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12:59 AM
yeah, we do haha
that change in classification has huge geopolitical ramifications, namely for the resources off the continental shelf
 
1:13 AM
hi
 
yo yo yo
What do you guys think of this type annotation? Seems about right?

`def __getitem__(self, i: Union[int,slice]) -> Union[List[MyClass], MyClass]`
 
 
1 hour later…
2:27 AM
Hi, does anyone have experience with Python SMTP for Gmail. I have tried less-secure apps and also 2fa with the app password and both returns an error.
Error: (535, b'5.7.8 Username and Password not accepted. Learn more at\n5.7.8 support.google.com/mail/… b7sm25632476pfl.195 - gsmtp')
with smtplib.SMTP_SSL('smtp.gmail.com', 465) as smtp:
    print(config['EMAIL']['user'], config['EMAIL']['password'])
    smtp.login(config['EMAIL']['user'], config['EMAIL']['password'])
    smtp.send_message(msg)
context=ssl.create_default_context()
server = smtplib.SMTP('smtp.office365.com', 587)
server = smtplib.SMTP('smtp-mail.outlook.com', 587)
server = smtplib.SMTP_SSL('smtp.gmail.com', 465)
server.ehlo()
server.starttls(context=context)
server.ehlo()

server.login(config['EMAIL']['user'], config['EMAIL']['password'])
server.sendmail(sent_from, to, email_text)
server.quit()
Ah okay, got the format down, could an admin help me delete the previous message?
 
3:12 AM
cbg
 
 
2 hours later…
5:22 AM
@Mikhail It's not wrong, but you might want to make it more accurate with typing.overload
 
Hi, I am using FastAPI. I want to send emails to users which will contain links which will auto-authenticate them on my website, so they don't need to log-in manually.

I saw python package which can help me with generating such links but I forgot its name.

Can you help me?
 
5:44 AM
@metatoaster you deserve it! :P
 
6:28 AM
cbg
 
7:12 AM
cbg
 
folks. bizzare one for ya. first, are you able to repro this? second, if yes, what is going on?
import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([115079, 1])
print(s[0] in s) # False
 
I've ran it online and I do get False
 
really stange same here however when printing s[0] I get the expected number
 
import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([0, 1, 2, 3, 115079])
for x in s:
    print(x in s) #True, True, True, True, False
I don't know if that can narrow it down but it maybe has to do with certain values
I've tried with multiple values for s but as soon as the last two values are not following it will return False for the last one.
[0, 1, 2] will return True for s[2] in s whereas [0, 1, 3] will return False for s[2] in s.
 
ok. can you repro this.
import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([2, 1])
print(s[0] in s) # False
 
7:26 AM
Yep
Looks like s[0] has to be in "order".
 
well, no
import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([2])
print(s[0] in s) # False
try this.
 
I get False too, unless I have s = pd.Series([0]).
 
literal yam
oh yamming yam*, this means in must be using indexes
 
Well if you get the explanation of this behavior, please share it because I don't get it
[2, 3, 4] works for s[0] in s but not [3, 4, 5]
 
well, i think it's clear. someone, somewhere, decided that in should check the indexes instead of values
i just now need to find out if this is mentioned in docs
however, i think this is a sin. even if it's mentioned in docs, this makes no sense to do this way.
 
7:43 AM
Oh okay I got it. I don't understand why they would do that.
 
found it amusing that they themselves put it in a gotcha section
thanks for testing the codes out, the back and forth definitely helped me figure it out.
 
isin they recommend using
 
I'm pretty bored at work so thank you for giving me brain stimulation
 
@ParitoshSingh Thanks for that really useful little tidbit to learn
 
8:43 AM
@Aran-Fey I looked at the docs, but how is this better than using typing.Union I mean I am writing one version of the function for each type it can get, isnt it WET?
 
