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9:33 AM
I am getting a bit stuck with some silly physics puzzle to solve. Too long without doing any of this. This is the problem: Say I have a set of points (close enough to each other, a discretization of a continuous path) in 2D, in an arbitrary path around the plane. Given a max speed and a max acceleration, can I get the minimum time at each point? Boundary conditions can be assumed to be zero I guess
I first naively did equations of uniform acceleration, but this does not account for 180 degree turns etc.
I was thinking on doing a fit to the path and the taking derivatives, perhaps? is that the easiest way?
 
Are you interested in a numerical or an analytic solution?
 
a roughs hand wave approximation also works for me right now to be honest XD
so, whichever is easiest
 
Uh well I'd just simulate & optimize then, yes:)
but it doesn't look easy
 
I was thinking there must be some sort of semi-direct solution no? or am I missing something? for a line, this would be: accelerate as fast as possible with max acc, until max speed, then slow down as fast as possible. This method doesn't work in 2D because of turns and 180 degrees flips
 
9:48 AM
I was wondering whether there is some kind of spline or so that somehow "naturally" solves this problem
 
yeah, maybe thats the way indeed
 
so I'm just thinking out loud, if you can define any acceleration (within the bound), this means the velocity is continuous
then I'd expect that the optimal path (without thinking about the velocity yet) must be a C1 curve
so if you use a C1 spline for the path (without considering any time component yet) you might get close to an optimal solution
 
Just to be clear: I have the path (well, a set of points), just want to know the time it takes given constraints, not entirely sure optimization comes into play here. Perhaps yes, its optimization of acceleration/velocity I guess
 
I'd expect it heavily depends on the behaviour beteen the points, doesn't it?
 
yes but we can assume they are very close together, its not just some endpoints
but I think you are still right
my issue with the spline option is: I can get a spline fitted, then take derivatives, so I can get a path wrt to some unit of timet. But how do I make this include the cosntraints? I can scale everything down to the unit of time t that makes my constraints valid everytwhere, but that would make it quite unoptimal, I assume
Maybe I need to go the other way around: find the directional vector of the acceleration that I need in each point, then get velocity->time ?
 
10:04 AM
right
what I have previously successfully used for constrained (gradient-based) optimization problems was proceedings.neurips.cc/paper/1987/file/…
 
how would you pose this problem as a optimization problem?

min_t \sum t(x) s.t. x'<maxV, x''<maxA
?
 
yes something like that
I'm having trouble thinking of a good way to impose the path of going exactly through the given points, other than just approximating a path with splines and using the path as fixed nodes
but even then I'm not sure how to deal with the velocity/acceleration
 
10:24 AM
@AnderBiguri sounds hard
At least you can have a very rough minimum from just considering path length, as you said from constant max acceleration/deceleration at the ends.
 
I mean going the splines route, I think you'd have to optimize two splines as a path X(r) = (x(r),v(r)) and simultaneously optimize the parametrization time -> spline parameter, e.g. r(t) (i.e. position at time t is X(r(t)))
but for r(t) it is not even clear a priori where the end is, so I guess that is hard too
 
So far I did a think where I use your typical equations of linear motion with uniform acceleration assumed, and fitted every point as:
1) how fast is v2 do I go from p1 to p2 with max acceleration and v1 initial speed
2) constraint that v2 to vmax
3) recompute real acceleration
4) Compute t2

This mostly works except from sharp turns.
 
My hunch is the best parametrization is speed vs distance (natural parametrization or whatever)
Then speed is tangential and you need to compute centripetal acceleration from curvature
I mean you always have to do this, but I wonder about the best parametrization
 
@AndrasDeak--СлаваУкраїні that means speed that maps the distance (1d) to a speed vector (2d)?
 
Speed magnitude, 1d. Guaranteed to point along tangent.
 
10:39 AM
so you assume the path is fixed?
 
yes
Sounds like we have a clear path
> (close enough to each other, a discretization of a continuous path)
Only loose parameter is a(d)
 
well it depends, if we do have a 3-point segment that makes close to an 180° turn, as @AnderBiguri insinuated, then it is not so clear:)
 
No, sharp turns are an issue due to centripetal acceleration
Constant speed still gives you large acceleration in a sharp turn
 
Yeah I was also even thinkin gof trying to catch this points manually, set them as special valued points, if that fixes the issue
 
that's cheating!
 
10:43 AM
What we are saying then is that we need C2 distance, C1 velocity, so we can put constraints in acceleration?
 
