« first day (2890 days earlier)   

12:00 AM
"People rise to the occasion without hesitation when they feel inspired and challenged." -Lorii Myers (source)
 
is this our resident bot? neat
so now we know that Streams have all those operators we need, but we have a problem
 
Just FYI, I know about lists but haven't used. I just know their better versions of arrays with more methods you can call.
(Sorry)
 
that's pretty much all you need to know about them, they're just more OO versions of arrays
so if we convert our list to a Stream and we want to run two operations on it -- say, a filter and a map -- but our filter gives us back a List, then what will we do?
we'll need to convert the List back to a Stream before we can run our map
 
And what exactly are "Collections"? I have seen before. But just want to make sure.
 
a Collection is literally just a collection of objects. It's just an interface that everything like Lists, Sets, etc. all inherit from
 
12:03 AM
ah
 
basically just means that it's Iterable
not technically but that doesn't matter
 
@forresthopkinsa wdym by this? Don't you just do x -> Math.sqrt(x*2)?
@forresthopkinsa ok...
 
well inside of the lambda scope, sure
the lambda just knows, number in, number out
 
yepo
 
but our map function needs to return some kind of Object
 
12:04 AM
buuuuuuutttt.....
:)
 
hahahaha. if we need to run another Stream operation after our map then we want it to return a Stream
our Streams, being streams, like method chaining: list.filter(...).map(...).skip(2)...
 
@forresthopkinsa wdym return an object, why not just an int or string, etc.?
 
well the map() function operates on the scale of the entire list, rather than each element
so e.g. if map() returned an int, then where would the list go?
a series of numbers goes into the map and a series of numbers goes out. The question is, what container is holding that series of numbers
 
well I figured its the equivlant of a for loop so it would just replace the original value that x originally was but as I am typing that I am realizing that that makes no sense....
 
haha yeah a map doesn't modify its input
 
12:08 AM
just passes it
 
@forresthopkinsa Idk.
 
and since the map operates on itself (i.e., it doesn't take the list of numbers as one of its parameters; it acts on the instance it belongs to), the input will always be the Type that map is a part of
i.e. a Stream
sorry if that's kind of a difficult explanation
 
So basically.....
List doesn't have the map option, but stream does, so we have to convert it a .stream(). But map will return what we give it (a stream) so we have to convert it back to a list
 
right
check this out
this is the method definition of Map:
 
12:11 AM
vs. JS where the Array directly has the map()
 
it's inside the Stream interface
right
 
@forresthopkinsa IntelliJ! XD
 
of course! hahaha
 
@forresthopkinsa you say that yet everyone else in my class uses eclipses, including the teacher
/facepalm
 
12:13 AM
IME students use Eclipse and professionals use IDEA
not 100% true but that's very often what I see
 
@forresthopkinsa ok so what exactly is that telling us
 
I used Eclipse for a long time but shortly after I started working, I grabbed IDEA and I was amazed at how much more powerful it is
what it's telling us is the method contract for .map()
we have two inputs for it
 
@forresthopkinsa I'm in High School so their def not pro's XD
 
hahaha yeah I was using Eclipse at that point as well
the first input is the instance that map is being called on, i.e. the Stream coming from before the period
myStream.map()
the second is our parameter, the lambda
...map(myFunction)
 
@forresthopkinsa Never used eclipse. I am self taught + stack overflow and I was told to use a Intellij so I went with it and it was great!! I was originally using terminal javac and java (yeah, I know)
 
12:16 AM
you definitely have to start there so that you know what's going on under the covers
 
@forresthopkinsa Got that.
 
ok so
we'll talk about the output in a sec
hey sorry talking to coworker
 
@forresthopkinsa I demand that you quit your job and prioritize some random person on the internet over your job.
;)
 
absolutely sir
so here's the chain I presented earlier:
15 mins ago, by forresthopkinsa
our Streams, being streams, like method chaining: list.filter(...).map(...).skip(2)...
.filter and .map and .skip are all Stream operations
we have to make them all return Streams so that we can chain them like that
 
wait
 
12:22 AM
or else we'd have to do something like list.toStream().map(...).toStream().filter(...).toStream.skip(2)...
 
I thought they were returning streams, thats the problem
 
they are yes, I'm explaining why
 
ah
got it
 
soo
at the end of our chain
we have a Stream that has all the filtered, mapped elements in it
and we need to turn it back into a List
 
.toList? XD
 
12:25 AM
we use .collect(...) to collect stream elements
nearly! but Java is way more wordy than that hahaha
.collect(Collectors.toList())
 
@forresthopkinsa ofc. Why would Java make it easy for us?
 
and then we have a List
hahahaha right
 
so why .collect?
"to collect stream elements" wdym?
 
well the idea of a Stream is that every operation done on it just acts on each element
none of them are really "aware" of the bigger picture, i.e. the list
so the terminal operator, collect, is just taking the elements being passed down from above and adding each one to a list
in some really weird situation where you're trying to return a stream I guess
you're pretty much always going to end up finishing your stream with a .collect or something similar
 
oh
Can you have a stream variable type?
 
12:28 AM
in your situation, you don't have a list. You have an array. So it's a little different.
sure
everything in Java is typed of course
 
just making sure :)
 
you can hold the result of any operation in a variable
except void I guess
so
your array
based on this answer, looks like your "collector" is going to look like .toArray(Integer[]::new)
 
hold up
 
so .collector.toArray(Integer[]::new)? If so, can you also explain ":" see them all the time but never use them. I am guessing they are the shorting of something longer?
 
12:32 AM
sure
:: is a method reference
let me explain
 

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