Unlike Union, overloading lets the type checker know that if you pass in a slice, a list will come out, and if you pass in an int, a single object will come out. And sure, requires more typing, but I wouldn't call that WET
 
ahh I see, I was wondering why the decorators could not just be stacked, but yeah the return type thing you mentioned makes sense
 
9:12 AM
just checked the what's new for 3.11, the enhanced error location will make it easier to debug oneliners docs.python.org/3.11/whatsnew/…
 
That's pretty neat
I hope it will make people read the trace more
 
 
3 hours later…
12:07 PM
@python_user we definitely need that to debug the code examples in the asspression PEP
 
12:19 PM
@ParitoshSingh That's consistent with what dicts do. if k in some_dict test for the key k, not the value.
(But I know almost nothing about Pandas).
 
@PM2Ring I though so too, but list(s) wasn't consistent with that. At least for dicts in answers "is in this iterable".
 
@PM2Ring the issue is that dataframes are like dicts, but Series are a lot more list-like
List with auxiliary indices
 
@AndrasDeak Ah, ok.
 
12:56 PM
Are there "advanced" python features you would suggest looking at to understand it more?
 
Earlier today, I spent an hour or so in escape sequence hell, trying to inject a string from Python into JavaScript. Sage has this general show() function, which gets used to display 2D & 3D plots. It can also display MathJax. And HTML & SVG fragments or files. So a Sage / Python script can create output as an HTML page, complete with JavaScript.
However, formatting Python data so that it's compatible with JS can be a bit fiddly... I eventually realised I could use json.dumps to do most of the work, but I still had to tweak it a little for it to handle quotes correctly.
 
@PM2Ring What is the use case that made you do this? Having to make Markdown tables while on the phone too many times ?
 
@AlexandreMarcq I hardly use my computer these days. I mostly use my phone. It's kind of fun being able to write & run Python on the phone. :)
I already had a similar program for making MathJax tables, and I thought I'd quickly hack it to do Markdown. But I ended up mostly writing it from scratch. That didn't take long, but then I decided to add that JavaScript button...
I used an earlier version (before the button) to create the table here: physics.stackexchange.com/a/652569/123208
@AlexandreMarcq Some recent additions to Python are directionally ambiguous. Some people think they're advanced, other people think they're retarded. ;)
 
1:13 PM
Oh I understand, then your program must be a great relief !
@PM2Ring Python's getting everywhere, I'm sad I was too "old" to have it on my calculator in high school
 
@AlexandreMarcq I haven't created many Markdown tables so far, but I'll probably use them more often now that I have that script.
It's great that Python's becoming even more popular, but there's a downside. There are now a lot of people teaching Python who don't know it very well, and who are more comfortable teaching Java. And so they can end up teaching Python as if it's some distorted version of Java.
 
1:31 PM
Was thinking about that the other day, I don't know if Python is appropriate as a first language. I mean, it's "easier" to get familiar with, but maybe people can get bad habits ?
On the other hand I really suffered learning C as a first language in my first year.
(mostly pointer induced headaches)
 
I don't think there's anything bad about learning programming with Python. It's the teachers teachers' skills that are the problem.
 
There you go
 
Yam. Markdown strikethrough is worse than tar.
 
@AlexandreMarcq I love Python, but I've often worried that it's not necessarily a good choice as a first language. OTOH, JavaScript & PHP are probably worse choices. I don't know Java well enough to have a properly informed opinion, but it seems overly verbose and "fussy" to me, since everything needs to be in a class.
And C isn't a good 1st language either, mostly because of the pointer issues. And its lack of OOP, which is pretty old-fashioned.
 
I thought Java was a great compromise because I see it as a step between low-level and high-level. But again, I don't think I have enough experience with programming.
 
1:39 PM
I wrote C for a couple of decades before learning Python, but I rarely use it these days, and because I'm so rusty with it I find it a bit harder to read, especially compared to Python.
 
@PM2Ring I believe every CS student should one day scream at a Segmentation fault but maybe later in their programming journey.
 
I didn't have an issue with pointers when learning C. I was writing assembler 5 or 6 years before I even knew C existed. :)
 
Well yeah that must help. Before C I was writing TI-BASIC, I definitively did not have the same problems at that time laurel.
 
