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12:02 AM
To me it also seems as gray area between SO and Code Review
 
12:15 AM
And..... it's closed 😅
reopened 😀
 
12:29 AM
@alkasm OK. Your assumption is correct as well. :-)
 
 
8 hours later…
8:24 AM
NB "positive" and "negative" doesn't mean "particle" and "anti-particle" - woah more lies for children. Thanks for that article, this gives a further pointer to read on when I'm bored with work @AndrasDeak
 
 
1 hour later…
9:37 AM
@Aran-Fey I was looking at messages from other rooms in the sidebar, and ended up finding dpaste.com/DCJLEDGWA#line-557. Will it Just Work if I uncomment this block?
interpolating old and new message colours would work for me, assuming that's what this would do
 
Yeah, that's what it does. Looks pretty ugly though, that's why I removed it
 
Back in it goes then :D Thanks.
current state looks terrible too
Yeah, it looks absolutely better this way.
 
10:09 AM
cbg
I released the app finally, still on beta, would appreciate if you could install and give some feedback :) github.com/nihaalnz/PassLost
 
10:51 AM
@CoolCloud How will users use it?
Install it, run it?
And you shouldn't have __pycache__ in your repo. Make sure you didn't add other kinds of fluff there by accident. Like access tokens and stuff.
The thing about git add . is that you should usually never do it
 
11:20 AM
Ah well I used the Github desktop app, ill remove the pycache, what is it though
@AndrasDeak Yea install and run, like a desktop application
 
Wow, you implemented a splash screen just for the sake of having a splash screen. 3.5 seconds of waiting for the program to start for nothing
 
@CoolCloud it's the python bytecode for modules, there for quicker execution on subsequent runs. stackoverflow.com/questions/16869024/what-is-pycache worth noting that it should be in your gitignore if you're using git
 
This GUI is more like my practice for PyQt, so I implemented a splash screen for the sake of practicing, sooner, Ill have it work with actual loading, but this app requires not more than 1 or 2 seconds to load up I guess.
@ParitoshSingh Oh, I see, I've taken it down, thanks for the info
 
@AndrasDeak now hol' up a minute, git add . is awesome. that and git add . -u have covered probably 99% of all git add* commands i've used in my life so far (though admittedly, i got into git very recently. heck, you may remember sharing an interactive tutorial for it a while back. thanks btw!) edit- sry double ping
 
11:36 AM
I had used git from CLI initially but then once I discovered Github Desktop, I changed to that
 
my story is the opposite. some places simply don't give you the luxury of installing what you want :/ but i think moving to the cli was a great call in the long run
 
So basically __pycache__ is only created once you import some modules, else it wouldnt?
 
great for when you don't have the luxury of an GUI, say when working with remote servers.
 
@ParitoshSingh Ah yea, I should practice the CLI version
 
@CoolCloud install how?
@ParitoshSingh git add . is great if your .gitignore is perfect. Which one day it won't be.
 
11:43 AM
 
Alternatively, git add . is great if you check what you've added before you commit. Which one day you won't.
@CoolCloud I see some dot ee eks ee file. What do I do with that?
 
I avoid using git from the command line and I still somehow managed to commit my .vscode directory :|
 
Well usually people would cleck on that 'dot ee eks ee file' and download it and then install it
 
@Aran-Fey Not sure about the causal relationship there. I'd say using git from the command line makes it a lot easier not to commit by mistake. If you avoid git add . that i.
 
11:45 AM
I use it from pycharm and cli, pycharm has a really nice ui for git stuff
 
@CoolCloud i think you missed the point, AD doesn't have windows.
 
Well that was one of my guess, TBH, but I left it behind. Guess I should add it back :P
 
exes are just about as useful to linux users as .. uh... <insert some really witty analogy here>
 
the "minimize window" button
 
Though I would like to see how this file source code would run in a macOS, my cousin has a mac, guess I'll ask him to run it and maybe compile it too
 
11:49 AM
"this file"? The exe?
 
Nono the source code
 
I also looked at the zip/tgz in your releases, and it seemed to me the contents don't match your repo.
So what is the point of the repo exactly?
 
Hmmmm I did make few changes after releasing it, have to fix it
 
I'm talking about stuff like hash.py and make.py, with no explanation on how to use them
 
Yea no documentation as of now, will be implementing it soon
 
12:02 PM
I mean, you're not supposed to use them. You're supposed to use the installer
 
@Aran-Fey what is "the installer"?
Or is this windows-only? In that case it's all fine as is :P
 
The exe file, yeah
 
Also, you can react to releases? Ugh.
 
