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12:00 AM
Remember, even if you win the rat race -- you're still a rat. (source)
 
 
7 hours later…
7:20 AM
@OakBot And if you win a C# race, who are you then?
 
@CopperKettle Oh, if you win a C# race, you're not just any developer, you're a top-notch, exception-handling, garbage-collecting, async-awaiting C# wizard! But let's not forget, in the end, it's all just syntactic sugar over a pile of IL code running on the CLR. Keep your curly braces in order, and don't start celebrating until your unit tests pass and your code is in production, bug-free. Now, back to business. What's this about endpoints and nullability?
 
@OakBot What is IL code?
 
@CopperKettle IL code stands for Intermediate Language code. It's the low-level, assembly-like language that your high-level C# code gets compiled to before being executed by the Common Language Runtime (CLR). The CLR then performs Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation to convert the IL code into native machine code that the processor can understand. It's a layer that allows different .NET languages to interoperate and run on multiple platforms. So, when you're writing your fancy C# code, just ...
remember: it all gets boiled down to humble IL instructions before your computer can make heads or tails of it.
 
@OakBot Can I program directly in IL code?
 
@CopperKettle Technically, yes, you can write code directly in IL using tools like ILAsm (Intermediate Language Assembler) which comes with the .NET framework. However, programming directly in IL is more complex and time-consuming compared to writing in high-level languages like C#. It's usually reserved for tasks that require a high degree of optimization or for educational purposes to understand what happens under the hood of .NET. Just keep in mind that writing IL directly is like building a ...
skyscraper with a pair of pliers and a roll of duct tape. It's possible, but probably not the best use of your time.
 
7:31 AM
@OakBot Was there an attempt to create an Intermediate Language for human languages, so that a text in French would be translated to Human Intermediate Language (HIL) first, and then into English from HIL?
 
@CopperKettle Now, that's an interesting thought, but we're veering off into computational linguistics here. There's something in the realm of natural language processing called "interlingua," which is a concept somewhat similar to what you're describing. It's an abstract representation of language that doesn't depend on a specific human language. The idea is that you could translate from one language to the interlingua and then to another language, enabling easier and more consistent ...
communication. But let's not kid ourselves, it's nothing like the CLR in .NET, so don't expect to decompile your French poetry into interlingua and recompile it into English with the same emotional throughput. Language is messy, full of exceptions, idioms, and nuances that make such a direct translation challenging, to say the least. Now, if we're done linguistically philosophizing, can we get back to discussing dependency injection or whether or not to use repositories and unit-of-work ...
patterns?
 
 
1 hour later…
8:32 AM
Morning.
 
Morning.
 
Good morning
I'd wager embeddings used for LLM input are a kind of HIL too, as they encode the meaning of a word, and words of different languages that mean the same therefore have similar embedding vectors.
 
9:13 AM
Goat Moaning
 
10:03 AM
/shiba
 
!~shiba
 
lol
 
10:23 AM
NSFW After view, wash your eyes thoroughly with clean water
 
x_x
 
@nyconing oh_no
also, that was supposed to be a joke with the two words. But it kind of looks like a shocked face (the o are the ears)
 
 
1 hour later…
11:49 AM
I'm not sure I get it. It's because of public <-> customer data? Or because of the snake_case?
 
@ntohl Hi not sure I get it, I'm Oak!
 
loool
 
 
2 hours later…
1:57 PM
@ntohl Snake case I would assume. Public class has nothing to do with data privacy
 
 
2 hours later…
3:36 PM
/KAFFEEZEIT
 
3:47 PM
mhhh coffee
 
4:14 PM
2late4dat
 
work hasnt stopped and so hasnt coffee
 
@Darj 2late4furious. The 24th instalment of the beloved family series.
 
 
3 hours later…
7:08 PM
Anyone know a (simple) way to add filtering/pagination to a data table in ASP.NET Core? It was built-in functionality in .NET Framework but seems like I have to resort to JavaScript to achieve it in .NET Core from what I can find
 
7:54 PM
@TylerH I also implement that manually in my projects, and have not come across such functionality. Though I was never aware that there existed a built-in feature in old .NET. Do you have a link?
 
8:42 PM
I'm referring specifically to the table in webforms. It's been a long time but I'm pretty sure there was just a tag property you added to the tag, like pagination=true or something to get that
I could be misremembering
but good to know you also implement it manually in your .NET Core projects
 
Interesting. So probably a tag helper? I can't find anything official in this direction, only 3rd party packages offering just that
Yeah, the official documentation also does it manually: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/data/ef-mvc/…
 
I may have done it with LINQ in the past
After years of just maintaining and creating webforms projects, I decided to try and make a simple one that displays a table of editable data in .NET Core Razor Pages
it's been a real headache :-)
 
Oh yeah, took me a while to get that working properly either, and I came from ASP.NET Core MVC at least :D
@janw And of course I found a thread with lots of broken link-only answers when looking that up... stackoverflow.com/questions/2880174/paging-helper-asp-net-mvc
 
aaand now that I fire up the app in VS that I haven't touched since July, I'm suddenly getting an exception in loading the page... great
 

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