I am putting some log data on cloud (Digital Ocean) using python code which has import boto3 and the code works fine and logs file gets uploaded to the cloud successfully, but same code when I encrypt it will give the following error: global name 'boto3' is not defined
may anyone help me to resolve the problem
thanks
 
On the early Amigas, there was no memory protection. So if your C / assembler program crashed with a seg fault, the machine would crash and you'd have to reboot. Of course, crashing is preferable to having your rogue program silently corrupt another process's memory...
 
1:46 PM
@anil How do you "encrypt it"?
 
@PM2Ring For some reason I have this desire to go back to low-level, do stuff "by hand". But not C, maybe C++.
 
using pyconcrete this link:github.com/Falldog/pyconcrete
 
@AlexandreMarcq I never used TI-Basic, but I did use many dialects of Basic. At one stage, I was using 3 slightly different Basics on the same day. :) Despite its limitations (or maybe because of them) Basic is a good first language.
 
@anil And do you get the error when you encrypt the program, or later one when you decrypt it to run it?
 
@MisterMiyagi No I did not
 
1:56 PM
@MisterMiyagi That's a fair point. OTOH, although I love that Python doesn't force you to think about datatypes all the time, or worry about low-level memory stuff, it does concern me that kids learning Python may not get a proper understanding of datatypes and memory, etc.
But I guess they can learn that stuff when & if they need it. Still, going from Python to a C family language could be a bit of a shock to the system. ;)
 
@PM2Ring Yes I really liked it. It was fun to make little games and whatnot.
 
@MisterMiyagi does it so that the pyconcrete not able find the path of boto3 as python can get easily Note: I am working on raspbian embedded board
 
@PM2Ring I agree with that – seen it often enough. What I think Python has to offer here is that, for a mainstream language, it's meta yet easy enough to actually walk people through implementing some of these things themselves.
Admittedly, I've rarely seen courses take that route...
 
Our Python course was two days long and taught by the same teacher that gave us a JavaScript course.
 
Urgh. I've rarely had short courses work out well. Seen the carnage both from the student and teacher side.
 
2:11 PM
There was too much of a difference between students for it to work anyway.
It was a mix of IoT majors and Cybersecurity majors.
But at least we got to learn about classes and loops. :)
 
I have been making requests at a certain website for months now, but for some reason the proxy provider I was using suddenly couldn't make successful requests anymore after. It's like a 100% failure rate
I get a HTTP ERROR 502
 
Sounds like they noticed months of dubious requests in their logs from one ip, and blocked it.
 
The IPs are rotating though and they contain residential IPs as well. I was able to do things normally 1-2 days ago
But suddenly every single IP stopped working for that URL and my request volume isn't high at all even for the proxy standards
I tested the request using my IP and it works fine
 
Ok, then they're fingerprinting you some other way.
 
The proxy provider also tried on their end and it's not going through so it must be in their end
But they are able to make request on other parts of the website just the URL i'm using is oddly not working
 
2:25 PM
Karma?
 
I don't know well the proxy service is really intended for these purposes I think they have templates for the site
 
Well, good luck with that
 
It was about time, really
 
I remember the company takes care of their IPs properly but I probably have to learn more about these things
Maybe I have to include some randomization
In the keywords
 
Go back to the basics
Mar 21 '19 at 11:19, by Andras Deak
@Pherdindy oh, now I know why your user was familiar. You were struggling to get around the safeguards on lazada.com.ph to scrape what they didn't want you to scrape
 
2:34 PM
I read their terms and they didnt seem to mind especially i do it reaally small scale it's not conclusive yet they blocked it maybe just an issue with the proxy
The proxy still checking it out but i'd happily comply if there was any issues with my usage
 
@Pherdindy If they don't mind, why do you need a proxy?
If they don't mind, ask them for help.
 
Just to be sure since information doesn't really spread accurately in big companies
I am not experienced in these things also so I just want to be doubly sure
 
Does "didn't seem to mind" here mean "the terms specifically say it's allowed" or does it mean "the terms specifically disallow it, but I tried a little bit of scraping and I didn't get immediately banned, so I assumed they weren't being serious"
 
I was thinking any web scrapping should be illegal if that was the case
So I was thinking the tech should be nearly forbidden to be used on websites if it was so unethical
 
If what was the case?
 
