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1:28 AM
@smci If the OP didn't actually want to name the sublists then why do both their examples include them? Surely they tried result = [[], []] before result = [list1[], list2[]]? I certainly agree that we shouldn't edit the body so that it asks a nicer question.
@smci Naming the sublists is not a terrible idiom. Naming them list1 and list2 is silly though, and gets into "variable variables" territory if you want N sublists.
The OP didn't give much feedback on the answers. Maybe they simply gave up on the named sublists thing. Or it is an XY problem artefact. I agree that it'd be nice to have a question that does focus on making an empty list of lists, but I'd prefer a better target, without the added complication of the named sublist issue. (FWIW, I upvoted roeland's answer).
@roganjosh We already have "List of lists changes reflected across sublists unexpectedly" in the canon collection. And that's certainly a useful dupe target when you try making a list of empty lists the wrong way.
@roganjosh It does what the body of the question asks for. I'm almost tempted to post result = [list1 := [], list2 := []]
1:49 AM
@PM2Ring I see the canon as a succinct list of how-to-do-things-the-right-way (esp. for things where Python idiom is different or more powerful than other languages), not primarily as just a laundry-list of dupes to close misguided questions.
Sure, and the right way to make a list of empty lists doesn't mention named sublists.
@PM2Ring Naming the sublists absolutely is a terrible idea esp. when parameter N is not fixed. We don't need names, l = [ [] for _ in range(N) ] allows us to reference any given sublist as l[i]. That's better idiom.
@PM2Ring The OP never did need to name the sublists, they merely thought they needed to, but they didn't. They never articulated any legit reason why, so we conclude they don't have one. (The OP was a beginner in Python. (So, it would have been better if 10 yrs of answers pushed back on their misconception.)
I already agreed that it's silly when N isn't fixed. But when N is fixed, and the sublists have sensible names, then it's fine, IMHO.
"but I'd prefer a better target, without the added complication of the named sublist issue." Me too, just didn't want to be accused of rephounding if I went ahead and created it. Also the title would be a near-duplicate of "How to create a list of empty lists"
@smci Sorry, I can't read the OP's mind. I can only read what they wrote.
1:59 AM
@PM2Ring Me neither. When they think they want to do something that's bad idiom, but they can't articulate any clear need to, we can conclude that wasn't an actual requirement.
@smci An ideal target would also cover deeper nested constructions. And things like an "empty" 2D grid, where the "empty" cells are initialised to zero or the empty string.
@PM2Ring Hmm, I think the ideal canonical question would simply ask about a 1D list, be very short and as roganjosh said have good SEO. Answers could optionally add higher-dimensional stuff if they wanted.
I often create tuples of named lists. But I often don't name the outer tuple. ;) And I often zip such things into a list of tuples.
@smci That sounds good to me.
2:20 AM
Here's a line from code I'm currently working on: grid = [[0] * width for _ in range(height)]. It's important to understand why it's ok to do [0] * width in the inner lists.
3:06 AM
@smci where OP said "I tried the following, which didn't work, but I hope it demonstrates the sort of thing that I'm after:", it wasn't clear to me: did OP really only need the [[], []] result? Or was it also expected to create list1 and list2 variables for the inner lists? If so, why? And what on earth did OP mean by "complexity"?
also is it supposed to be exactly two inner lists or just what?
at the very least, the question contains noise that is supposed to be edited out.
@metatoaster but every language is like this. you have to go at least a little out of your way to write something actually dangerous in python. it's better than when the most popular languages featured undefined behaviour all over the place and expected manual memory management.
@smci I agree that the q&a should cover a 1d case specifically (unless you consider OP's case 2d, which I kinda do). The real generalization is "list of placeholder values", but that misses the caveat about [mutable_value] * n
also guys, I know I'm not intending to be around much in the future, but the python-canon-discussion room is intended pretty much for exactly this
@PM2Ring with enough explanation, it could be worth posting! on the other hand, generally my attitude is that pure how-to questions should not show nonsensical failed attempts
which, in turn, would not leave the opportunity to bring it up
3:46 AM
@KarlKnechtel Mistaking a list of string vs. string is not "danger", it's "incorrectness" and results in unsound behavior - as for that, languages like Rust is actively designed to minimize various unsound behavior, so not all languages are like that.
you misunderstand. there are a million other possible problems besides type safety
3:58 AM
I mean, the topic was about type safety
More specifically, type hinting in Python and how it works and doesn't work.
And why it's useful and necessary to disambiguate situations like preventing confusion of string vs. list of strings, and that statically typed languages that have strict typing can just eliminate that as a problem because the code wouldn't compile
Like, I agree with you there are innumerable possible problems with programming, which is why I just focus on the issues I happen to care about right now within the context of a conversation
@metatoaster *wouldn't compile due to actual type mismatch (e.g. passing a string when it expects a list of strings results in a compilation failure rather than yep that's legit too and give garbage output silently)
 
