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12:05 AM
@GrahamChiu Your question can be answered in the negative after ignoring everything but the first three words. :)
 
So, both Github and Travis are making changes due to interdependence
 
@GrahamChiu They didn't decide to do this on the spur of the moment, it's just when I went into the dashboard to start fiddling things I wanted to fiddle it was telling me I couldn't because I was on the deprecated system.
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE I think it's a conspiracy. The Russians made them do this!
 
It has been in the works a long time (apparently), but the problem is that if I push "build" and it won't build, and the Travis CI status reports are saying "issue only affecting the legacy system" and there's no ETA for fixing it, then... well, I could wait and they might fix it, but when the work I'm doing is Travis-oriented, I have to bite the bullet and lose a night or day.
Or day and night
 
 
1 hour later…
2:32 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE has the commit file name changed in each directory?
 
@GrahamChiu Nothing has changed due to that besides the label shown in that table. It's easier to read. I also like having the number in the name, so I can at-a-glance jump to the build matrix entry. Nice.
Also the labels make it a bit clearer what we're doing, I just changed the "Emscripten Asyncify" etc. to something more obvious. "WebAssembly w/pthreads, release" and "WebAssembly no pthreads, release".
I guess I don't need the "p" even. Just threads. or "w/threads" and "single-threaded"
@MarkI I have a pretty clever way of avoiding us winding up with release dependencies on printf, fprintf.... This means if a release build ever tries to compile using it, you get a pretty clear indication it's happening.
Tons of code that isn't targeting embedded systems think nothing of throwing in printf. But mbedTLS is made for putting on chips with no terminals etc. You have to fiddle the configuration around a bit to know when you've got all the settings flipped around to not use fprintf/printf, but this way I can know even without trying to build on a system without <stdio.h> ...
 
3:35 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE every dog and his son must be using travis now .. it's over an hour for the first run
 
@GrahamChiu Hm? I'm getting my builds immediately on travis-ci.com ... travis-ci.org is no longer active for ren-c
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE I was looking at .com but it wasn't auto refreshing on me
 
So the idle idea of supporting BigNum series indices is not going to pan out, otherwise each NEXT operation would be creating a new bignum node once you were in bignum range. You don't destroy the old cell when you step forward. It's not like the proposed ADD where you have a choice if you're doing serial additions, e.g. incrementation...
Your series indices and lengths will be platform-pointer-sized, which is fine.
Systemically it would be a nightmare to have to handle BigNum issues on every series position, as well. There are going to have to be contained transitions into and out of the BigNum-able world, and each time you go from bignum capable to not you could have an overflow. That's a big deal. Being able to compile as C++ is going to be very helpful here, for doing extra checks the core got it right.
 
4:00 AM
@GrahamChiu Are there any sites of interest that Ren-C cannot TLS-read today?
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE not that I'm aware of
 
All right, just in time for bed after an 18-hour coding-and-integrating day :-/ we are getting all green lights on an extracted subset of mbedTLS tuned to provide RC4 (not that we need it, but replaces what we had), SHA256, and Diffie-Hellman(-Merkel) key exchange...
I'll explain what it all means in a forum post, but it's quite good news, so expect more good things. Nite!
 
 
5 hours later…
9:06 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE There is a "settings" in the 'menu' when you open the repository. Click that and you see the way to rename the repository. I found out after I did the same you did when I renamed this repo github.com/r3n/Designs/settings to "Designs". ;-)
 
 
12 hours later…
 
2 hours later…
11:27 PM
RIPEMD (RIPE Message Digest) is a family of cryptographic hash functions developed in 1992 (the original RIPEMD) and 1996 (other variants). There are five functions in the family: RIPEMD, RIPEMD-128, RIPEMD-160, RIPEMD-256, and RIPEMD-320, of which RIPEMD-160 is the most common. The original RIPEMD, as well as RIPEMD-128, is not considered secure because 128-bit result is too small and also (for the original RIPEMD) because of design weaknesses. The 256- and 320-bit versions of RIPEMD provide the same level of security as RIPEMD-128 and RIPEMD-160, respectively; they are designed for applications...
^-- it's used in BitCoin. :-/ Should I go ahead and enable it?
The biggest issue to resolve with extensions is how to make a Wasm "DLL". We need to have little pluggable extensions that you can load and get the features but not need to load them all. But there's no LoadLibrary() or dlopen() standard for that. but what's cool is the way that things are being sifted out, the dynamism is all done via Rebol functions vs. C linkages. That's working out quite well.
 

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