2:37 PM
@Pherdindy it usually is
Awaiting answer:
2 mins ago, by Andras Deak
@Pherdindy If they don't mind, why do you need a proxy?
 
It isn't something you would normally ask if they allowed it. Most of the time they would just say no to most things if they're unsure. There also really isn't a team you can ask directly about these things
 
I'll take that as a "help session is over"
 
I think big companies usually do have a person who's solely responsible for determining exactly what their rules are, and explaining them to interested parties
 
Well the proxy should be the one to answer since they offer data collection as their service to begin with and they seem to be okay with it
They even asked when they noticed some failure in requests when they normally had 99% success rate with the site normally
 
If it's something that exposes them to legal liability, you can be dang sure they know exactly what their policy is, and it's not something they came up with on a whim
 
2:44 PM
Yeah although I think i'm not really scrapping their site
 
Yeah, it's not "'really'" bad, right?
 
I'm just using their URL to make requests not really using fancy techniques
 
@Pherdindy obviously. We're done here by the way.
 
Honestly, I think most terms and conditions are a bag of hot air and I'm happy to ignore them unless the company is infamously litigious. But I'm still not very interested in thinking up bot-ban-circumvention techniques, because it sounds like it would be unpleasant guesswork.
Unrelated topic. My attempts to parse csv with regex is partially successful, but stymied by the fact that "csv" isn't a real data format with a single conventional specification.
 
I actually found out web scraping wasn't legal where I live, useful to know
 
2:50 PM
I'm just looking for solutions if there are more surely legal ways to gather any kind of useful data
 
There's rfc 4180, but it differs somewhat from colloquial csv. Notably, you can't use backslash to escape quote marks.
Perhaps I'll look at Python's csv module source code and try to figure out what they think a csv is.
 
@Kevin What made you try this?
 
Somebody came in the other day asking if it was possible to parse a line of csv that had multiple kinds of delimiters.
csv itself can't do it, and their attempted use of re.split failed because it didn't skip over delimiters in quotes.
The knee-jerk reaction is to say that regex can't parse any sufficiently complex grammar. This is often true. For example "any number of left brackets, followed by the same number of right brackets" is beyond the power of the re module. But I suspect that csv is just barely un-complex enough to be parseable.
 
@Kevin IMHO, if they use multiple kinds of delimiters they have no right to call it csv. OTOH, I guess it's ok to have one kind of delimiter to separate fields, but another kind that gets used to create subfields within a field.
FWIW, I still get upvotes from time to time on this post about using regex to parse HTML: unix.stackexchange.com/a/181264/88378 People seem to like it, even though I try to discourage them. I even linked to the famous bobince post.
 
Yeah it was basically a frankenstein format that resulted from an undocumented black box with funny ideas about serialization
I'm going to go out on a limb and declare that regex can correctly capture all of the href attributes belonging to an <a> tag inside a well-formed HTML document
 
3:03 PM
CSV is fine for tabular data. If that table wants to extend into the 3rd dimension (or beyond), it might be a Good Idea to consider a format with a bit more structure.
@Kevin Yeah. You can always parse little well-defined chunks. It's when people try to parse whole arbitrary HTML documents that things get nasty. But, eg , parsing the HTML of this chat room is pretty straightforward.
Or maybe I'm mis-remembering. ;) I once wrote a parser that lets me read chat in the CLI, but I think I parsed the transcript for that. OTOH, I did write a little script that tells me who's currently in the room.
 
IIRC, the HTML of this room is pretty sane. The javascript on the other hand...
 
:S user keep post his question several times! am not sure which one shall i flag even. last or first!

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/68472330/python-selenium-how-to-webscrape-this-dropdown

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/68473642/selenium-webscrape-this-field

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/68476454/selenium-beautifulsoup-webscrape-this-field

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/68476454/selenium-beautifulsoup-webscrape-this-field

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/68477401/webscrape-this-field-beautifulsoup-requests-python-selenium
 
I don't think it matters too much as long as you flag one (and only one). If you want someone to decide for you, I nominate the last one.
 
