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2:03 AM
I am wondering if what I am seeing is a garbage flood attack of my httpd server blog.radware.com/security/2017/11/http-attacks
so the attacker opens a port to httpd, and then sends random binary data to it
attempting to overflow buffers
I received this binary string #{0300002F2AE00000000000436F6F6B69653A206D737473686173683D41646D696E697374720D0A0100080003000000}
So, maybe I need to decide if I'm in a GET or POST state. If I'm in a GET state, then close the subport. If I'm in a POST state, then it may be just binary data being transmitted
 
 
5 hours later…
7:02 AM
@Atomica duckduckgo
 
 
5 hours later…
11:59 AM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE (revisiting that hint)
I suspect it has something to do with the ext-view-init.reb ALSO (pun intended) that off course has the "old" functions from the original referred as well. So that does not add up. Going to the drawing and experimenting board again! Thnx again!
 
 
4 hours later…
3:44 PM
@MarkI Agreed. Unf this often leads to short-term thinking and increase in market externalities.
 
 
4 hours later…
8:10 PM
>> p: open tcp://localhost:8081
>> insert p "GET /"
>> close p
 
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE "Timelessness" My stack of choice in 1992
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RoboBOARD/FX
 
Try this r2 code on your r3 httpd. On mine it crashes httpd.
 
Just a thought, and maybe way out there, but have you guys looked at Cheyenne's httpd.r for any tips? github.com/dockimbel/cheyenne/blob/master/Cheyenne/HTTPd.r
 
What happens is that closing the port on Rebol2 client causes a close event on the r3 side, then a read event! The port is thought to be still open even though the close event was received. So, it's not closing the port correctly
It tries to read the closed port and crashes
Or, the test being used to see if the port is open is incorrect
@Atomica cheyenne uses synchronous tcp, and r3 uses async
 
 
1 hour later…
9:34 PM
@HostileForksaysdonttrustSE it's a fascinating idea!
 
@giuliolunati Windows can drill down inside zip files for reading (I don't think you can write). There's no technical reason why we couldn't do it, pathing into a ZIP, though writing will be more or less no better than unpacking, modifying, and writing a new file. So really the only optimization would be reading.
I think generating bootstrap makefiles is probably an easier first target than building an r3 in browser (and that lets you use a better compiler than TCC)
But, we could build r3 with tcc in browser to download to x86
And it would be interesting to demonstrate that, as a kind of PR stunt, or whatever.
 
9:56 PM
@giuliolunati I think we need to make REBVAL a distinct datatype in JS; not just use memory addresses (integer), and we should make a future bet that we will someday get a wasm hook into the GC. Until we get that hook, we can make these distinct JS handles tracked by a table and when a function ends, we can remove the handle from the table and have any access to it safely raise an error.
This means that if you are working in JS and a function ends and you want to hold a handle to something past that function ending, you do it by virtue of putting whatever data into some persistent Rebol structure.
This would mean that rebR() and rebRelease() aren't required, though you could do it for efficiency if you wanted to.
And it would mean that you could pass integers normally in API calls without rebI()
There's not a good certain way in JS to distinguish a string literal e.g. rebValue("first reduce [", a, b, c, "]"); from a string value...e.g. if a is a javascript string, we can't tell if "x y z" should be treated as [x y z] or {x y z}
e.g. we want that to mean [first reduce [...]], not {first reduce [}, ... {]} ... but that just makes us stuck on having two potential interpretations of strings we have to deal with
 
 
1 hour later…
11:12 PM
^-- in C++ my choice was that a std::string would act as TEXT!, but a char* would act as LOAD'ed material. If you had a std::string that contained material you wanted loaded, you could say str.c_str() and it would treat it that way. But plain str was a single-value TEXT!
JavaScript does not have quite the clear line in that way that C++ does.
 

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