« first day (4993 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) » 

12:01 AM
So the XML download should escape/urlencode it. but seems you have to use curl --data-urlencode {data} {url}, but that's not a one-liner. See cURL escape & in data
12:13 AM
NumPy 2.0 Release Notes and discussion on HN. Tons of deprecations and changes. Anyone see a good writeup on the most important changes? Or how to migrate 1.x -> 2.x code?
...anything better than NumPy 2.0 migration guide?
NumPy 2.0: Highlights seems best: "... new variable-length string dtype, StringDType and a new numpy.strings namespace with performant ufuncs for string operations"
 
7 hours later…
7:31 AM
@smci it's just curious to me that so much bad encoding exists out there. My problems with JSON in pandas was only around nesting depth where I find it totally unintuitive. Not bad encoding.
I've only ever known XML from config files anyway so it's interesting to see this be a common pain in some kind of reference data (something you'd want to process in pandas) with & busting the parser in an obscure way
I've seen XML a lot for structured/schema'd data, and also in anything close to the Java world.
Yeah, I know it mainly from the pom files in Java land
For some reason, our ultra high performance storage middleware offers monitoring data in either an ultra packed layered binary format... and XML.
I blame historical reasons for that. And AI.
Wow. I did not expect that! I would have thought compression would have been paramount from the very start
I'm assuming that "ultra high performance" is a semi-official categorisation? In which case, is it just in retrieving monitoring data that XML comes into play? Presumably the middleware is trying to make it user-friendly but doesn't reflect the way data is created and stored
8:00 AM
@aeiou depends on the date in there. if it represents something that has an inherent hierarchical structure, then nesting will make lookups better. if it's just a collection of data points where you don't do lookups and just dump the whole thing, then flat will make that easier
at our org, we store data that represents a multi-dimensional grid in a flat format, and it's a pain for lookups. whenever I interact with it, I nest it first so that
for row in data:
  if row["col_a"] == "a" and row["col_b"] == "b" and row["col_c"] == "c":
    return row["result"]
else:
  raise LookupError
turns into
return data["a"]["b"]["c"]
That looks ripe for polars?
this code is run in an environment which doesn't come with the numpy-and-friends stack, and I jump through a moderate amount of hoops to keep pandas/polars out specifically
I got burned by panda's "figure the types out by looking at the data" a few times too much. it's a good tool, but not geared for settings where a human isn't part of the loop.
Can be both a blessing and a curse :) I got 2 orders of magnitude speed up switching pandas out for heavily-nested dicts in one of my "digital twin" (I'm probably overstating it here) simulators but it became almost arcane to know which level of nesting you needed to access. Still, it needed numpy as a base, though
@Arne I don't think it even goes that far to figure the types out, and it will definitely allow implicit type conversions when it gives up. polars has a lot more control over that - you can specify exactly how many rows to use for inference and Rust will have absolutely none of your nonsense if types don't match up
infer_datetimes (at least used to) swap between UK/US date formats within the same column in pandas as soon as it found something invalid. That was a hot mess.
8:19 AM
does polars have the option to accept type-mappings for read_*-like operations which will be enforced?
because that's my biggest gripe with pandas, if I read data I don't have the option to tell it the types before it does its guessing, which makes error handling a pain
Just got a quick meeting now but been looking into this. Are you talking about something like CSV or something like parquet which stores types in metadata?
8:46 AM
@roganjosh The data served is regular, the monitoring is extra on what the middleware actually does. So you've got "if you turn on this monitoring detail, data performance degrades 4%" etc. And for some inexplicable reason, you've got a separate XML monitoring stream with no comment whatsoever.
 
2 hours later…
10:38 AM
@roganjosh M/D/Y and D/M/Y formats. There are other countries than those two, y'know.
@Arne Yes you do, pd.read_... commands accept dtype arguments. Best approach is to read in say nrows=1000 lines, infer the dtypes, date format etc., see if it hiccups, then reread the whole file with those settings.
@smci sure. It was just the easiest illustration for when it goes horribly wrong
 
1 hour later…
11:58 AM
@smci huh
I wonder why I never found that
Hmm, FedEx just delivered my package, half an hour late outside of a 3 hour time slot and called me Joseph on delivery. If literally any of those things happened when I was doing routing I would have been dragged over hot coals :/ I wonder how important 1 hour slots really are
Around here they just discretely shift their delivery slots ever so over the day slightly until they fit reality.
Package delivery is some serious 1984'ing. "We were always going to deliver the package at 13:37." fiddles with gas lights
The contracted work I did, we had to have 1 hour slots and I wasn't even allowed to use minute-precision (e.g. between 8:12 and 9:12) but only hour-level-precision. It was a nightmare
@MisterMiyagi it's probably even worse than you imagine. Their pay is based on the real-road algorithm so it ignores a lot of detours the drivers actually have to do.
It was a very strange position to be in because the system we were building could not be binding for the driver, since that would be a direct instruction and then the drivers would be classed as employees. That would have cost our client millions of quid a year. At the same time, drivers would be paid on the basis of my routes, regardless of whether they actually took that route. Gig work is... interesting
12:27 PM
morning cabbages, folks!
 