What is wrong in that
 
12:19 PM
I'm not sure that "hash" is the right term for what this module does. Aren't hashes usually one-way? github.com/nihaalnz/PassLost/blob/main/main/hash.py
 
you're right, they are.
 
Perhaps "enc" or "encrypt" something?
 
encryption/decryption, though enc sounds like just an annoying abbreviation to me
 
"encrypt" is short enough that I think you can justify spelling it out in its entirety
Possible danger: mixing sql and str.format github.com/nihaalnz/PassLost/blob/main/main/main.py#L137
 
Oh wait, they can name their file something sus, and get away with SQL injection right! Ugh never thought of it
 
12:31 PM
Why does the name of the table depend on the file name anyway?
 
Wouldn't the be injecting code on their own systems?
Do you have a server that does any work?
Which is not a reason to ignore best practices, but still
 
I'm guessing that bad guys don't have full control over that string, because it needs to be a valid filename. Right? So for example it couldn't contain slashes.
Or is that a windows only thing
 
the whole app seems to be a windows only thing
 
Phew
But yeah, defense against sql injection is not a super high priority for fully local dbs
 
@Aran-Fey Well yea, I could give it a name myself. I don't exactly remember why I did this
@Kevin Yea with that in mind, they could query the entire database, to get the encrypted code, but it wont do them much good unless they have the key to decrypt, if they do, then BOOM
 
12:36 PM
@CoolCloud this the answer you get when asking any dev why they did something stupid :P
 
Giving your tables a name yourself seems like a worthwhile improvement, I approve
 
I hate the stage of a project where you know exactly how things work and how to do them, but it still takes hours to do the work. I think the most between I know how it works and the pc knows how it works, which I can handle is 15-30min
Also doing stuff in C++ it is NEVER 15-30min, more like 3-4h
 
fortunately we have to concern ourselves with python
 
how I miss candyland :)
 
I am surprised I could not find any video on how to compile PyQt for macOS
 
12:40 PM
Relatable, I adopted Python in the first place because it had a much smaller idea-to-execution elapsed time
Compared to... Pretty much any other language I tried
You can shrink that time yourself by being Terribly Clever, but in my experience the language always applies a constant multiple to that
 
@Kevin and create a maintenance nightmare in the process, but yeah I'm going some middle route. But the program aint pretty
 
@Kevin Any name suggestions for the other file? make.py?
 
My first instinct is the to-the-point name encryption.py, unless that causes an awkward name collision anywhere
 
The annoying part of C++ is that it takes so much effort to move code around, you can't just move one section to another and expect it to work. That is a no brainer in python, which in turn makes me code veeeery large files, approaching 1000 lines. Which makes compilation so slow and also requires a lot of scrolling, but I'd rather wait for the pc than type a lot :P
 
@Kevin What I meant was, there is another file called make.py ~ github.com/nihaalnz/PassLost/blob/main/main/make.py any other name suggestions for it, and yea the other one will be changed to encryption.py
 
12:45 PM
If you're Terribly Terribly Clever, you can write Terribly Clever code that is still maintainable and readable. In theory. I've never attained this state myself.
@CoolCloud Oh, sorry, I misunderstood the question. I'm thinking something with 'database" or "db" in it, because at first I thought the file had something to do with the build automation tool Make.
 
@Kevin Perhaps you have achieved being so clever that clever code looks not clever.
 
Ah, perhaps dbs.py or something
 
Perhaps. When a project has only four py files, you can get away with a three letter acronym or two without overloading the reader's brain
 
:P Ah I see
 
I often think about the cognitive overhead required to understand a program in its entirety... Probably because I personally find it easier to solve a problem if I can visualize the entire thing at once
Hmm, it sounds like a truism when I put it like that. But there's this, subjective quality of problems and solutions, that is related to complexity but not perfectly correlated with it.
Sometimes I look at a complex problem and think, literally, "yeah I bet I could unhinge my jaw and swallow this problem whole"
 
1:03 PM
Well I have not got to that part yet :P
 
This may be a qualia that is unique to my particular inner world
 
@Arne Cheers :)
 
morning cabbages, folks
 
@Kevin you said the magic word and lost me (:
 
In other words, my attempts to describe my inner experience might be about as useful as two people trying to figure out if they perceive the color red the same way.
 
