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12:44 AM
Ribbit
 
 
2 hours later…
2:17 AM
Ribbit
 
That's an oldie, casually I just saw the Spanish version of that story yesterday
Why people keep starring cats :(
Those monstrosities are evil
 
morning Raymond
 
Mornight Zarni
 
Do you know the best way not to appear API keys
when our app is de-compiled by reverse engineering methods?
Although I used proguard, my api keys can be seen after de-compiled my apk. I was struggling for 2 days and not still luck :(
 
2:36 AM
I've never seen about it being important to protect those keys till now
What's your concern?
 
I am still struggling for that Raymond.
Can anyone share the best way not to appear API keys
when our app is de-compiled by reverse engineering methods?
 
Did the frog named 'Ribbit'?
 
Rob
@ZarNiMyoSettWin The only way to not have it reverse engineered is to not compile it into your binary in the first place
Anything else merely obfuscates it and makes it more difficult to obtain... but it's always possible
 
At least Google services API keys can be "restricted" to package names
It grants you some level of protection, but besides that, generally decompiling an app is a crime if you use this for bad purposes
 
@Rob Thank you Rob.
@RaymondArteaga except Google services API keys, most api keys cannot be restricted with package names. So, I want to hide these keys when decompile my apk.
 
2:46 AM
Do the same as Google, or even better, use encryption keys
Trust certificates and stuff for your protocols
But only if it worths the trouble
 
okay Raymond.
 
Also on user log in you can generate new API keys and throttle their access to server resources
There's a whole bunch of solutions you can apply depending on your use case
 
But, I am afraid attacker can also know how to request to my server and will generate new API keys by reading de-compiled code.
 

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