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6:26 AM
posted on June 27, 2022 by Cris Luengo

The median filter is a non-liner smoothing (blurring) filter where an output pixel is the median value of its neighborhood in the input image. It can be generalized to a percentile filter, where the median is the 50th percentile. Noisy “trui” image filtered with a percentile filter, from left …

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4 hours later…
10:11 AM
@Feeds Don't let @flawr know that this dismisses the difference between maximum and supremum as "just a technicality" :-P
 
10:22 AM
hehehehe
 
 
2 hours later…
12:06 PM
@LuisMendo He already confessed that this stuff only woks with finite inputs
 
noob, finite dimensional image analyis
 
@flawr So it's not a technicality; they are the same
 
No, I'm pretty sure he's just future proofing for the case he ever starts to support infinite images.
(@CrisLuengo excellent post btw!)
 
@flawr and filters with infinite kernels too :-)
Yeah, great post. The fun was just too easy to let go
 
@LuisMendo uncountable, preferrably:)
 
12:38 PM
ℵ1 kernels
 
1:28 PM
@flawr Thanks!
@LuisMendo Thanks!
@LuisMendo It’s a technicality because it matters in the continuous-domain theory that I have in my head when I reason about this stuff, but then becomes irrelevant when you implement the stuff in a machine, to work on samples and discretized data.
Also, I didn’t make fun of the paper with the bad figures and incomprehensible code! :D
 
Ah the vacant statement, because there was only a paper with nice code and beautiful plots:P
 
 
2 hours later…
3:57 PM
@CrisLuengo Ah, it makes sense now :-)
I like "Because computing the median is a non-linear operation, we cannot use the Fourier transform to aid us". It so neatly summarizes that these filters are a different thing, at least conceptually. In my head, "filter" is synonymous with "impulse response (kernel, mask) you convolve the input with". I'd be happier if these filters would not be called "filters" at all. But that's what everybody calls them
*were not called
 
4:16 PM
@LuisMendo It's a non-linear filter. There are way more non-linear filters than linear filters. The image processing literature is full of them. I don't see why it's not a filter if it's not a convolution, but I guess everyone has their own, slightly different, definition for most words.
To me, filter = something that modifies the image.
Especially if said modification involves removing specific features in the image.
I've always focused a lot on Mathematical Morphology, which is as non-linear as it gets. So the non-linearity doesn't scare me at all. :)
 
@CrisLuengo I admit my association "filter = convolution" may be somewhat arbitrary, but not completely. A filter can be seen in the frequency doman as filtering (selecting) frequencies, that is, attenuating some frequencies more than others. The concept of frequency implies Fourier, thus linearity/convolution
 
@LuisMendo Yes, I understand your association. It's not weird at all. I just think you can filter other things than frequencies. :)
 
4:37 PM
The Fourier transform is strong with this one. Or rather, this is the way.
 
May Fourier be with you
 
@flawr Which of the two words for convolution is more common in German (in the mathematical context)?
 
@LuisMendo In maths definitely "Faltung"
but when it comes to machine learning then I guess most people just use the english "convolution", and I wouldn't even be surprized if there were many people in that field who didn't understand "Faltung".
but it's funny how "convolution" basically means to "roll/wind up", while "Faltung" is the noun for "falten" (fold/crease)
it'd be interesting to know where that discrepancy comes form
 
5:16 PM
^ :-D
@flawr Maybe they are not so discrepant: etymonline.com/word/….
Both have the idea of rolling / folding
Ah, you also said that, sorry
So, aren't "roll" and "fold" similar to you?
 
6:14 PM
They are opposites, aren't they? :)
 
6:44 PM
@AnderBiguri vim9 is out, maybe worth giving it a go now?:) vim.org/vim90.php
 
@flawr I think "roll" can mean roll into a flat shape, or roll into a tube shape. The latter is what I'm thinking of, and it's a bit like a continuous version of folding
 
I like the idea of one being the discrete and the other the continuous version:)
rolling somehow also incorporates the notion of periodicity
 
 
3 hours later…
10:18 PM
@LuisMendo I've seen a guitar amp with (among other controls) three "volume" knobs: "volume", "overdrive level", "master". So far I had the impression that they usually have at most two controls (a "volume" or gain that controls how much signal goes into the amplification stage, possibly overdriving it, and an output/level that determines how loud the sound actually is in the end), is there a reason we have three and not only two controls?
 
@flawr With three controls you can make it much louder than with two, can't you? This is obvious. Why would you use put in only two controls if you can put in three and have a louder amp?
 
But they didn't even go to 11!
 
10:43 PM
Classic mistake!
 

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