1:17 PM
'but what if my read is not the same as your read' (: Btw from AI to zombies is kinda entertaining, but also quite redundant and US centric. I wish there were a EU version
 
zombies probably refers to philosophical zombies, and not the horror-story ones, right?
 
I guess, didn't make it this far :D
I'm kinda hoping the book is gonna pick up midway
Also how common are creationists? The book makes it sound like it's 50/50, I would assume they are around a few %
Hmmm, the first few google hits point to around 40%. But hard to tell if that is a made up stat or not
 
1:32 PM
The well-respected Gallup poll says, around 40%
I assume that includes the entire spectrum from "hasn't thought about it since sunday school 20 years ago, but checks 'creationist' on polls" to "ordinary person, goes to church once a week, fills out polls as if their priest was watching" to "stands on street corners and yells at people about fake dinosaur fossils"
 
Now I want to know the distribution of those 40% between the 3 groups :D
 
@Kevin among the general population? No way.
 
In America? I think there are quite a lot of groups 1 and 2. It's just not obvious unless they have a jesus fish on their car.
 
Ugh
No wonder the world is ending, then.
 
1:48 PM
I have complicated feelings on the matter, which roughly boil down to "most people are basically good, and capable of critical thinking in important situations, and this is largely uncorrelated with any demographic"
 
@Kevin so can you also generally choose in school between science and creationism? I thought that was a special case, limited only to a few backward states.
 
Woah, getting Eigen syntax right on the first try by reading the docs, today is a good day :)
 
If it's indeed a special case then this is even more alarming. This means half the population has no issue ignoring the most fundamental results of science when authorities tell them to. This could explain a lot of pseudo-science/antivax. How are people supposed to know what is the good science to believe?
 
In my school, science was a required course and there wasn't any formal opt-out system for religious grounds. I think one or two of my teachers may have given a speech along the lines of "here's the scientific consensus, if you have faith that it is wrong, then you are welcome to continue thinking that" before going into a topic like the history of the universe or dinosaurs or suchlike
 
On the vaccine, man it was amazing. I did the first one yesterday, I could park right in front of the entrance, showed my qr code, a few question, vaccine, zack I'm out in less than 15min. It was lovely how efficient it was
 
2:03 PM
Let's just say my feelings are very simple about this newly acquired information
But no point in being stuck on it
@Kevin did you make any progress with the maybe-hash file format?
 
In my mental model of the 40%, the vast majority of groups 1 and 2 would get to the lesson on dinosaurs and think "this is dubious, but I'll memorize and recite whatever sequence of words will get me a passing grade."
A phrase which I thought to myself about one million times over the course of my education
@AndrasDeak mixed success. I set aside the table of maybe-hashes, because I don't think I have enough data to draw any good conclusions. The table after that, however, has been quite fruitful. It contains about 20% of the data that I'm actually trying to extract.
 
Nice
 
My current frustration is that the table begins with the usual header data, and then there are N bytes of apparent nonsense, and then there are the contents of the data in a sensible form. It's easy enough for me to poke around in a hex editor and figure out the size of the nonsense. but N varies from table to table, so I don't know how I would skip over it algorithmically.
 
I've been wondering about the number of the shorter header maybe-hashes (10). Whether it's related to the number of subsequent lines.
@Kevin I presume you've checked already if N is encoded nearby
 
Yes, and there aren't any bytes that are exactly equal to N. There are a couple that are in the ballpark, so maybe they describe the size of the junk field plus some constant value that only makes sense if you know the file format inside out.
 
2:13 PM
Yeah
Or if there are only a handful of distinct Ns they could be encoded with a category
 
My next step is to compare some tables side-by-side and see if these ballpark fields are consistently ballparky in all of them
My worry is that N is encoded with a category, and that data is stored within the maybe-hash table
 
That would be suboptimal...
 
where is this mysterious data coming from?
 
The Unity game engine.
 
It popped into existence in Kevin's pantry between the jams and the cling film
 
2:19 PM
The quite-nearly-complete UnityPack project parses the table like so. It examines the "class id" to determine how big the rest of the row is, and then reads it into a self.hashes dict without trying to decipher its contents. As far as I know, that dict is not used anywhere else.
This at least is encouraging, since it implies that I too can write a quite nearly complete parser without breaking this table open.
 
a parser of what?
 
Asset files. Essentially zip archives of images and text files and such
 
from asset to a zip of images and text?
 
