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3:17 AM
@roganjosh Perhaps DS libraries aren't typically backward compatible and 'randomly' break. So random breakage = libraries fubaring again.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:34 AM
I've figured it out now and it's pretty logical albeit frustrating. It's because everything is notebook-based and the only way to have more than one "module" is to use a magic command to run a notebook within a notebook, and inject its namespace into the current notebook. This method is rife with name conflicts as you never know where globals have come from and it's super-easy to trample names in the current notebook. So, unexpected error -> "I've trampled the name somewhere".
The only thing wrong with their statement here is "import conflict" which is not what they meant (I'd been thinking of it as "oh, numpy must clash with pandas versions" or something similar). They're not imports at all, they're hacked dumping of namespaces into the current one
 
 
5 hours later…
10:05 AM
@discoMonkey It's perfectly fine to let a function/method just end if it's purpose is to have a side-effect. If the purpose is to provide a value (even if it could be None), the function should always return on every path. PEP-8 says so as well:
> Be consistent in return statements. Either all return statements in a function should return an expression, or none of them should. If any return statement returns an expression, any return statements where no value is returned should explicitly state this as return None, and an explicit return statement should be present at the end of the function
 
Huh, I don't think I've obeyed that or that it was even in my mind
 
@roganjosh I've found such a mindset to be very prevalent for people that "are an X, not a programmer". Sometimes you can get them by making them consider the X-purpose in the code ("what's your goal here of putting a float into a list?"). Sometimes, they even learn to do that themselves after a while...
@roganjosh Well, now you know. Obey!
 
Yes sir!
 
Welcome to the Church of PEP-8! Rejoice!
 
I wonder what the thought process is behind that. I don't use mypy but I assume it doesn't complain if you annotate with -> None and omit the return None (or maybe it does...)? The only time I've seen something similar is specifications for system-critical code where every if must be accompanied with an else even if it's a no-op just to show it was at least considered
In reality, it's basically impossible to not have return None mandated in every program that, like, does something
 
10:20 AM
I don't think MyPy or PyLance enforce that. The PEP-8 advice has been around for quite a while already, too.
Personally, I prefer the explicit return to make it clear you actually intended to return None and didn't just accidentally fall of the edge of the earth function.
 
Yeah, tbh I probably actually do that naturally anyway. I thought maybe I could dig out an example from an SQL function that does a simple insert but all of mine end up feeding back into the frontend anyway, so they all have to return something even if I technically could just rely on a try/except to know if it failed
 
 
9 hours later…
7:40 PM
Am I reading this right for postgres? This terribly brief answer appears to suggest that an index for a full value is also useful for a substring, as long as I don't have a wildcard at the start of the match? In the past I've seen a few systems where a product code might be 12345, which I will store as a string, but actually the 5 is a checksum so I'd also want to index 1234
BUT that would be on a per-user basis, so I can't make any assumption that such a search would be possible. It'd be mighty useful, though, if it's a general property of indexes on strings if someone searching for 1234 got the efficiency of an indexed lookup simply by default and I don't have to do anything for it
And if that is true, I have absolutely no idea how it works other than some divine intervention since surely it would rely on hashes and some_hash_fnc('1234') and some_hash_fnc('12345') would be unrelated. I don't see how it's not a generic, slow, substring search. Is it a property of BTrees?
 
probably suffix trees. if you have enough time and space, you can build crazy fast (sub)string search in a document
(a table is a kind of document)
 
7:57 PM
The thing is, I don't want to target this as an optimisation, I was curious whether I got it for free. If someone is searching for "white elephant" and they just type "elephant" in the dropdown, I'm happy for it to be a slow search to pull any matches it finds. But if they type 7029 (an actual product code) which, with the checksum in some systems is 70294 I'm curious whether the index on 70294 helps with 7029
I think the pg_trgm suggestion in the comment is a lost cause in this case, since a lot of product numbers at other companies are like PC0000001, PC0000002 and so on. I guess I'll have to test this one out
 
i mean, I can't help with domain problems. if it doesn't help getting only some entries then it's not good. I can only say that substring search with an index, if implemented properly, is really really fast
 
I'm definitely going to look into it, thanks for the suggestion! I'm also being wooly because I'm speculating on non-existent customers while setting this up, which doesn't help sorry
 
8:24 PM
Ok, it seems I'd completely misunderstood both that post and your follow-up and uncovered something I was totally oblivious to in postgres re: string indexes. 🎵 A whole new worrrrrld 🎵. Thanks!
 

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