Physics says you need C1 velocity :P
 
haha yes, I just need an approximation now to give to an insistent colleage XD
so damned be physics!
:D
All this is annoying, I said "I will do this, this seems like a high school physics problem"
 
lol, rip
You could do some backtracking
Maybe not... hard to say how much you have to back up when you enter a corner too fast
 
so, find the point where acceleration went bananas, reduce it, and backtrack point by point until everything is fine
maybe I can hack that in 30 mins, check if it gives me a good enough approximation
 
maybe going back to a previouis idea: If you again add variable points in your path between the fixed points (so you get at polygon), and furthermore also add the "time" as a variable for each segment, then you could do a straightforward constrained optimization?
(assuming a constant speed for each tiny segment)
 
10:56 AM
<have a meeting, will be back to revise these ideas>
 
11:11 AM
@AnderBiguri but you have 2 params: how far to go back vs how much to decelerate
Of course you don't need global minimum...
Hmmmm
What if you compute max speed allowed in each point? Sounds helpful.
Then you know your wiggle room point by point
Something something find minimum peaks
 
11:32 AM
@AndrasDeak--СлаваУкраїні how do I do this? Isn't this related to the acceleration?
@flawr im not sure I follow here... :)
 
11:52 AM
@AnderBiguri yes, a_{cp} = v^2/r
 
humm? I am not sure I follow your logic of max speed allowed. Allowed by what, the max acceleration?
 
Yup
You know how fast you can make a turn of given radius to stay below max acceleration
 
that seems useful ( ;) )
 
And if you go slower you can have tangential acceleration as sqrt(limit^2 - a_cp^2)
 
that may be the thing indeed. Combined with my previous stuff, this may solve it
 
12:07 PM
@AnderBiguri I was just thinking about discretizing the paths between the nodes that way, and consider these points as free parameters that we can optimize
 
But the paths are quite discretized, as in, I have maybe 300 points with only few corners, most of it is continous quite smoot curves actually
 
 
2 hours later…
1:54 PM
Funny how really complex problems can look trivial on the outside.
 
@AnderBiguri so just to come back to the approach I proposed: In that case you would have considered the path polygon fixed, and you would just have optimized a sequence of time steps (one per segment)
then you can try to minimize the sum of these, under the condition that you do not exceed the specified velocity and acceleration bounds
 
I don't really get it still, I think. What are these polygons? What about these polygons get optimized?
 
so let say the we only consider the given points as our polygonal path
and we don't optimize it
but now lets assign a time duration for each segment
this means we now can compute a velocity for each segment, and an acceleration
so we can view the vector of acceleration and velocities as a function of the vector of time durations
does that make sense so far?
 
I think I need a step back. "polygonal path" -> path of linearly connected points?
 
right
this is what we have as input, right?
 
2:06 PM
yes
but assigning a time duration for each segment is the goal, I guess
 
right
 
I think I follow your last paragraph yes
 
so my idea would have been optimizing the value this vector of time durations
that is, minimize the sum of all time durations, under the constraints of the accelerations and velocities
 
something like what we were saying before: min_t \sum t(x) s.t. x'<maxV, x''<maxA
right?
 
right
 
2:12 PM
but I see the principle, but not entirely sure what to do from here. That t(x) is a bit vague
 
so as the path is discretized into let's say N points
we have N-1 linear segments
so here we'd have a vector of N-1 timesteps
so we could minimize the sum over all t[k] k=1,...,N-1
 
but the length of the segment must be a variable here somewhere
 
I understood the length is defined by the the two endpoints?
 
two endpoints of each segment yes. They are not necessarily the same length
I guess I could reinterpolate the curve to make them same length actually, not an issue
 
ah no that is not necessary
let's say x[k] is the k-th point (2d)
then we can say the velocity vector of segment k is v[k] = (x[k+1]-x[k])/t[k]
similarly we can also define the acceleration at each point using central differences
 
2:34 PM
I see. And then optimize how?
 
with the one I linked for example, or any other optimizer that can deal with nonlinear constraints:
5 hours ago, by flawr
what I have previously successfully used for constrained (gradient-based) optimization problems was https://proceedings.neurips.cc/paper/1987/file/a87ff679a2f3e71d9181a67b7542122c-Paper.pdf
 
coolcool that makes sense
I'll try to find some time later to try both yours and Andras suggestiosn
thanks both enormously <3
 
 
2 hours later…
4:49 PM
posted on November 28, 2023 by Sivylla Paraskevopoulou

Visual inspection is the image-based inspection of parts where a camera scans the part under test for failures and quality defects. By using deep deep learning and computer vision techniques,... read more >>

 

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