If they really are hashes then there's nothing to crack there
 
I would like to note that I am not sticking my nose in obfuscated data for evil purposes. The developer of the project that produced my sample input has given a green light to anybody to experiment as long as they're "not a dick about it"
 
2:25 PM
My estimate of your evilness before this comment was around 50%, now it's around 45% :)
 
@Hakaishin If I could turn the asset file into an actual zip directory of actual images and text files, I would be quite happy. My most fundamental goal is less ambitious. There are about five specific tables that I want to extract, and they all contain only numbers and strings. So if it turns out I can't figure out how to extract jpg files or whatever, that's not a big deal.
This also means that if push comes to shove I can just poke around in the hex editor five times to determine the N values for the specific tables that interest me, and skip the ten thousand ones I don't care about
 
2:45 PM
Can anyone think of a generator-coroutine in the standard library?
 
The closest thing I can find is asyncio.as_completed, which is documented to return an iterator, but might actually be a generator under the hood
Oh wait, that's a normal iterator, not an async one
 
3:03 PM
it looks like even the glossary keeps generator-coroutines a secret.
 
dirty little secret, to be specific
 
docs.python.org/3/library/… contains both the words "generator" and "coroutine" but I don't know if it helps you
Perhaps you could argue that the implementation of the @coroutine generator, is itself a generator-coroutine
Also, perhaps I am barely aware of what I'm talking about, so feel free to ignore me
 
3:21 PM
I was hoping for something that isn't gobbled up by a framework. Anything that The User is supposed to send to.
 
Ok, makes sense. No, I'm not aware of something like that in the standard libs.
 
3:38 PM
Whenever I use .send() in my own code, I come down with a case of "can't plug in the USB the first 2 times"-itis. Whichever yield statement I think the generator is currently paused on, I'm wrong.
It's easy enough to correct with a couple attempts and maybe some diagnostic printing, but it's a song and dance I grow tired of
 
I just implement a class with a similar functionality instead of using generators
 
For example, just now I tried writing a generator that yields the sum of all arguments you send it. Let's see how I did.
def adder():
    total = 0
    while True:
        total += yield total
g = adder()
print(g.send(1))
print(g.send(2))
print(g.send(4))
#expected output: 1, 3, 7
#actual output: TypeError: can't send non-None value to a just-started generator
With the benefit of hindsight, I think I understand why this design wouldn't produce the output I expect. But the trouble with hindsight is, I don't have it when I'm looking at an empty notepad++ tab
 
That just needs an initial next(g), right?
 
Yeah. But even with a simple change like that, I feel the fog of confusion forming around my ankles
The underlying problem is that my mental model is the wrong shape. The solution is to wield my biggest spikiest ClueBat and correct the shape with extreme prejudice
(disclaimer: I do not endorse prejudice or violence against human models, or any other kind of human)
 
3:55 PM
to be fair generator coroutines always seemed like objects that are only useful in very specific, limited situations
 
never used them. They seem really nice for this one problem, but well I never had that problem
 
perhaps in said valid use cases their use would be evident
 
I consider them very powerful, from an academic standpoint. From a practical standpoint, I find I don't need them much, and they're not quite as polished as the rest of the language in terms of hiding implementation details from you.
IIRC the last time I used them was when I wrote a recursive function that needed to recurse arbitrarily deeply, and I couldn't figure out how to write an iterative version, and I didn't want to manually set the maximum recursion depth.
My reluctance was probably 20% "I'm afraid that I'll choose a maximum that's too small" and 30% "ugh, I could pick an astronomically huge value, but that's inelegant though :-/" and 50% "hey wouldn't it be cool to reinvent the call stack?"
Spoilers: it was cool.
 
I thought reinventing the call stack is the iterative version
 
That, too, is cool. But this is to go even cooler beyond.
I'm a bit fuzzy about how exactly yield-and-send were instrumental in my overly complicated call stack, but it was assuredly rad
This might be an underspecified question, but, do async functions have a maximum recursion depth?
Tentative answer: yep
import asyncio
async def add(a,b):
    if a == 0: return b
    else: return await add(a-1, b+1)
print(asyncio.run(add(1000, 0)))
#RecursionError: maximum recursion depth exceeded in comparison
 
4:13 PM
await is basically just a fancy loop.
It calls a special method just like for does.
Stack enough of them and it's Fish and Chips for dinner.
 
I thought maybe the event loop would have a little more freedom over its contents compared to the call stack, so it could handle deep recursion in a different way if it wanted
And that still might be the case, and it simply doesn't want to handle it in a different way
My confidence in that likelihood has dropped though
 
The event loop actually has no control over await. It just has the bottom coroutine.
 
