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5:25 AM
@GaryOak you're doing it again and you know it. You're welcome to participate in on-topic discussions here in a constructive way. Keep your noise elsewhere. Before you type think hard if what you're about to say contributes anything of value here, and if in doubt, just don't post your message.
 
9 hours later…
2:05 PM
class parent:
    child = None
    def __init__(self, type):
        if type == 1:
            child = childType1()
         else:
            child = childType1()

      def doSomething(self):
          child.do()
class childType1:
    def __init__(self):
         pass
    def foo(self):
        print("child1 foo")
class childType2:
    def __init__(self):
         pass
    def bar(self):
        print("child2 bar")
I am looking for a way that when you call parent.doSomething, it is either foo or bar that gets called depending on what type of child got instantiated in the parent's constructor
Is there some automatic way of doing this in Python?
2:20 PM
Usually both child types would have a method of the same name, and parent would just get an instance of either type and call that method.
class childType1:
    def foo(self):
        print("child1 foo")
    def do(self):
        self.foo()
class childType2:
    def bar(self):
        print("child1 foo")
    def do(self):
        self.bar()
2:47 PM
@matszwecja Interesting approach! Thanks
 
5 hours later…
8:18 PM
I have an asyncio.Task that's writing data to a file. I want to cancel the task and delete the file. After calling task.cancel(), how do I wait until it's actually stopped running (and closed the file)?
I would assume by awaiting it?
I don't really do asyncio stuff, but.
Hmm. I was worried that that might return immediately, but the more I think about it, it does seem like it the way to do it
Since technically the task could catch the CancelledError and just carry on working, awaiting it should do the right thing
8:36 PM
I actually ran into this discussion point repeatedly today (on Windows)
2 days ago, by Peilonrayz
Ok yeah the problem is likely Windows schedules the file IO and you're just going too fast. If you don't want the retry loop; I would always leave file.tmp.txt open and use seek(0) truncate() and write(open("file.txt").read()). Basically doing the rewrite in Python. But IMO either is 'fine'.
I now don't know how to trust serial execution for this kind of thing, since it would tell me the file is locked even though everything was in a with block and there was a "substantial" amount of work between each opening in append mode. I wouldn't be surprised if you couldn't make your await bullet-proof for Windows
(well, you could, with iron cladding)
@roganjosh I thought the rest of the conversation implies my extrapolation is wrong.
It seems not (at least from my anecdotal experience today. I was streaming a huge, malformed file, parsing it in batches of 10k lines, and dumping it back out into another file. The PermissionError would just appear randomly on batch N in one run, and then M in another... and it happened with higher frequency when the number of columns (or amount of work needed) was reduced with the fixed batch size. Increasing the parsing effort in each loop eliminated it
Basically, for the 2 column file, I bumped it to batches of 100k rows and the issue was gone
8:52 PM
Oh
It's only anecdotal as I find it hard to believe that there isn't some signal back from the OS before the serial code keeps going, but it happened at least 5 times for me (meaning I had to start all over again <grumble grumble>)
@Aran-Fey careful that awaiting the task will propagate the CancelledError. The "proper" way to wait for completion is to have an event, even if that means registering event.set as a callback on the task.
I found a new noob-level misunderstanding on my part today, if someone can shed any light:
with open('test_file.txt', 'w') as outfile:
    outfile.write('something\n')
    outfile.write('\n')
    outfile.write('something else\n')

with open('test_file.txt') as infile:
    while True:
        try:
            new_line = next(infile)
            print(repr(new_line))
            if repr(new_line) == '\n':
                print('FOUND')
        except Exception:
            break
I can see repr() of the newline there, but it never matches. The str() value does, though
@MisterMiyagi The done_callback is executed even if the task is cancelled?
@roganjosh repr("\n") are two characters \ and n, not one character \n.
@Aran-Fey Yeah. You can find a more complex setup here, which uses a callback that even inspects the task status after being done.
9:11 PM
Interesting... print(''.join(['\\', 'n']) == '\n') that wouldn't have occurred to me
Thanks :)
9:23 PM
The is even more "fun"... print(''.join(['\\', 'n'])); print(''.join(['\\', 'n']) == repr('\n'))
9:39 PM
Ok, and so lies the issue I was facing today with the abominable file. print(str(''.join(['\\', 'n'])) == '\n'); print(str('\n') == '\n'). This is horrendous to reason about when you can only see printouts. Is there a cheat to know which of those \n I'm working with?
What two \n are you working with? "\\n" and "\n"
@roganjosh repr fixes everything if you repr everything.
str is a lie!
@Peilonrayz I might need to put this on the backburner until I'm back at my work laptop because I've got myself thoroughly confused about the hours I spent debugging today and this kind of behaviour
@MisterMiyagi I think I hit every broken permutation of check you could make until I got something working. I'm a complex character.

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