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8:52 AM
Can anyone familiar with engine internals comment on whether preventing a certain subset of classes so marked as static classes being used as type hints is either (a) possible or (b) practical (with respect to performance)?
9:15 AM
It's possible, but I am not sure how practical. It depends what the mechanism is to declare which classes should not be allowed. And this will only ever be a run time check.
10:03 AM
The mechanism is to add static to the class declaration
So therefore I guess the class would have to at least be autoloaded, but I presume that is the case anyway when a class is type hinted, at least at runtime
oh, you meant all static classes - not just a subset of static classes.
All classes so marked, yes
so yes, you're right that classes would have to be autoloaded - and yes, that's always needed with a type as well at run time
It should not be valid to use a static class as a type hint simply because one could never pass an instance of such a class
And whilst you should have to be mad to use such a class as a type hint, if the cost is not too great, we should probably add a runtime warning/error for this
This could then just be a run time check when an object of a static class has been passed.
(while doing the argument type-checking)
10:07 AM
But you can't pass an object of a static class because static classes cannot be instantiated
Therefore such an object could never come into existence
So actually the "runtime" check makes no sense; either we can resolve it at compile time or the feature is a total bust
type checking is a run-time thing - not compile time
(at least with arguments)
Inheritance can be earlier, but I am not actually sure how if at all, that is done.
You can even specify a non-existent class as a function argument, it won't break before the function is called.
If the argument is nullable, you can even call the function with null
Well the feature is a bust, but I don't think it's particularly important anyway. Thanks for clarifying
10:13 AM
It's partly why we do static analysis
Sure. Let the (third party) static analysers detect this condition
 
2 hours later…
12:01 PM
@Derick Inheritance will autoload classes to check that it satisfies the variance checks
cheers - it's what I expected, but wasn't sure about
 
3 hours later…
2:56 PM
@QuolonelQuestions Last I checked, types were not autoloaded when they don't match the type check.
function f(StaticClass $foo)
^ StaticClass would not be loaded if the argument didn't match.
This goes for instanceof too.
But when inheritance is at play, unrecognized types get loaded to check that they are compatible with the parent signature.
 
5 hours later…
7:43 PM
Can I assume that if Foo is in OPCache, Bar will always be as well?

class Foo extends Bar {}
The answer is probably here, but I don't know C github.com/php/php-src/blob/master/ext/opcache/…
@LucasBustamante Why? What's the context?
I'm trying to understand what caused a fatal error on WooCommerce 9.0, where we had a scenario of Foo extends Bar, both Foo and Bar were deleted, but on some hosts, when calling class_exists('Foo') it would still load Foo.php, which would trigger a fatal error of Bar not found
Since neither Foo.php nor Bar.php was part of the build, I'm wondering if it could be related to OPCache or partial updates, but I suspect that when caching Foo, Bar would be cached as well
It doesn't make sense, and thus the conundrum
8:09 PM
I'll keep digging into this, but I'm assuming that OPCache would cache both Foo and Bar, and rule out a scenario of cached Foo and filesystem Bar
 
1 hour later…
9:23 PM
@Girgias @LeviMorrison Right. I'm not sure if you were expressing this to change my conclusion? It seems the conclusion is still exactly the same: PHP does not support compile time type checking except for inheritance, but we are not concerned with inheritance type checking here: we want to do function/method type checks at compile time, which is not supported
@LucasBustamante Both files are compiled and cached separately with opcache. Dependencies are tracked at runtime.
This is the text as entered into my draft RFC. Is there anything technically wrong with these statements?
>It should be regarded as an error to type hint a static class, since they cannot be instantiated and thus the requirement can never be fulfilled by a matching instance. However, it is not technically possible to forbid such hints within PHP itself because type checking is done when an instance is passed at runtime (and we can never have such an instance). The engine does not support type checking at compile time for function/method signatures.
Please correct me if anything is wrong

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