Oh, I'm a little surprised. But that's a reasonable design.
 
Though you can easily split the stack by inserting tasks, similar to how one can split sync call stack via threads.
import asyncio
async def add(a,b):
    if a == 0: return b
    else: return await asyncio.create_task(add(a-1, b+1))
print(asyncio.run(add(1000, 0)))
 
@MisterMiyagi programmings are just fancy if elses :D
Just had that talk with mgmt, just a lot of if elses right? xD
 
4:17 PM
[I add "arbitrarily deep recursion by creating arbitrarily many threads???" to my notebook of inadvisable ideas]
 
it's all lambda expressions all the way down, anyway
 
I'm very tempted because I might finally get a chance to use a reentrant lock
 
@Kevin If you desire wisdom, seek failure.
What could possibly go wrong, eh?
 
Windows might barf after I ask it to create the 2^16th thread in a row
 
The only limit is your mind. And memory.
 
4:29 PM
import threading
import queue
def call_threadily(func, *args, **kwargs):
    result = queue.Queue(1)
    def f():
        result.put(func(*args, **kwargs))
    t = threading.Thread(target=f)
    t.start()
    t.join()
    assert result.full()
    return result.get()

def adder(a,b):
    if a == 0: return b
    else: return call_threadily(adder, a-1, b+1)

print(adder(2**14, 0)) #result: 5 seconds of silence, then `16384`
Pretty sure this is not the most concise approach, but oh well.
I didn't hear my fan kick into overdrive, so thread creation must be more streamlined than I thought. Still slow in comparison to the single-process equivalent though.
When I tried passing in 2**16, it felt like a lot more than 20 seconds elapsed before I gave up and terminated the shell. There may be nonlinear performance costs when you get into the big numbers.
page swapping or writing to disk or some other catastrophe like that
 
I still don't quite get why there isn't a simple "thread/process that returns a result" feature in Python. :/
Can't someone think about the Future for once?
 
Now that you mention it, that would be nice to have.
Python core devs, please add call_threadily to the next Python version, thanks in advance.
 
I usually just have a helper write to a nonlocal instead of a Queue, but it sure is ugly.
 
I hereby release the contents of the above code block into the public domain. This is not a joke.
Just in case the devs were dying to patch my code in, but needed to sort out the licensing first
Maybe there's no built-in call_threadily because it's a pain in the butt to get uncaught exceptions to pass over the barrier with all its bits intact.
You'd have a bunch of low-level references to a context that is more nonexistent than usual, since it's part of a now-dead thread
 
4:47 PM
You know, it's not fair turning silly ideas around. Now I want to know how large one can stitch a traceback...
 
Or maybe I overestimate the pain, since this exception-aware implementation of call_threadily doesn't seem to have trouble printing a non-native stack trace: pastebin.com/kyCJtFSh
I'm not sure if it's possible to have a single stack trace that starts at print(call_threadily(oops)) and ends at return 1/0. If I don't use raise from, then one end or the other is inside call_threadily
But then again I don't think there's a super compelling reason to want a stitched-together stack trace, besides aesthetics
 
5:10 PM
While researching the problem of "is it possible to access the return value of a thread after the thread dies? If not, why not?", I came upon this answer, which essentially says "no, because we copied the thread interface from Java, and Java doesn't let you access the return value, because Java is dumb". I like this answer.
Half because it gives interesting insight into the language's history, and half because haha Java dumb
 
 
1 hour later…
6:23 PM
Ugh, is this final or just an A/B test?
 
I don't see that when I go to stackoverflow.com/users/953482/kevin?tab=badges, so maybe it's an A/B test.
 
Ok. I see the same thing as your image, give or take the light/dark theming
 
Thanks. Also, bah.
 
So we need to update our priors for the hypotheses of "it's final" and "Andras is in an A/B test, given that Kevin is in the same category with him"... Where's my Bayesian formula
Ah heck, that's too much work. Let's just change P(it's final) from 0.5 to 0.75, and P(it's an AB test) from 0.5 to 0.25. That sounds about right.
 
