valid syntax...
@NikiC I didn't realize that was valid syntax...
 
Really?
 
7:30 PM
@ircmaxell I don't get what you mean there
@AndreaFaulds why not just yoda?
if you assign-and-compare always yoda
 
@NikiC ?
 
Yoda, you must.
 
Also, yeah, I figured out earlier that you can just do !()
Do you mean foo = bar(), foo ?
 
I mean NULL == (a = fn())
I left the parens because I'm not sure in C, but in PHP you can write null === $a = fn() this way
 
@NikiC Ah! I see, good thinking.
I wonder why we do == NULL in Zend in places, though. I wonder if it's bad habits from PHP code
Since in PHP !x =/= x === NULL
 
7:35 PM
Some might consider the explicit comparison to be good practice
 
Possibly.
 
Especially those influenced by Java, where it is required
 
What, really? Java sux then rox please don't hurt my family please
:p
 
@AndreaFaulds EXP() is a 'bit' confusing with the exp() math function.
 
I was writing Java yesterday. Always forgot to use a != null (means passing some Object to a place where a boolean is required..., means compile failure)
 
7:41 PM
@Danack Yeah, I did think that might be a problem.
I think you'd easily distinguish them in practice, however ;)
 
Well, most of the time.
 
if (EXP(exp()))
By the way, could we make $_ special?
Completely unrelated, but having a stock, possibly optimised garbage variable might be handy
 
@NikiC well, the namesapce name visitor adds a namespacedName subnode
I'd like to be able to add that at construction time, but I can't
so I have to do things like:
$node = new AstClass("Foo");
$node->namespacedName = new FullyQualified(["Foo"], []);
 
@NikiC } else if (UNEXPECTED(NULL == (fbc = zend_lookup_function(Z_STR_P(function_name))))) { <-- happy? :)
Actually, you know what C needs?
.
 
Hi can someone please tell me if its better to dump large SQL files into a MySQL database in one big go or would it be faster to split the SQL files up and insert them that way?
 
7:49 PM
(== NULL) (fbc = zend_lookup_function Z_STR_P function_name) <-- Haskell-style syntax
@jskidd3 What do you mean by "better"?
 
@AndreaFaulds uh, yeah, no.
 
@AndreaFaulds faster
 
@NikiC ^^
 
If it was one big file it would be 5GB
20-30 million rows
 
@jskidd3 Simple question, probably a complicated answer. The only thing that makes a huge difference is turning off indexes while doing large inserts.......but you should probably be looking at a dedicated program for doing this, not just doing it via sql.
 
7:51 PM
@jskidd3 5GB is not big for a dump. Leave it as one file, and just disable indexes on import
 
e.g. vitobotta.com/… - disclaimer, I have not actually used this.
 
@ircmaxell Fantastic thanks
One other thing
Bearing in mind it's 5 gigabytes worth, would another option be to just insert dynamically while parsing the file?
I have written a script that parses lots of XML files, its either parse and write SQL to large file
Or stream and insert directly into database using PDO driver
 
you haven't said why you're doing this
 
because I need to insert a lot of data into a database
I thought I covered that :P
 
eih
 
7:55 PM
@jskidd3 You can use LOAD DATA INFILE
 
not if your database administrators are competent
 
@Fabor Can you do that with SQL files also? I was under the impression it was only for CSVs
 
By the way
you should do this with the mysql client and not from PHP code
unless it's not one-off
 
@AndreaFaulds s:/would/should/
 
oh, didn't see it was sql
 
7:57 PM
I have access to exec() so can just do a dump like that if its quicker
 
@ircmaxell :s/s:/:s/
 
@ircmaxell Just a tip, you can write new FullyQualified("Foo") there as well ;)
 
@NikiC fair, but the point was more about the separate initializer
 
@ircmaxell So what you want to do is new AstClass("Foo", ["namespacedName" => new FullyQualified("Foo")]);?
 
yup
and with other subnodes as well
(I annotate type information into nodes as jitType)
 
8:00 PM
Heh, that's what the attributes are for. But I get that that's more to type ^^
 
hello guys,can you help me with this little unix command? I know it's not a php question but i think most of you'd be able to answer this question.
how do i add a mail user from command line in ubuntu? i mean i want to get such email abuse@example.com. so i need to have an abuse user, not for login but for mail
 
hmmm, fair enough
 
$ sapi/cli/php -r 'spl_autoload_register(function ($name) { var_dump($name); include "$name.php"; }, true, false, SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION); test();'
string(4) "test"
hello, world
$ sapi/cli/php -r 'spl_autoload_register(function ($name) { var_dump($name); include "$name.php"; }, true, false, SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION); $x = "TEST"; $x();'
string(4) "TEST"
hello, world
$ sapi/cli/php -r 'spl_autoload_register(function ($name) { var_dump($name); include "$name.php"; }, true, false, SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION); $x = '\test'; $x();'
^^
ES FUNKTIONIERT!!!!!!
PHP 7 will have function autoloading, if all goes well :)
 
so you've got code that I had running 2 years ago... :-P
also, strong -1 on true, false
 
@ircmaxell :p
@ircmaxell That's the existing API, I can't do much about it. I want to avoid adding yet another set of functions
We already have TWO autoloading APIs
 
8:06 PM
also: did you patch function autoloading in, or did you refactor that god-aweful shitshow of an implementation of spl_autoload?
@AndreaFaulds which is why my original patch refactored them to one implemenation under the hood, not two as it is today
 
@ircmaxell More the former than the latter. It shares some of the implementation with SPL.
 