1 hour later…
1:36 PM
I'm currently refactoring a piece of code that has side effects (console output/input) instead of throwing exceptions. It feels very 2015
I was today years old when I learned about: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessel%27s_correction
 
1 hour later…
2:41 PM
I've heard of that but I forgot "whose" it was
 
1 hour later…
3:46 PM
Woah, I opened a can of worms: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unbiased_estimation_of_standard_deviation I mean it helped me, I think I got a better estimator now than I had before for my problem, but woah...
 
1 hour later…
4:54 PM
kinda extreme to say on the channel about it, but I believe the python filter function is not intuitive as like in TS/JS or maybe they are a different thing alltogether? but anyways, with non existent docs on the function that only explain what filter does without example and the overall syntax doesnt seem friendly to me. Anyone else in the same boat?
5:10 PM
are you running into a specific issue?
What did you try doing in TS/JS, and what problem have you encountered with trying to do the same thing in Python?
@Arne Ok, I will trust there are hierarchies in nature and representing data in such a manner is therefore natural
map and filter have effectively been superseded by list comprehensions
i wonder if uniqueness of quarks imply non-hierarchical nature of reality
I am not running into a specific issue but I decided why not and thought of using it over list comprehensions, but it wasn't that intuitive for me to use it
like for example:


numbers = [1, 3, 7, 2, 9, 4]

def is_greater_than_5(num):
return num > 5
```
filtered_numbers = list(filter(is_greater_than_5, numbers))
print(filtered_numbers) # Output: [7, 9]
```

vs


```
filtered_numbers = [num for num in numbers if num > 5]
print(filtered_numbers)
```

vs

```
const numbers = [1, 3, 7, 2, 9, 4];

const filtered_numbers = numbers.filter(num => num > 5);
console.log(filtered_numbers);
```


i would prefer 2 or 3 over 1, also there's this lambda keyword involved
@Aran-Fey Yes, truly, it's also more readable I would say
5:32 PM
When pyright complains that a variable is potentially unbound, is there a nicer way to shut it up than assert my_variable # type: ignore?
Hmm. Now that I think about it, fixing my code would probably be a nicer way to do that
Is assert really necessary? I stay away from it, and rather prefer initialization at declaration directly, so there's one place i need to look at if it starts yelling
5:50 PM
Can you always rewrite the code so that the variable is immediately initialized? I think there are situations where that won't work or will lead to uglier code
6:13 PM
@AshwinPhadke please see our formatting guide for chat. You cannot mix plaintext and code in a single message so it ends up being a mess. You also can't use shift to increase the line count of individual messages without borking the formatting
Separately I think you and Aran are talking about different things now, and I don't really understand your question anyway. filter is not in popular use and I'm not sure what an appropriate response would be to your comment other than "ok, yeah, it doesn't work like JS"
@roganjosh yes thank you.
@roganjosh yeah it was more of an opinion and seeing if someone found a way around it or learned to use it in a way easier to understand rather than ask for help
It's exactly as you used it. It takes a callable, be it a lambda or a proper function
6:30 PM
@AshwinPhadke Can you perhaps say what you are missing for filter? There isn’t any special syntax to it and the language reference is generally light on examples.
@Aran-Fey I generally try to be about 20% less cleverer in such cases. Usually that works.
On an unrelated note, SO chat on mobile is savage. Oh my…
Drink some decleverisation juice and it kinda works in a pub corner. It's been my MO for a long time now
You can actually get the normal web view on mobile which I think I still have, but it's a PITA to figure it out. You will have seen myself and Andras discuss RO actions in this room (like moving messages etc.) because trying to do anything like that on a mobile would be catastrophic. I'd probably end up booting you all and freezing the room
@MisterMiyagi What I am missing is a intuitive way to understand it like in the first example it just throws me off, where if you used maybe lambda in this case it would be more intuitive, like
lambda: num: num >5
@roganjosh To get the desktop view you; load the page, press the burger/kebab and select Desktop site. (possibly another step for some non-FF browsers) However both views suck on mobile.
when I last mentioned this to someone we came to a conclusion that this is what should be called "vibes based programming" just because vibes lol
@AshwinPhadke a list comprehension is probably faster anyway. Guido wanted to remove filter many, many years ago. It's functional-style programming and it was just kept around
@Peilonrayz I used the developer survey freetext to moan again about chat. I know they don't care but there's still some catharsis in it
6:46 PM
@AshwinPhadke Using a lambda in filter is a waste - either you already have a function, then filter is fine, or you don’t, then a comprehension wins in just about every regard.
@roganjosh Yup, chat's been FUBAR for years. But other tasks are 'more important' like: AI; starting, shutting down and restarting Jobs; deleting half the user base. To name a couple.
that's a really good point - anything lambda expressible is listcomp expressible. So lambda-filter is a very redundant construct. non-lambda-function-filter works because you have complex logic captured in a function
@Peilonrayz it's a real shame because I like to think that this format works way better than the main site and it can be managed (if we had a massive influx of the likes from the main site then I might have a nervous breakdown) but quality is generally pretty high in the discussions or they just get cut off
7:10 PM
got it @rogan and @MisterMiyagi , didn't knew it was a temporary thing
It's not a temporary thing? It's carried over from python 2
Guido talked about removing filter many years ago
 
3 hours later…
10:08 PM
@roganjosh What did you say? What should SO be doing about chat? Or just that it's the only remaining thing that has value for many of us, as the edifice collapses?

« first day (4993 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) »