@AlexandreMarcq I see from your profile that you used to play bass. So did I, many years ago. (I can barely play guitar these days: it's too painful on my joints). You might enjoy this clip of an early Stevie Wonder funk / soul classic: I Was Made To Love Her The visual is an anim of James Jamerson's sublime bassline.
@αԋɱҽԃαмєяιcαη Flag one, and put the links to the others in the flag comment.
@αԋɱҽԃαмєяιcαη If you tag those with the generic tag, we can dup-hammer them.
 
I wonder if that bassline visualization is objectively correct based on sheet music and/or spectrogrm analysis, or if the graphic designer just put down squiggly lines by ear. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
 
3:16 PM
@PM2Ring Caught me off guard for a sec! My basses have been getting dusty since I started working sadly. I'll take a look when I get home.
 
@Kevin same thoughts :D
 
@Kevin I'm not 100% sure. In some places, the notes look like they're going the opposite direction to what they sound, but maybe that's an illusion. :)
@AlexandreMarcq No worries.
 
I was hesitating on getting actual one-on-one courses to get back into playing.
 
I don't think you can cleanly map chords (which definitionally contain multiple notes) to a 2d graph, but I'd be satisfied with some lossy algorithm as long as it's consistent. "map only the chord's root note", for example
 
Stevie's mother helped him write that song. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lula_Mae_Hardaway
@Kevin The bassline is almost always one note at a time. Sometimes you play the note & its 5th or octave. So it's perfectly legit to just graph a single note.
 
3:29 PM
Finally a stringed instrument for people that only like to touch one string at a time
 
I don't have large enough hands to play chords under the 12th fret.
Even then it can get tricky.
 
I'm far too busy to learn 2^6 chords, but I can learn 6 notes
 
Early jazz basslines were played on tuba (or euphonium), and were mostly root & 5th of the chord, with occasional connecting notes. String bass also follows that pattern, but makes it easier to play little scale runs interconnecting the core root & 5th notes.
 
Possible explanation for the line traveling in seemingly wrong directions: whenever the actual bass plays middle A and then descends to low G, the visualization draws a line from A up to G. Modular arithmetic!
 
It takes stamina to be a good bass player. Not only because the strings are so large. Doing a lot of that root + 5th stuff can be a strain. It's less stressful when your hands can "walk" over the fingerboard a bit, rather than playing the same repetitive pattern, over & over.
 
3:36 PM
I loved confusing other bassists at my school with my lefty bass. Watching them panick as their muscle memory was made useless.
 
@Kevin That's definitely a possibility.
Left-handed bassists are in big demand in Beatles tribute bands. :)
 
@PM2Ring Yeah like playing Muse's Uprising to train your pinky finger.
 
If only we lived in a four-dimensional space, you could simply turn yourself or the guitar inside-out so the handedness matches
 
the handedness and the prices*
 
If you invert yourself, remember to invert your tablature too, or else it will look backwards
 
3:41 PM
@Kevin One perk is players are mirrored to me so it's nice for learning when watching covers.
 
Sounds... Handy.
 
Some of the classical composer played around with inversions like that. Either Bach or Mozart wrote a duet for pianos where the score for the 2nd piano is the score for the 1st piano turned upside down.
 
I believe it. I've heard a number of stories about Mozart's quirky behavior.
And I recall from GEB that Bach liked to put easter eggs in his work, so it's on brand for him too
 
I get what you mean, but I always find it a bit confusing watching left-handed players. Especially ones that play right-handed guitars upside-down!
 
I don't even know why I went left-handed, would have been simpler the other way around I guess?
 
3:48 PM
@Kevin I'm pretty sure that I read about that reversible concerto in GEB.
 
Plausible
 
I've met a few left-handers who decided to play right-handed. It's great for chords, but not so good if you want to get into dextrous finger-picking.
 
