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12:04 AM
> I don't see reason
Means something quite different from "I don't see the/any reason"
 
maybe he didn't understand that yank 1.0.0 would "clean" the breaking change like nothing happen
 
 
6 hours later…
6:25 AM
> error: internal compiler error: It looks like you're trying to break rust; would you like some ICE?
 
@SomeGuy I don't get it. Is this related to US politics ?
 
Haha, no an ICE is an Internal Compiler Error
 
oh... thanks
 
 
2 hours later…
8:07 AM
Rust needs ASI
 
Take a synchronous one and wrap it
 
Automatic Semicolon Insertion. I see no good reason for all those semicolons (a returned value when none is expected could just be dismissed) and they make the code painful to read, especially with "?"
 
Oh I read Asynchronous something Interface
 
8:41 AM
@DenysSéguret meh.
:)
 
@DenysSéguret Do you have an example?
 
An example of what ? Of code without semicolons to end statements ?
 
Yes. Of what could be Rust with automatic semicolon. That's quite abstract to me for now
 
8:56 AM
Maybe some things would be ambiguous.
 
@DenysSéguret I disagree, semi colon make parsing more easy and so make error message more clear.
 
if a.len() > b.len()          {a}
else if a.len() < b.len()     {b}
else                          {c}
Whelp ^
 
I think we have much bigger problems with syntax than semicolons. If anything, I would probably fix those first. ref, @, and .await to name a few..
 
@PeterVaro Now I'm used to .await. I almost never use ref and @.
 
@PeterVaro ref is not needed anymore, well, maybe but I didn't write the keyword since a lot of time
 
9:07 AM
@Stargateur I'm sure the semicolon helps the parser. But I think the cost for programmers is too high
 
It is needed from time to time
 
@DenysSéguret haha, well, I can't be neutral, I'm so used to put ;
 
@PeterVaro I agree that the whole Rust syntax could be much better. For example, the choice of < ... > for the generic is bad, IMHO.
 
@FrenchBoiethios @ could be replaced with the already used keyword in IMO. ref is needed if you want to borrow something in a deeply nested pattern
 
@PeterVaro I know, but I've ref like twice in all my projects
in is a pretty good idea
 
9:10 AM
the .await is shit, there's nothing good about this syntax, no matter how many times I read the reasoning it still fails to convince me
 
and I dislike || for the closure
 
ambiguity is bad. and using this notation is ambiguous
 
I was in favor of something like @await (or @wait lol) but they didn't want that.
 
@FrenchBoiethios actually, I don't like it either, but I would hate to use parenthesis, because those are overused in all languages (call, tuple, grouping, etc.)
@FrenchBoiethios they didn't want it, because @ was already in use
 
@PeterVaro \ like in Haskell? \(a, b) -> a + b
 
9:12 AM
but if we would use in instead of @ then we could @ for the async
@FrenchBoiethios you gotta love SO chat's broken MD
:D
 
Is that even possible to write a code block with a backslash? :P
 
@FrenchBoiethios In Haskell, Java, Javascript, arrows (fat or not) are used to indicate closures. They're neat
 
I like that. The syntax would be consistent with the function one (in Rust)
I actually like how typename works in C++. First, you declare the generic parameters, then you type your code.
We should have something like that in Rust:
generic
    T: Iterator,
    T::Item: From<i32>,
fn foobar(it: T) {
    //
}
 
that's how early <C89 worked :)
 
But what would be the syntax to make the type explicit?
 
9:20 AM
56
A: Function declaration: K&R vs ANSI

WizardK&R syntax is obsolete, you can skip it unless you have to maintain very old code. // K&R syntax int foo(a, p) int a; char *p; { return 0; } // ANSI syntax int foo(int a, char *p) { return 0; }

 
Oh, that! Yes that's old :P
 
very old... and verbose
 
you know that linux kernel still use this...
I hate linux kernel code
 
ROFL
 
9:39 AM
@Stargateur not bad actually
 
10:30 AM
posted on July 17, 2019 by Nicholas Nethercote

I have written previously about my efforts to speed up the Rust compiler in 2016 (part 1, part 2) and 2018 (part 1, part 2, NLL edition). It’s time for an update on the first half of 2019.

 
10:45 AM
Feed, you're too slow
 
Lol, that's right, I've read that like yesterday
 
 
1 hour later…
12:03 PM
We were speaking of crossbeam yesterday and the difference with mpsc. I've just used another very convenient utility: crossbeam::scope
 
12:52 PM
..although, that joke might change in the future:
- Why Python is so afraid of the water?
- ???
- Because its engine is already very rusty.
https://github.com/RustPython/RustPython
 
@PeterVaro not sure the joke is good :p
 
@Stargateur that's the best I could come up with in a couple minutes of thinking..
 
We appreciate the effort
 
@DenysSéguret LOLOLOLOLOL
 
12:56 PM
 
indeed
 
fantastic artwork, indeed!
 
 
6 hours later…
6:47 PM
This one seems to be just too broad or POB.
 
7:10 PM
cannot borrow ***x as mutable, as it is behind a & reference haha
 

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