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2:07 AM
@roganjosh I don't consent to discussions being moved to python-canon-discussion, in any case Karl mentioned leaving. In any case half the discussion (as often) was not "which canonical?" but "what is the OP's question's actual intent here?", which we still don't know. I think the ignored lesson was for people to not go hamstering for which canonical, but to firmly push back on an unclear OP to clarify "I am confused" into "I wrote X, I expect behavior Y". Without that the question's unclear
2:27 AM
garbage question that was suspected as a duplicate, but is nowhere near a MRE stackoverflow.com/questions/47978601
@PM2Ring You assumed I just wanted a cmp() to do sorting, I actually needed to explicitly inspect the return value of cmp() (e.g. to do something special when I find a duplicate). By the way there are still use-cases where it makes life easier to use cmp() not key, such as mixed-order e.g. "name by reverse-alphabetical order, zipcode by numeric increasing"
@KarlKnechtel after skimming it, unclear what the OP's problem was...
2:57 AM
nth low quality dupe, was closed as needing debugging details (no roomba: accepted answer) stackoverflow.com/questions/36386874
3:41 AM
i have faced a problem , where when i read a file in normal string format and then trying to get the number of bytes in that file , and compare it with when i read same file in binary format i got difference in the byte count . adding code below

>>> bc_1 = 0
>>> bc_2 = 0
>>> file = 'test.txt'
>>>
>>> with open(file, 'r') as f:
... for l in f:
... bc_1 += len(l.encode('utf-8'))
...
>>> with open(file, 'rb') as f:
... for i in f:
... bc_2 += len(i)
...
>>> bc_1
335045
4:17 AM
Opening a file in text mode doesn't only apply an encoding, it translates newline sequences. Also, open(file, 'r') will use the platform default encoding, not necessarily UTF-8. The UTF-8 representation of the text doesn't necessarily use the same number of bytes as the original representation (assuming, for the moment, that the platform default encoding is even appropriate for the file).
If you are trying to read data as text, and then care about the number of bytes rather than the number of characters, then you are, algorithmically, fundamentally, doing something wrong.
(Unless you're specifically re-encoding the text for some other purpose outside your program, maybe)
 
4 hours later…
8:45 AM
@KarlKnechtel Looking at their issue description and comparing their working/broken code variants, I'm 99% sure their problem is line-buffering on stdout. A dupe on needing to flush when writing without newline should be appropriate.
 
1 hour later…
10:01 AM
Ah, yes, I see the print("number: ",end="").
I see two close votes anyway but feel free to hammer that. We have stackoverflow.com/questions/25897335 for this.
From the makers of "web scrapping", a new installment: "praising HTML"
@KarlKnechtel TY for the dupe, hammered
@Aran-Fey if only they praised JSON instead.
@MisterMiyagi in retrospect, I feel a bit bad about almost entirely rewriting the answer; but then it was community wiki
there are also more technical (and much more popular) discussions of the flush concept itself: stackoverflow.com/questions/230751 stackoverflow.com/questions/107705
 
2 hours later…
12:20 PM
@KarlKnechtel yes i was wrong here in this part where i have to read the file as text.
i was trying to mimic `wc` command in python. this is where i got this issue. problem is solved now as i going with `rb` mode and with `r` value might change according to my locale value.
12:49 PM
@smci Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that cmp() is only useful in sorting. OTOH, that is its most common use, but it's certainly also useful when you need to determine the ordering of some elements without performing a full sort.
FWIW, the key function technique is sometimes known as the Schwartzian transform. It's almost always cheaper than using a cmp function because cmp has to do its thing with both args on every comparison. I concede that cmp can be faster for de-duping, since it can bail out as soon as it detects a mismatch. OTOH, it may be cheaper to de-dupe using a key function that returns a hash of the items.
BTW, it's often possible to do mixed-order sorts in one pass with a simple key function, eg stackoverflow.com/a/36090228/4014959
1:31 PM
This rooms is great. I probably never would have thought about whether a cmp function may relate to the kernel trick without the stuff that is being discussed here...
2:10 PM
@smci I will consider if and how that can be handled better in the future since the initial move then left a large chunk of disembodied discussion that wasn't possible for me to move back once I started. However, such a move shouldn't be seen as punitive like a move to Ouro would be; the discussion is preserved (in its whole) so I apologise if you're not happy with the move
In retrospect, the status quo was probably the best move. Apologies
 
4 hours later…
5:59 PM
@PM2Ring I didn't say I wanted to de-dupe, either. I only said an explicit three-valued cmp() made it easier to do something special on duplicates (e.g. print a message, count them, mark them, etc.) You couldn't use a hash key to do the three-way comparison. I see your comments about big-O efficiency but let's say my N is small and I care more about simple clear code.
6:13 PM
@roganjosh Uhuh. IMO there are multiple phases of dealing with an OP, especially a new-user: go back-and-forth with the OP to clarify their expectation, intent, use-case, (what other language are they migrating from/comparing to?) criteria (e.g. define "better"/"efficient"), make sure they provided working MCVE etc. Let us not jump to the next part before doing that.
6:48 PM
@PM2Ring No, I specifically cited you an example that can't be done with a key function (without losing legibility, at least): "name by reverse-alphabetical order, zipcode by numeric increasing". It's easy to negate numbers, not alphabeticals, that's precisely why I cited you that. (sure you could use chr() and negate it, but that loses legibility)
6:59 PM
Don't wanna lose too much legibility, otherwise dyslexic cops will show up and arrest you
Seriously, though.
(I don't know what we're talking about, I just saw an opportunity for a joke)
 
3 hours later…
9:36 PM
@smci You just negate the zipcode and set reverse=True. But sure, if you have 2 non-numeric keys that trick can't be done without severely compromising legibility.
@smci A few days ago, you (& a few others) were talking about the misconceptions of newbies regarding Python variables. You mentioned that they may have those misconceptions because they were coming from Java (or similar). That was certainly valid a while ago, but Python has been taught as a first language in a lot of places for several years now.
However, a lot of those Python teachers are new to Python, and they were probably teaching Java & C family languages, until recently. So the kids may be picking up the misconceptions from the teachers. (Or from other resources that assume a Java- or C-like data model).
I've seen online learning material where the teacher's explanation of Python variables was a bit murky. He might understand the Python model, but he was still explaining Python variables as boxes that hold values...
10:37 PM
I try saying that Python variables are baskets that have nametags. I'm not sure if it is a sufficient distinction though.

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