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12:21 AM
@GrahamChiu Ugh. Well I guess it's time for me to move on.
 
12:40 AM
@GrahamChiu Might as well go the 'invite only' route. Provide a user with deets and be done with it. Make the chat public with a 'if you would like to join.. ' message at the top.
 
the only barrier is that you provide credentials that say who you are.
 
@GrahamChiu that, and the steps required to provide that info
 
Interesting gitter.im/red/red if you hover over the people's icons it displays often their full name, email, website etc
 
Here's a better idea with a hardware solution.. have users purchase one of these. (All proceeds to Ren-C development)

https://youtu.be/UJUKEvT8fMI
 
12:57 AM
@Atomica hard to attach to a Google cloud instance
 
@GrahamChiu On the contrary
AND.. you could use it at the next conference :)
 
 
16 hours later…
5:27 PM
So I am trying to implement what I suggested about CR LF sequences being not casually accepted. But while I think #{00} bytes need to be fully excluded from being internal to strings, it's a somewhat heavy proposition to start banning codepoints of "invisibles" from so-called TEXT!. Here's one example to ponder:
It's in prot-http.r, the line crlf2: to text! crlf2bin
If we are super strict, you can't do that. I was thinking we might get around this with having TO-TEXT be a special native with a /RELAX option. So at least this way, you identify the conversions that are bringing in these foreign codepoints.
I'm not sure when this is a better idea than using BINARY!...as I mentioned it seems like the biggest problem with that is just the inconvenience of looking at what you have in a debugger. If we say "oh, you can just use a better debug dump viewer that shows you bytes and any textual codepoints" that does add some burden if you haven't sort of labeled the string as being "text-like". Because how would a PROBE or otherwise know to show you that view?
An answer that might be the best of both worlds would be one in which you kept things literal and used a BLOCK! with runs of TEXT! and BINARY! in it. Then you are taking advantage of Rebol's unique nature to really show what you've got. Then make whatever I/O code you have able to stream that out without needing to turn it into some other form, e.g. the network code can take a BLOCK! like that directly without the memory or time cost of making one big BINARY!.
Perhaps if we had PORT! parsing we could be economical in the reverse direction; you PARSE the port as it comes over the wire, emitting a BLOCK! with the runs and decode just as you want to see it.
(for those wondering why I am doing this right now, it's because we have a bug which is part of a whole category of bugs... and fixing the bug involves running a lot of various repeated code paths down through something more like one vetted routine where we get it right.)
 
 
3 hours later…
9:15 PM
you can now add an icon to your chat account
add-icon o [chat-object!] icon-url [url!]
 
I succeeded in changing a label from the input of an entry field. Weird that there is no simple GTK function to get an element by the name or id.
 
9:43 PM
I think about using a map! or table to collect all named elements with a pointer to the meant object.
 
 
1 hour later…
10:50 PM
So this ANY-STRING! prescriptivism is a new thing and there will be some feeling it out.
I don't really know of languages doing this...which is one of the reasons I want to do it.
By having an unfiltered BINARY! type that's pretty much as capable for manipulating bytes as anything, we can afford to make TEXT! types more ergonomic. It may be that we come up with UTF8! as a sort of compromise for "experts" working with the full range of codepoints, where invisibles and crazy things are permitted laissez-faire.
But TEXT! might stay prescriptive to help your average person be a little more hygenic about their formats. I don't know.
Or maybe we say that it's all the responsibility of the edge points that let binary enter into TEXT! or go out of it that has the responsibility.
But I think being firm about this is a distinguishing factor. I mentioned how I think the zero byte hard rule has this very concrete influence on the API which makes it a good rule. CR LF is such a bugaboo and nightmare that being able to make any encroachment on helping people know when and where such contamination is getting in looks like one of those future-forward things...like betting on UTF-8 itself.
 

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