3 hours later…
AAB
AAB
7:06 AM
@roganjosh thnaks
@metatoaster I guess it really depends if you program an application or a library. I guess libraries have a greater need to think about types, whereas applications can split the world into outside/inside and have a parser inbetween and in the inside forget about types, whereas libraries need to have this parser basically in every function, because each function can be called completely out of context.
7:38 AM
@KarlKnechtel Sure, but are you saying I should edit that 8yo question? When I've done that in the past people here complain a lot. If I create a new one, it will have much worse SEO than the existing (site:stackoverflow.com How to create a list of empty lists). The OP's intent and mention of "complexity" was clearly "do this in the minimum number of assignments or lines of code". But I'm saying that they never needed to and naming the sublists was a red-herring: ...
... the sublists could be referred to as ll[0], ll[1]
@KarlKnechtel Which python-canon-discussion room? Not this room?
@PM2Ring I don't suggest editing things to be nicer. Only to be less irrelevant and misleading. There's no point in new users getting hung on the syntax for the wrong way of doing something. We should teach idiom.
7:59 AM
By the way here's a second basic but important thing I forgot and relearned this week: Python dicts now remember their insertion order, but sets don't. So set comprehensions silently ignore any insertion order as written: {p for p in [5,3,2]}. And assigning dict keys to sets and back again loses their order. ...
... One way to avoid the pitfall is to explicitly tell new users that a set is conceptually similar to a dict with no values except that key order is not respected; and it has a different implementation to dict. You cannot create an OrderedSet, so when you create a set or dict, you have to intentionally think about its use case: whether fast membership test is more important than preserving insertion order.
8:14 AM
...if both are important, you eventually end up flipping between set and dict, while having to fix up key order.
8:38 AM
@smci You don't get to change the intent of a question to make it into the question that you wish the OP asked. You claim that the named sublists are a red herring. I claim that they're a significant component of the question. OTOH, the OP accepted an answer without named sublists, and it's likely that they didn't understand how assignment / name binding works in Python (take a look at their only other Python question).
However, if we did remove the named sublist stuff it wouldn't invalidate any of the existing answers (only Wim's comment, which can be flagged for deletion). Still, I'm very hesitant to make such a drastic change. And such a change shouldn't be made without discussing it first on MSO.
@smci Here's an old demo I did of set order instability. stackoverflow.com/a/51578541/4014959
@smci The difference in set & dict membership testing speed is insignificant. The speed of dict item insertion is marginally slower, since it has to store the value, and the key storage is slightly more complicated, to allow for insertion order preservation. If you just need membership & insertion order preservation, you can make a dict with values of None, but of course that doesn't have all the set operations.
 
2 hours later…
10:18 AM
@smci this one. A while back I asked if intense discussions about canon could be moved there. It's certainly not out of scope for this room occasionally but it was becoming a daily event because Karl is rather keen on this thing :) So, that room is dedicated to it
 
1 hour later…
11:41 AM
@Hakaishin More or less this, though I would argue even inside there are benefits to constrain this more, e.g. via the functional core/imperative shell pattern, but that's an other can of worms beyond what I am willing to get into here
But yes, if you can't tell already I write libraries. A lot of them.
@metatoaster Never heard of core/imperative, but a quick glance at it tells me that is how I architect my systems and how our system works in general. It's a nice pattern
Well, it has certain constrains on what the core does, generally it's derived from functional programming principals
12:13 PM
Feb 2, 2019 at 18:32, by PM 2Ring
Similarly, functionality that gathers raw data, validates it, and converts it to the appropriate datatype, is the outer perimeter of your program. Once data has been properly dealt with by your "data guards" then the rest of your program should assume that it's safe, and has the correct datatype.
nice :P
1:11 PM
Seeing OpenTelemetry for Azure isn't finished yet, should I use it? Anyone had any unsolvable issues with it (with DRF or FastAPI microservices)?
2:01 PM

python-canon-discussion

THIS ROOM IS NOT FOR PYTHON HELP. You want the main Python room:
 
4 hours later…
5:53 PM
@Aran-Fey I considered getting around to reading up on this just now and I note that they never said python wrote the string. My response was just instinctive and it paid off - I think all sorts of tools add newlines by default.
Bold of you to assume they know more than one programming language! ;P
Loggers, for example, or any other programming language. A hidden newline is just a default go-to :P
It's certainly a reasonable assumption to make
Even git has problems without the newline
Doubly so if you already know that the text changed somehow
6:00 PM
Actually, lol, I think I've completely misinterpreted git's complaint all this time
Although I could swear that there is some linter that gets upset if I don't have a blank line at the end of my file... hmm
Imagine using such a low-level programming language that you have to care about whether the file ends with a trailing newline or not >_>
Javascript would probably read it as int(0) as an exit code :P
</shade>
Well, I'm not going mad, at least on this point; it stands to reason that "things" will naturally just write newlines
They just ignore the last line if they see an EOF? That's some top-tier programming right there
6:17 PM
I guess there's no way to adequately program a mic-drop, so it's just assumed and not interpreted. If you weren't done, it wouldn't be an EOF

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