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1:44 AM
awesome solution to my problem @MisterMiyagi, 900 lines of code vs 5 :P
I couldn't understand your solution, though, @Kevin, even though I now know understand how lambdas, recursive functions and defaultdict work, more or less. How exactly is a line like `d[1][2][3] = 4` calling the recursive function? Also, if there was another value registered before like let's say `d[1][5] = 3`, wouldn't your function 'override' it? (erase)
awesome solution to my problem @MisterMiyagi, 900 lines of code vs 5 :P
I couldn't understand your solution, though, @Kevin, even though I now know understand how lambdas, recursive functions and defaultdict work, more or less. How exactly is a line like ´d[1][2][3] = 4´ calling the recursive function? Also, if there was another value registered before like let's say `d[1][5] = 3`, wouldn't your function 'override' it? (erase)
'k=5'
 
 
7 hours later…
9:08 AM
ohai
 
@Wietbot evalnode for (var i = 0; ; ++i) console.log('[', i, "]: ", "Hello, World!");
 
@Wietlol me.wietlol.aws.lambda.LambdaException(unknown: 2020-07-11T09:09:24.553Z 3818c3e8-996e-46be-9373-37464052fe80 Task timed out after 10.01 seconds[])
 
 
13 hours later…
10:02 PM
0
A: Multi-level defaultdict with variable depth?

wimYou may achieve this with a recursive defaultdict. from collections import defaultdict def tree(): def the_tree(): return defaultdict(the_tree) return the_tree() It is important to protect the default factory name, the_tree here, in a closure ("private" local function scope). ...

 

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