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2:03 AM
> it does not involve Rust yet
2
 
 
6 hours later…
7:56 AM
The carcinisation will not stop.
All will be consumed by crab
 
8:44 AM
Oh great, being snark in our tag.
@E_net4theflagger May be the term "a specific" is not precise enough for you... — Oliv 1 min ago
 
8:56 AM
And you won't believe what happened next? :)
 
9:10 AM
@E_net4theflagger Such a click-baity-y question :)
 
@E_net4theflagger and we still don't have a way to do cargo check --doc
 
Yeah, I just run the doctests instead, but it can be a nuisance.
 
well when you can't compile the project but only check it, it's a problem
#windows
 
9:26 AM
o
 
 
2 hours later…
11:27 AM
I am reading the Tokio tutorial and don't really understand the rationale for not stack-allocating buffers, see tokio.rs/tokio/tutorial/io#allocating-a-buffer. For example, it says "This will, in turn, make Task an awkward size: $page-size + a-few-bytes". So what? Surely two allocations, one page-sized, the other a-few-bytes-sized isn't any better? Apart from that they argue the task structure would be oh so very big. Why would that be a problem? Is it compile-time related?
 
11:40 AM
Or, does it need to be movable to different memory locations? This would certainly be an argument. But when would that happen?
 
11:55 AM
@purefanatic I would disadvice 99% of time stack allocated thing
specially big buffer, anything bigger then ~32 octets
 
12:25 PM
@Stargateur Why? I never faced any problems allocating smaller buffers (few kiB) on the stack. Furthermore, as far as I understand it, Tokio tasks won't normally be allocated on the stack either way, but reside in heap memory which makes this point moot.
 
@purefanatic I believe you already decide the answer and only ask for confirm what you believe so do as you please but don't use my time for nothing
the why is already in your link
 
@Stargateur Then would you care to explain? Because I don't see how those arguments apply when tasks are heap-allocated either way. But maybe they are not, I don't know...
 
12:40 PM
cause most alocator will have a "big size" behavior and a "small size" behavior, thus asking for 2 page size cause you ask for 1 + few pages is not effective. Plus, a task is not always consumed or used fully so using a big task is not very good. Thus the conclusion, in 99% of the time use a vec, and in 1% of the rest you need to need what you are doing. And again, KISS, the stack array are faster to "allocate" but slower to use.
 
1:02 PM
@Stargateur Thanks. I see, so it's mostly the memory efficiency of the allocator that they are concerned with. That makes sense. However in this case I would argue using a plain array is the simpler solution in the sense of KISS because none of vec's additional features (such as resizing) are required to solve the problem at hand. That's part of the reason why I was wondering why one would need a more "complex" solution to be efficient.
 
1:42 PM
@purefanatic complex != complicated, sure vector have more feature but that doesn't make it hard to use on the contrary
 
2:05 PM
@Stargateur Well it's not hard to use, but neither are Arcs and I wouldn't go around recommending "just use atomic reference counting to solve all your ownership and concurrency problems". I for one think that using the least complex tool that is necessary for solving a problem in most cases leads to simpler overall solutions.
It's because simpler tools are easier to reason about: In the tutorial's example it might not make a difference, but in many hundreds lines of code I wouldn't know on first sight if the vec always had the same size, for example, and this might lead me to wrong assumptions etc. so when I see a vec, I always need to take into account the possibility of much more going on than with a plain array. Hence the solution is not KISS (in my definition of KISS) because a simpler solution exists.
 
2:46 PM
@purefanatic you could use into_boxed_slice if you wish
 
3:10 PM
@Stargateur Good point, a boxed slice or even a boxed array would have no more than I need and would still be efficient with regards to fitting the page size. But at this point I am philosophizing, sorry for the wall of text
 
3:25 PM
@E_net4theflagger @Shepmaster do you often get request to rework commit history for your pull request ? I did make some effort and the owner still have me rebase ? I mean how that very useful, can't he just squash it ? I do not think commit message are very important, (specially when we are 2 working on the thing and that the thing is not very active and finish until I work on it...)
 
3:38 PM
@Jason Congratulations! I hope you enjoy it a lot!
o/
 
Thank you @FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier! :-)
@FélixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier didn't you also do front-end or something else?
 
Yes, I did, a lot, and also now but to a lesser extent, as I've gone back into a full-stack-ish role
I hope you didn't mention it already but can you speak roughly about the tech stack? will you be using hipster JS frameworks? :)
(I like working in some of them, as you might surmise :-) )
 
@FĂ©lixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier Ah, it'll mostly be Vue, although I'm used to React
Yes, haha
Also some Three.js
 
@Jason :) I have good impression of Vue, while having really only just minimally tried it. I think it's close in spirit to Svelte?
 
@FĂ©lixAdriyelGagnon-Grenier Hum, I am not that familiar with it, but it seems Svelte has a different approach with its compilation step?
I think I would place Vue closer to React than Svelte
 
3:49 PM
oh, yes, you are right
Vue happens in the browser, I think?
 
Yeah, similar to React :-)
I haven't given Svelte a good try though, but it seems interesting.
I'd rather focus on Rust now.
 
me too. I've completely left out trying new JS frameworks and exclusively hack at rust :O
 
 
3 hours later…
6:38 PM
@Stargateur Rarely. In fact, I recently posted a comment on the subject, as I agree that save for getting rid of useless mistakes, squashing the commit history of the pull request is not very useful.
 
@E_net4theflagger so you are even more "just let it be" that what i do in my project but open source is open source but I found the onwer of github.com/duesee/abnf-core/pull/13 a little strict
 
@Stargateur Hmm, so the owner was hoping for a clearer, streamlined set of commits. I mean, it is useful when dealing with large contributions, but I don't imagine myself asking to restructure the commits and respective messages.
 
@E_net4theflagger yeah... I did some effort but I didn't make it perfect cause... we are like two for now LUL
and make a complicated git rebase just for that...
I spent already ~6 hours on this PR so I was a little sad
but I didn't contribute a lot in open source project so I ask for you advice
 
7:43 PM
Whelp, my trick is to always keep my cool, work on it as requested but always within my timeline; and know when to quietly step back. :shrug:
But then again, I was serially downvoted today, so maybe I'm oblivious of something.
 
Anyone from python?
 
8:44 PM
@Stargateur I do not often get those requests, no. I am frequently the one making the requests.
> I do not think commit message are very important,
That seems like the key issue
That being said, I tend to just {rebase, fix, reword} other peoples PRs to my projects
unless they become a longer term contributor
I also prefer to ensure that the code {builds, passes tests, passes lints} at every commit
which other people don't
 

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