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11:21 AM
@LuisMendo oh definitely!
 
12:09 PM
Let's consider a gaussian blurring filter. For each output pixel we basically compute a weighted sum of the inputs. What if we replace the summing operation by a maximum?
Isn't that the same as a gray-scale dilation (maybe modulo some scaling factor and flipping)
ah no it's not the same, in grayscale dilation we add values of the image and of the kernel, while in this thing I was talking about we'd multiply them.
 
12:23 PM
@flawr isn't that max pooling?
not exactly, because that gives you a smaller output if I understand correctly
so if there's a median filter, that would just be a max filter
 
12:42 PM
maybe you coudl say a weighted max filter?
I think max pooling is usually not associated with weights
 
1:02 PM
it looks kinda funny:
so does it if you use the median instead:
 
@flawr "weighted max"?
 
right?
 
How do you weight a max?
 
max(42*x, -5*y, 666*z) instead of max(x, y, z)
I mean just like the weighted sum but you replace the sum with a max?
 
That's silly
 
1:13 PM
probably the reason nobody uses it:P
but the advantage is, the pictures looks silly too
then again, if you replace sums with a maximum, and products with sums you get tropical algebra/geometry
which is a thing
 
@flawr It does look like a dilation, but it’s not, because you don’t have all the cool properties that the dilation has. But maybe there are other cool properties with this new operator?
(Max,+)-convolutions are awesome. And you just need a logarithmic mapping to compare with (sum,*)-convolutions.
 
aren't (max,+) convolutions the same as dilations then?
 
2:02 PM
Yes, they are. That’s why I bring them up.
And that’s why I like them so much.
 
:)
 
I once attended a seminar on tropical geometry at a mathematical morphology conference. They had invited this prominent tropical geometry guy to give a plenary talk, and he didn’t understand why he was invited until he saw some of the other presentations at the conference.
And I just looked over the tropical geometry page on Wikipedia, and see no mention at all of dilations and erosions or mathematical morphology.
It always baffles me when two essentially identical fields are totally not interrelated and not learning from each other.
 
a case of mathematicians who are afraid of applications
 
LOL!
 
2:25 PM
the only place where I've actually heard about tropical geometry was in a course about algebraic statistics, maybe these guys just don't know about morphology
or vice versa
or don't care
 
3:11 PM
never heard of tropical geometry other than "shaped like a pineapple"
 
 
2 hours later…
5:16 PM
That field deserves a better name
> The adjective tropical in the name of the area was coined by French mathematicians in honor of the Hungarian-born Brazilian computer scientist Imre Simon, who wrote on the field
 
that's... dumb
 
 
1 hour later…
6:29 PM
It is. And there's a similar case, also in maths (and probably others I don't know about): Polish space
> Polish spaces are so named because they were first extensively studied by Polish topologists and logicians—Sierpiński, Kuratowski, Tarski and others
But tropical geometry somehow sounds even dumber than Brazilian geometry would have
 
yeah, with Brazilian it's at least clear what it's supposed to mean
 
 
2 hours later…
8:15 PM
I mean, there are also the monte carlo methods, or the chinese remainder theorem
the manhattan- and the SNCF metrics
the arctic circle theorem
all these have not much to do with the actual places as far as I know:)
 
but they are specific entities rather than whole fields
and Monte Carlo and Manhattan at least have to do with the cities themselves rather than "the guy who wrote some papers is from there"
 
@flawr With Monte Carlo it's different. It's named after the place, but not arbitrarily because someone was from there. It's because randomness is associated to casinos, and there's one there
Same with Manhattan. The shape (regular blocks) of that part of the city
What Andras said :-)
 
So you guys would have prefered Euler-geometry? :P
yeah sure but I don't think its really a bad thing. Most things in maths are named after some guys, but really you could use any name or word
 
"it's a dumb name" is not a statement that can be evaluated in terms of a mathematical framework
 
many times things are even named in honour of some other mathematician that maybe didn't even directly had something to do with that.
 
8:28 PM
"you could use any name or word": yeah, sure, so why not use a name that's not dumb?
 
I really think in the context of the different ways of how things are named it could be worse:)
 
"it could be worse": yeah, sure, but it could've also been a lot better
you might notice that you won't be able to convince me that it's not a dumb name, since it's a dumb name :P
 
pulls out the hungarian algorithm
 
Hungarian method! At least here...
Wife had to take some operations research courses where they taught it to her. In Hungarian it's a bit confusing because from the name you'd think it's "Magyar-módszer" named after a person named Magyar, but instead it's "magyar módszer", with Hungarian as an adjective.
 
Reminds me of noetherian and abelian that are one of the few exceptions where you the name-derived adjectives are lower case.
huh, apparently the french are to blame for that
 
8:39 PM
I'd be bothered by Brazilian geometry a bit less, and by Brazilian method not at all. It really is a combination of multiple frown-inducing features: 1. using multiple indirection via field -> person -> country -> "tropical", and 2. naming a field after a person in such a way, even though people don't have monopolies on fields
@flawr just like "tropical geometry"; coincidence?
 
they compensate by writing SNCF all uppercase
 
dunno what that is
 
the french railways
 
(the sncf metric is an induced metric with a distinguished point, so you define it as d'(x, y) := d(x, p) +d(p, y), similar to the railway network in france where you always had to go via paris)
 
8:44 PM
hmm
we've had the same railway topology since WWI
I have a strong suspicion that Steiner's theorem for the moment of inertia is that or close enough
 

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