It seems obvious that learning an instrument with your non-dominant hand makes things more difficult in the short term. But I'm curious if there's much of a distinction in the long term. Can you simply train all the clumsiness out of your non-dominant hand? Or are there inherent unchangeable factors?
It's tricky to gather data about this question because you can't just point at a non-dominant player and say "look, this guy is really good, so there must be no long-term difference". For all we know, maybe that guy would be twice as good now if he had chosen to play with his dominant hand, N years ago.
we're going to need about a thousand twins for this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_study
I wonder if piano players can usually get their hands to indistinguishable levels of dexterity... Or does the left always tend to make more errors than the right, no matter how much they drive down the average error rate?
 
4:16 PM
@Kevin Well, with most instruments that require two hands, both hands need to be fairly dextrous, but the dominant hand is generally used for the stuff that needs the most dexterity. I'm sure that learning to finger single notes & chords on guitar with my left hand improved its dexterity. But its the right hand that mostly controls the exact timing of the note, especially the initial attack of the note or chord, although the left hand can be used to "hammer-on" notes every now & then.
Take a look at Billy & Bryan playing the Tony Rice song Freeborn Man. Their left hands are doing amazing things, but the precision in the right hands is phenomenal, especially towards the end when they're seamlessly trading licks.
FWIW, Bryan was one of Billy's teachers. He's just doing a guest appearance there, he's not a regular member of the band. Sorry, the sound quality in that clip is a little muddy, especially near the start. There was a more recent version of them doing that song, posted a couple of months ago with even more incredible playing, and crystal clear sound, but I guess it's been taken down and it'll resurface in a commercial form.
 
5:10 PM
Informative thanks
 
@Kevin I believe the answer is yes, you should be able to train the clumsiness out. i might be able to answer that for myself. i play the piano (well, keyboard really) but im a left hander. however, i learnt with a harmonium first (which is keyboard-like, but played with one hand). So i played with my left hand for a few years
naturally, when you switch to piano/keyboard, you don't get the luxury of using your left hand for the right hand portions. So i had to learn to use my right hand (my weak hand) after having learnt to play a different instrument with my left. I think today, my right hand is capable of playing melodies just fine, perhaps even better than my left.
 
Hmm, good data
 
So yeah, bit of a subjective experience, but i essentially had to pick up how to play the right hand after having the luxury of using my left for melodies on a harmonium for a very long time.
 
I sense a market opportunity for a piano whose high notes are on the left
 
perhaps. :)
 
5:17 PM
That should confuse everyone from the mirror universe
 
Sell them to rich people who need more symmetry in their grand halls
You can't just buy a second regular piano because the curvy bit in the back won't be properly mirrored
 
@Kevin I was going to say that the human brain is very good at rerouting pathways, should the need arise. I guess the question is whether you can have a need great enough without actually losing your dominant hand.
 
Dang, the backwards piano already exists. youtube.com/watch?v=Eepuu6H7Ylc confirms that there's at least one backwards piano in the physical world, and a number of electric keyboards have a "reverse" feature.
He goes on to say that playing a normal song on a backwards piano will produce interesting yet pleasant results. I would have liked to listen to an example.
 
hm, but digital reverse doesn't make sense in my mind. the blacks and whites would still be wrong, no? unless reversing also shifts C to E
also, shame that video literally just talks, but doesn't even show an example
 
5:35 PM
close as primarily opinion-based
 
Hmm maybe I incorrectly conflated "electric keyboard" and "piano software with no physical component"
It's easy enough to flip the black and white keys when they're just bitmaps
 
oh no, it's uh.. not the fact that you can't flip the keys. it's that a scale is not actually symmetric. so if you just flip centered around the C key, everything becomes... "wrong".
if you're not familiar with music theory, basically, theres a white key, then 2 group of black keys with whites in between. then theres a 3 group of black keys with whites in between. that's one group of tones.
 
