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1:31 PM
morning cabbages, folks!
 
2 hours later…
3:46 PM
Is there a neat way to flatten an unknown number of dicts into just one dict? | only works on pairs, and the good old double-comprehension is unwieldy in my case since I have one literal k-v pair.
Well, actually flatten-by-comprehension is ugly for dict in any case since one needs so many extra names. :/
I'm pretty sure PM has a generic JSON-flattener somewhere that could help
If chat search was actually functional, I might be able to find it :/ The terms are a bit too generic right now to get a hit
It's a pointer already, perhaps I can dig it up.
For reference, this is what I have right now:
def query(self) -> dict[str, str]:
    return {self.query_id: self.expr} | reduce(
        lambda a, b: a | b, (score.query() for score in self.scores)
    )
During my search I stumbled on this:
Feb 18, 2020 at 16:00, by MisterMiyagi
Is there an efficient way to flatten several dicts into one? For set I can reduce with | but I can't think of something similar for dict.
That's one hell of a thorn in your side for all these years :P
4:02 PM
DenverMiyagi strikes again. ;_;
ChainMap it is, then.
hands roganjosh a bag of quatloos
Don't spend 'em all at once!
Oh no, I'll portion them out in future bets :) Spread-betting FTW!
I think we'll need to see if PM2Ring can dig it out, though. My trawler has come up with nothing, sorry. Tbh I'm not sure it would actually beat your current approach but IIRC it doesn't have the functional approach
> "Mapping[str, str]" is incompatible with "MutableMapping[_KT@ChainMap, _VT@ChainMap]" Pylance(reportArgumentType)
Gosh, sometimes I hate typing...
4:42 PM
Anything wrong with this?
def query(self) -> dict[str, str]:
    result = {self.query_id: self.expr}

    for score in self.scores:
        result.update(score.query())

    return result
Nothing wrong, it just seems like a lot of code for "merge these".
So I have a functio that does a lot of talking to another server. I mock those requests.
I do wonder though, should I mock the returned value as close to what a normal response is. Or should the mock be based on what data I actually "use"? IE, I know I only use the returned "id" in the json, should I then also mock the extra data that I know will be in the json?
Unless the data is truly massive, I would try and recreate it as accurately as possible.
Even with mocking, you want to test how the code behaves in the real case, not some made-up case tailored to the code.
4:58 PM
about 200 entries in the json, biggest problem is that we don't even know the meaning of most entries, as the whole thing is not (yet) documented by our partner and they just say: "just test what everything does".
I guess I should limit to the fields we formally (as per management team) understand in other parts of the code
Hm, especially if you don't know what's in there I would go with a full sample.
If you don't know what to expect, then your code won't know either. So it's probably a good idea that it can handle the unexpected items.
That's true, I'm just afraid it will so easily get outdated, as I know our partner is also actively developing, and working with multiple others (the others have probably all argued for some fields to be available)
 
2 hours later…
6:43 PM
is it bad when I feel like punching my colleagues? :P
layers upon layers of indirection for really little use
 
2 hours later…
8:52 PM
@paul23 of course it's bad

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