6:32 PM
definitely correct orders of magnitude
 
If they're in [0,1] and they add up to 1, then it's good by my standards
 
It's the same view for me
 
Ok, we're at P(final) = 1-(2^-3); P(AB test) = 2^-3
We need five people to get P(final) above 95%. Which seems unfair, because P(AB test) jumps to like 99% as soon as a single reputable person says they see something different
The remaining 1% being the sum of long tail probabilities like "caching weirdness", "elaborate prank", "collective hallucination" etc
 
6:56 PM
Got less badges than Andras, does that count as a negative?
 
same for me as well
 
I don't put much weight into badges, it's all just numbers.
... He said, knowing full well his audience was comprised entirely of professional movers-around-of-ones-and-zeroes
 
some more than others
 
7:30 PM
Andras cheated and did some stuff with MATLAB too, presumably to get more badges.... (helps me sleep at night)
 
I really did
 
... I didn't have time to think ahead for a witty retort. Err, well I guess I'll have a great night's sleep?
 
If badge envy is transitive you should all tar and feather Kevin instead...
 
Yes, I'll assemble the mob :P
I guess the new look will align better with the <cough> great courses that the new SO owners offer
 
laurels
(literally)
 
7:46 PM
I should have a gold badge for literal laurels from Andras; that might be a first for me. I guess we're still in beta.
 
 
3 hours later…
10:44 PM
@LetMeBeYourLostDisciple I've been meaning to ask you: please omit the loud fluff.
Nobody else is shouting here and we prefer it that way.
 
10:55 PM
Hi
I have an error when reading a csv file "SyntaxError: (unicode error) 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 29-30: malformed \N character escape"
 
You should use r'' before giving file paths
 
Okay I tried that
But it didn't work
 
@YatShan then please provide an MCVE.
 
When I wrote r infront csv file path, it throws file not found error
Yes I am writing a MCVE
 
@YatShan do you think that's trying to tell you something?
 
10:57 PM
Hey, anyone familiar with doing a rolling counter check using python and json?
 
try passing a path that exists ;)
 
@YatShan If you are using relative paths, then it should be relative to the location you are running the code from. An MCVE is not going to reproduce this issue for us
 
@CoolCloud don't be silly. MCVEs reproduce the issue by definition.
 
import pandas as pd
dateparse = lambda dates: pd.datetime.strptime(dates, '%Y-%m-%d')

data= pd.read_csv('/content/gdrive/MyDrive/Colab\Notebooks/Stock_Data/ETFs/aaxj.us.txt', sep=',', index_col='Date', parse_dates=['Date'], date_parser=dateparse)
data.head(10)
 
If you think MCVE means "a snippet of code" then you really need to readjust your stance @CoolCloud
 
10:59 PM
Above is the MCVE
 
readjusting...
 
@YatShan No, that's not an MCVE.
 
Oh okay
 
But why is there Colab\Notebooks in there?
surely the backslash should not be there, or there's a space missing
 
The code is being written in Google Colaboratory
It is IDE kind of thing
 
11:00 PM
we know what google colaboratory is
 
Okay
 
Where did you get that path from?
 
Right click on data file and copy path
 
And who created the allegedly Colab\Notebooks directory?
 
It is already there by default
 
11:03 PM
What is the file that is not being found? The txt file? or the directory?
 
I tried with backslash and space and it is the same error
 
Which same error? You mentioned two.
 
So far to me, it looks like a relative path, so you need to find from where the the file is being executed and try to make it relative to that.
 
The command "%cd /content/gdrive/MyDrive/Colab\ Notebooks/Stock_Data/ETFs/" works fine in google colab. When the path is given to read_csv it throws error
Yeah
 
@CoolCloud which part of /content looks relative to you?
 
11:06 PM
@AndrasDeak I was referrring to file not found error
 
@YatShan in this case you have a space after the backslash
 
Yeah give me a minute
 
@YatShan you just need a space in the path
the backslash is there to escape the space in the command prompt or terminal
 
Still file not found error - "FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: '/content/gdrive/MyDrive/Colab\\ Notebooks/Stock_Data/ETFs/aaxj.us.txt'"
 
pd.read_csv('/content/gdrive/MyDrive/Colab Notebooks/Stock_Data/ETFs/aaxj.us.txt', ...)
and this is why spaces in paths are evil
 
11:08 PM
Oh okay
Let me try
 
fingers crossed
 
Yeah it worked
 
excellent
 
Thanks a lot @AndrasDeak
You're great !
 
tell google they should do better
 
11:09 PM
Ha ha Lol
 
@AndrasDeak Nice thinking, I wouldnt have thought it would be for escaping space, prolly typing style, meh
 
Thank you @CoolCloud for troubleshooting
 
it's my greatest work to date
 
I know, I know....
 

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