@AndreaFaulds Drop the old one.
 
after looking at the SPL implementation, it needs to go
 
Btw, I finished up an old HT post earlier: nikic.github.io/2014/05/23/…
 
Not really.
 
8:07 PM
it's a miracle it works as is
 
The SPL implementation isn't that bad...
 
yes it is
 
And spent an inordinate amount of time fighting Jekyll and Disqus again :(
 
Basically, it works like this. I made zend_lookup_function, equivalent to zend_lookup_class and very similar. It then calls a C function containing the guts of spl_autoload_call.
 
yes, and spl_autoload_call is where all the horror was
 
8:08 PM
spl_autoload_call is the nicest-looking part of the SPL autoloading implementation
 
to autoload, it calls a C function, which calls a PHP function which calls a C function, whcih then calls an array of PHP functions in sequence
 
l_autoload_running = SPL_G(autoload_running);
SPL_G(autoload_running) = 1;
ZEND_HASH_FOREACH_STR_KEY_PTR(functions_table, func_name, alfi) {
    zend_call_method(Z_ISUNDEF(alfi->obj)? NULL : &alfi->obj, alfi->ce, &alfi->func_ptr, func_name->val, func_name->len, retval, 1, name, NULL);
    zend_exception_save();
    if (retval) {
        zval_ptr_dtor(retval);
        retval = NULL;
    }
    if (zend_hash_exists(symbol_table, lc_name)) {
        break;
    }
} ZEND_HASH_FOREACH_END();
zend_exception_restore();
That's the main bit that's shared
That and _autoload_(un)register (though most of what it does is skipped for functions since functions don't use the __autoload standin, but rather go straight to an array of PHP functions)
 
mine was 128 lines of code more than the current implementation, and includes a full refactor: github.com/ircmaxell/php-src/compare/function-autoloading
 
zend_autoload.c sure is pretty
 
@ircmaxell eek
 
8:14 PM
Basically, the way I've done it, functions are all nice, classes are just as horrid as before
 
@NikiC that's how it's worked since 5.2 included spl_autoload_register
 
But you could quite easily scrap __autoload
spl_autoload_register is a gigantic hack, it's pretty amusing
It's weird that it's internal at all, you could implement it in userland.
 
the only part you can't implement in userland is compatibility with an existing __autoload
 
@ircmaxell Only if you lack runkit! :p
But yes.
 
8:17 PM
@ircmaxell spl_autoload_call isn't horrifying at all
It's how it gets called that is.
 
that it's a php function is
 
the PHP function to call is cached in EG(autoload_func): lxr.php.net/xref/PHP_5_6/Zend/zend_execute_API.c#998
the whole thing is just...
 
it's very roundabout
 
There were 2 main gripes with my implementation last time it was proposed:
1. That I namespaced the new autoloader inside php (which who cares, move it out if people don't like it).
2. That I allowed declaring autoloader callbacks that could deal with multiple types (functions, classes and constants) rather than requiring a one-callback-to-one-type relationship
 
8:24 PM
I have no problem with 2, but I didn't (and don't) like adding a new set of functions to handle autoloading
The existing API isn't really broken
 
1. pls namespace oh pls
 
yes it is
you're adding a 4th constant parameter to a argument list that's preceeded by 2 booleans
spl_autoload_list <-- how do you plan on implementing that so that end-users know what type of autoloader they get back (whether it's a class, function, etc)
also: the api is in SPL. It's not a SPL functionality, it's engine functionality (and should be better hooked into it)
the current API works for classes
but when you add in functions and constants, it really doesn't work. You can shoe-horn it in, and make it work, but that doesn't mean it's clean
I'm definitely not saying my implementation is perfect
 
I agree with Anthony on this one.
 
but the current one is worse IMHO
 
It's not really SPL, and the current API sucks.
 
8:29 PM
@ircmaxell Do you mean spl_autoload_functions? I solved that.
 
@AndreaFaulds how?
 
spl_autoload_functions(SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION);
 
so you only return one type of autoloader in the list
 
Each type of autoloader has its own list
 
fair
 
8:30 PM
Obviously it'd break things if it started returning function autoloaders. So it doesn't, it continues to only return class autoloaders unless you ask otherwise
I realise that spl_autoload_register($foo, true, false, SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION); isn't the nicest. But it's a function typically called only once in an application by automatically-generated code.
 
if I cleaned up the implementation that I have (make it ready for 7, and test it), would someone want to revive and run with the RFC?
 
We've done rand() and mt_rand() before, mysql_escape_string() and mysql_real_escape_string() before... I'd rather not have __autoload, spl_autoload_register and php\autoload_register.
 
@AndreaFaulds both were because of underlying library changes tho
 
@ircmaxell So were mysql_ and mysqli_, but I don't think it really justifies it.
 
I'd add a deprecated flag to __autoload
and eventually deprecate spl_autoload_register, which would only exist for legacy reasons
@AndreaFaulds I still don't think that's the same comparison
 
8:34 PM
Yeah, true
 
then again, just using spl_autoload_register does keep with php's spirit of "just hack it in and make it work"
 
The other thing is that named parameters would solve the only real problem with this approach
 
spl_autoload_register($foo, type: SPL_AUTOLOAD_FUNCTION);
 

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