While looking for backwards music I found table canon which is perhaps what PM was talking about earlier. Bach's The Musical Offering contains one.
 
so, if you simply flipped it, you break the 2-black group then 3-black group pattern
i suppose that's all the reverse does, and it accepts that the black and white pattern will be broken/reversed as well
 
I have a passing familiarity with music theory, to the extent of what I can absorb by reading Wikipedia articles. I usually get flummoxed trying to determine which properties of music are objective, and which are subjective, and which are cultural
 
5:41 PM
Music, objective? :P
Isn't the whole "geometric series(?) of frequencies as notes" based on "humans tend to think this sounds OK"?
 
aye. i recently learnt that the scales we take for granted aren't the only music "systems" out there, and that there's some systems with more than 12 notes even
 
Right. "European humans tend to think this sounds OK".
 
Yeah, a system's choice of notes is what I had in mind when I wrote 'cultural"
"subjective" kind of folds into "physiological" in the sense that some people may have greater hearing range than others, etc
 
I doubt that music normally goes into the 10kHz+ range. Unless it's weird music.
 
I'm also thinking of how the human voice is quite complicated when objectively analyzed, e.g. with a spectrogram, as illustrated at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_voice. But if you ask a random person on the street to describe someone's voice, they might boil it all the way down to just "deep"
 
5:51 PM
@Kevin that's probably neural network dumbing down things. And the "deep" is probably a base frequency.
Same as how various instruments have very different tones, yet they can play a given pitch all the same.
I have no idea if I used those words correctly.
 
I speculate that there's a good chunk of auditory processing going on in the brain that's specialized for human voices, and a lot of it isn't consciously accessible
 
I've seen spectrograms of vowels, and I know what spectrograms mean, yet it doesn't help me at all. They are just vowels.
TTS/STT systems know a lot about this
 
Yes i remember trying to read up on the principle of text to speech, or vice versa, and boggling at the mechanics of it
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formant gives some interesting insight on why we can distinguish vowel sounds even when the speaker varies the pitch of their voice
"The information that humans require to distinguish between speech sounds can be represented purely quantitatively by specifying peaks in the amplitude or frequency spectrum." -- now this is the objective information that I crave
 
The statement is objective, but the underlying process is completely subjective in the "humans agreed on it" sense.
And they don't even agree on it, see dialects.
 
6:06 PM
It's a bit fuzzy around the edges I admit
"Ultraviolet is not in the visible spectrum". Objective or subjective? Discuss.
 
Depends on the definition? :P
Aren't people more likely to see into the infrared range? I can never remember.
 
Tetrachromats get an extra cone cell in the ultraviolet range, but apparently most ultraviolet light gets filtered out by the lens of the eye anyway
 
neat
 
6:23 PM
Oops, I misread the paragraph. The fourth cone cell would likely lie within the normal range of typical human vision.
 
it was nice while it lasted
 
I don't completely understand the explanation of the genetics involved, but it's not so much "this usually vestigial feature sometimes re-activates in modern humans" and more "the chemical process that combines pigments for cone cells ran longer than usual and now we've got a fourth combination"
And that combination must necessarily be a weighted average of the pigments, so it can't lie outside the normal boundaries that everyone else has
 
7:05 PM
@PM2Ring I'm still not sure which part needs more dexterity on a bass, the frets or the strings
 
7:49 PM
I have a question: Is there a way to set the line spacing for a dataframe? I'm exporting a dataframe into a word table and I was wondering if there's a way of setting the line-spacing between the rows of the word table?
 
8:13 PM
Check the documentation for whatever function that exports to word
 
 
1 hour later…
9:34 PM
@Cristian What are you using now? Before it was win32 and I suggested pandas, but I also didn't think it would fit your use-case
It would fit for filtering, not for writing to Word
 
9:46 PM
@roganjosh I ended up using pandas, and export the dataframe directly into word
It works great. The only thing I would like to add is to change the spacing between the rows of the word table and make it smaller...You have any suggestions?@roganjosh
 
I don't sorry. I'm surprised it even works tbh
 
I was surpeised too. Thanks!
 
I vaguely know it has to_html 'n' stuff. Anything that I don't need to pass off to pandas (SQL queries, HTML tables, etc...) I really don't. Interesting to know this worked, though :)
 

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