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2:00 AM
is there some sort of approach to software programming where software is programmed modularly, so that different parts of the code can be ran individually without needing to run the entire program? is this possible in python?
 
2:26 AM
this seems to be the idea behind test-driven design. how modular can we get? I wish I could save the state of execution of my program at a certain point, then test out different "completion paths" to obtain my desired result
 
2:51 AM
hm, some people really insist on static typing for increased modularity
 
 
4 hours later…
6:26 AM
@shintuku Yes; this is basically what programming is, and it's possible in every language worth mentioning.
saving execution state is probably not really what you want, as compelling as it might seem. What you want is to have a well defined interface for the start of the "completion path" - for example, the parameters of a function - and save the input to that - for example, values that you will use for arguments to call the function.
People have many reasons they like static typing, but it has basically nothing to do with modularity.
LISP's design offers the ultimate in modularity: the syntax is perfectly regular, since you basically write out the AST directly, and thus basically any part of the program is severable and separately usable (whether the result is meaningful is another question). And it's dynamically typed.
 
6:46 AM
@shintuku it's not that you need static typing for modularity, but the two share some features that make them strongly related in practice. Types encode how things look to the outside (i.e. how they can be used as "modules" inside other code) and staticness can only encode explicit actions without hidden interactions (i.e. actually being self-contained "modules").
 
 
2 hours later…
8:16 AM
@shintuku I think the idea closest to what you are describing is microservices. It mostly concerns architecture of your applications and, as oppossed to monoliths, splits the software into smaller, separate funcionalities that are separate but interact with each other.
 
8:55 AM
 
 
4 hours later…
1:00 PM
What's up with the spam of horribly low quality questions at this time?
 
1:22 PM
Also, is there any active chat for webdev related stuff?
 
The javascript room?
They cover most of the frontend tech and then anything backend might belong here or in the repective backend language room. We have quite a lot of people doing full stack in here, for example, so it wouldn't be out of place if you're using a python framework but want to hook it up to the front end
 
 
2 hours later…
3:16 PM
@matszwecja There's apparently some pretty horrible fallout of students being tasked to "contribute" to SO. See recent meta questions.
 
I'm finding it increasingly hard to buy that excuse. It looks more like using GPT to evade charcoal or something. For what purpose, I don't know. But still they come.
 
Well, I'm not saying they don't also use ChatGPT.
 
I think I finally managed to find a way to replicate youtube.com/watch?v=CgW0HPHqFE8. Took me a while since I had problems with osmnx and memory usage
 
True, I just mean that a typical spammer might have a new tool in their arsenal to make something convincing enough to evade our existing tools in an automated way, so now they get more through
@NordineLotfi is it a "pure" implementation shown in that video? I remember seeing it before and it still looks more active than I would expect in the wrong direction once it really gets going, but I've never actually seen it visualised
 
3:33 PM
they never published any code, so I had to work with just the video and try and match what they were doing. Mine will look less fancy since they used blender for the final visualization step but it will be very close
 
@roganjosh Indeed. It probably just hits closer to home for me to see such stuff coming from (university) students.
 
That seems fair, but it's the assumption that they're university students that I'm questioning. On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog etc. etc. I can't see how such an assignment would be set in the first place, or that it could still be running at the rate it is. The curmudgeon in me suspects something more at work in testing spam evasion, and it's a convenient excuse for innocence to be a "student" if they get pulled in some way for it
@NordineLotfi are you using files from geofabrik? If so, what's the region size you're using?
 
@roganjosh did not try geofabrik yet. I'm pulling the data using this: gist.github.com/secemp9/f94cfc1ea682bb3891c59b6b0c921cb6
since the video description mention using edges and nodes, and by looking at the video and the result in matplotlib, it seems pretty much 1:1 minus the fanciness
I got stuck on this for more than a month now. It also use less memory than my previous attempts (but then again I did not yet try on larger region)
 
3:50 PM
Yeah, I can well imagine the memory problem. OSRM et al. use contraction hierarchies and it's still a monster to hold decent map sizes even after that pruning
 
that does explain the memory problem I had :o I never thought of pruning yet so this might help down the line for larger map sizes
right now I'm happy I finally got the base for this down. Now just need to finish the pygame code for it and add support for A star
 
CH is an offline pre-processing step so I'm not sure osmnx will let you do anything like that, you'd possibly need to build your own parser over the .pbf files. That's certainly quite a bit of work :P I look forward to seeing your outputs
 
Thanks :) will post it here once it's finished
 
4:10 PM
@roganjosh That's a good point, thanks for making it. This actually lightens my mood a bit.
 
thanks for your comments!
am currently delving deeper into the subject. does anyone have reading recommendations for software design in Python if I want to increase the refactorability of my code, and ease of maintenance over several months?
 
I think you would probably be better looking at established libraries that you use frequently and have an intuitive feel for how they work for you as a user
Almost all library source code can be found by googling "<library name> github". Then you can look at how they implemented the features. Most mainstream libraries are actually pretty good, just don't go looking into things like pandas which (with no real criticism to them; it's circumstantial) has just ballooned into some weird hydra
 
 
3 hours later…
7:07 PM
@roganjosh this makes sense, thanks for the comments!
 
7:37 PM
does anyone have strong opinions against test-driven development?
 
While it's not exactly the same thing as test-driven development, I recently realized I should do more usage-driven development. Spent a whole day designing a module, and when I used it for the first time I realized it was terrible. So yeah, sometimes you should definitely start by pretending that your code already exists
 
7:55 PM
I think it's fine, but it can slow you down considerably when you're starting from scratch. at least the way I come up with the first batch of code that Actually Does Something, things change so quickly that fixing the test suite each time would just annoy me, or even worse, make me not bother to improve things because it'd be tedious. if you have a codebase already is where TDD feels like a useful pattern to me.
 
8:17 PM
@user16217248 why does that need deleting?
 
@Aran-Fey @Arne interesting and useful commentary, thanks!
 
@roganjosh It's way to broad and opinion-based and unclear.
 
All of which are close vote reasons
Closed questions get "roomba'd" and will disappear. Please don't call for deletion on this kind of thing unless there's a strong reason for it
 
8:36 PM
hi. im just learning python
im using python in blender
 
in a certain sense, TDD can conflict with architectural, UML-style planning of your software, no?
 

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